NLGenWeb Newspaper Transcriptions

Daily News

Misc. News Items  - July - December 1941

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The records were transcribed by JOHN BAIRD & SUE O'NEILL.  Formatted by GEORGE WHITE
While we have endeavored to be as correct as humanly possible, there could be some typographical errors.
 

  

 

PUB.DATE

EVENT

DETAILS

July 2 1941 WEDDING BELLS BREEZE — ADAMS: A quiet but pretty wedding was solemnized at the Old Garrison Church of St. Thomas’s on Monday, June 30th, by the Rev. J.T. Rhodes, when Miss Lillian Adams, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Adams of York Street, was led to the Altar by Rifleman Arthur T. Breeze, son of Mr. and Mrs. A.L. Breeze of Montreal.

The bride, who was given in marriage by her father, was charmingly attired in a dress of rose crepe-de-chene, with accessories to match. She was attended by her sister, Miss Florence Adams, who was prettily attired in blue crepe-de-chene. Both carried beautiful bouquets. The duties of best man were ably performed by the groom’s brother, Rifleman Maurice T. Breeze. After the wedding ceremony, the party motored to the home of the bride’s parents, where a sumptuous supper was served. Afterwards, dancing was indulged in, and a gala time was had by all. The many beautiful presents received testify to the esteem in which the young people are held. The groom is at present stationed at an inland town.

The writer extends best wished and many years of wedded bliss. COM.

July 2 1941 OBITUARY ELIZABETH GUEST: As the dewy shades of evening were closing in on Monday, the Grim Reaper paid another visit to the Sanitorium, and this time claimed as it victim, Elizabeth, aged 20 years, youngest daughter of Robert C. and Elizabeth Guest of the Southside Road.

Barely six months ago, this young lady was in the prime of health, full of life and hope; even up to a month ago she was looking forward to being around again as usual, before the summer was over. As late as Sunday though, her condition then was not promising. There was no indication that the end was so near, and so it was a very great shock to all friends, when it became known that on Monday evening, the Lord called her to Himself. Surrounded by her loving parents, sisters and brothers, after having been visited by Rev. Canon Stirling.

“She faded , and so calm and meek, So softly worn, so sweetly weak, So tearless, yet so tender, kind And grieved for those she left behind.”

Amongst her hosts of associates, Elizabeth Guest was one of the most popular of young ladies, and deservedly so. She had all the traits that endeared, and of her can it be truly said, “None knew her but to love her, none named her but to praise.”

She was a member of St. Mary’s Girls Club, and one of the Sunday School Teachers who took a very active interest in all Church work, and it was a cause for sadness amongst her co-workers at the annual picnic yesterday, that she could not be with them, as she had last year and previous years. She was the youngest daughter of a large family, and was the first to break the chain. Who would have though that this bright, happy, buoyant young lady, would have been chosen at her early age, but the Almighty ruled it so, and her parents and relatives are accepting their cross in this spirit .

Left to mourn besides her parents are six sisters viz, Mesdames John Crane, Max March, John Saunders, Norman Janes, Misses Violet and Gladys, all of this city; five brothers – Lance, Bombardier, Herbert and Gunner George, of the Newfoundland Regiment Heavy Artillery, having left with the first contingent, and Edward who left with the first draft of the Forestry Corps; as well as Gordon and Fred at home.

The funeral takes place from her late residence 229 South Side Road at 2.30 this afternoon. “I cannot say and I will not say That she is dead. She just went away, With a cherry smile and a wave of the hand She has wandered into an unknown land, And left us dreaming how very fair, It need must be since she lingered there.”

July 2 1941 OBITUARY JOHN LAUGHLIN: SYDNEY, June 26 — The death occurred at his home on Mount Pleasant Street, Whitney Pier, Wednesday evening, of John Laughlin, well known resident of Whitney Pier.

He was 62 years old, a resident of Sydney for the past 35 years, and his passing followed a general illness. Deceased was a native of Newfoundland, and had been employed at the Steel Plant ever since coming to Sydney.

His wife predeceased him nine years ago, and surviving are two sons, Ernest and Douglas; four daughters, Hannah, Eileen, Hazel, and Rosella; also two brothers, William, and Ernest, in Sydney; two sisters, Maria Laughlin, and Mrs. Phil Garland, also in this city.

July 2 1941 OBITUARY Mrs. WALTER PIKE: FRESHWARTER, Carbonear, June 26 — Just at night fall on the 30th of May, there passed away quietly a well known and respected resident of Freshwater, Carbonear, in the person of Minnie, beloved wife of Walter Pike. Beside her husband, she leaves to mourn a son, George, and two daughters, Hettie and Christina.

Those who mourn her loss most deeply, will remember her best and longest, as a devoted wife and mother; one whose first thought was for home and family; one whose care, forethought, and love, made the home what it was. We cannot think that such love and service will be utterly and for ever lost to us. Out Lord said “I go to prepare a place for you,” and John in exile on Patmos, saw that in the Life beyond, “His servants shall serve Him. May we not in reverent imagination, join these words together, and picture those who, “Made our home of life so pleasant,” as working with Him there, not with earthly things that perish, but with imperishable hope, faith and love, to make the unseen world a home for our hearts? But Mrs. Pike had wider interests. She was a good neighbor, a member of the Women’s Association, and the Women’s Missionary Society.

There were many floral tributes; and interment took place in the United Church cemetery, with Rev. A.W. Osborne, B.A., officiating, and a large attendance of friend and relatives.

July 2 1941 MARRIAGES BREEZE — ADAMS: At the Old Garrison Church of St. Thomas, by the Rev. J.T. Rhodes, Lillian Adams of St. John’s, to Rifleman Arthur T. Breeze of Canada.

MERRILL — MARSHALL: On Tuesday, June 24th, at 4 o’clock at the Oratory of the Convent of Our Lady of Mercy, Military Road. By Rt. Rev. Mons. Kitchen, Thomas T Merrill, of the U.S.A., to Miss Ellen Mary Marshall, daughter of Mr. Mark Marshall, 71 King’s Road, City.

July 2 1941 DEATHS PIKE — Passed peacefully away on July 1st., Thomas, aged 77 years, beloved husband of Margaret Pike, leaving wife, two daughters, four sons, one brother, six grand children, and two great grand children, to mour their sad loss. Funeral on Friday at 2.30 p.m. from his late residence 24 Gilbert Street.

MAYNARD — Passed peacefully away at St. Claire’s Mercy Hospital at 9.30 a.m. Monday, June 30th, David Maynard; leaving to mourn wife, one daughter, two brothers, James and Harry. Funeral today, Wednesday at 2.45 p.m. from his late residence, 65 Harvey Road.

GUEST — Passed peacefully away at 8.45 p.m. Monday, June 30, at the Sanitorium, Elizabeth, aged 20 years, youngest daughter of Robert E. and Elizabeth Guest. Leaving to mourn their sad loss; father, mother, six sisters — Mrs. John Crane, Mrs. Max March, Mrs. John Saunders, Mrs. Norman Janes, Misses Violet and Gladys, all of this city, and five brothers – L. Bdr. Herbert and Gunner George, in the Nfld Heavy Artillery, and Edward in the Nfld. Forestry Corps, and Gordon and Fred at home. Funeral today Wednesday at 2.30 p.m. from her parents residence 229 South Side Road.

July 2 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE According to the Grand Falls Advertiser, the Chief of Police was there on last Friday, and will be visiting several parts of the district before returning.

Caplin were very plentiful at several places near St. John’s in the past couple days, and yesterday, visitors derived great pleasure from seeing the fish come in on the beaches.

Navy boys from Bell Island who are home on leave, were entertained last night on Bell Island in the C.L.B. Armory. The entertainment began at 8.30 and a dance followed. The door receipts are to be divided amongst the boys, to help them defray their expenses in returning home and going back to duty.

Mr. Patrick Lahey of Lance Cove, recently placed a new fence along his property, fronting the road, and in doing so, moved his fence back ten feet, so as to widen the road at this point. He has set a very commendable example to all property owners along this road, and his public spirit should be followed by other residents of this section, so that this narrow thoroughfare can be widened—The Bell Islander.

It might be well for all visitors to this city to familiarize themselves with civic laws. Yesterday, a motor cycle and side car drove from the North-East corner of Bannerman Park to the Rennie’s Mill Road gate. That cut off two or three hundred yards across Circular Road and up Rennie’s Mill Road, but it was a breach of the regulations — vehicles are not permitted in the park. Besides, in this section the Playgrounds are located and many children are there daily. They are sent to the park to be safe from accidents and out of the way of motor cars and cycles , too.

A special train went out yesterday morning to Argentia and returned last night. Quite a few excursionists went out by this train and enjoyed the day.

The express leaving tomorrow evening will make connection at Humbermouth for regular points on the St. John’s-Humbermouth service.

Walter Chambers and his orchestra will be in attendance at the yacht Club tonight. Tomorrow night the Rhythm Kings will be playing.

A slight fire occurred at the dock on Monday, and the fire companies were called out but there was no need for their service. The blaze was caused by hot rivets and little damage was done.

A meeting of the Benevolent Irish Society will be held tonight at eight o’clock. Business of a special nature is to be discussed.

A dance will be held at the Area tomorrow night with Mickey Duggan and his orchestra in attendance.


July 3 1941 PROMOTIONS IN NFLD ARTILLERY The following promotions and appointments have recently been made and are quoted for general information.

57th (Nfld) Heavy Regt. R. A. 970392 A/Bdr. TOBIN, W., promoted A/Sgt. w.e.f. 22/5/41

59th (Nfld) heavy Regt., R. A. 971484 Gunner STROUD, A. E. Appointed A/L/Bdr. w.e.f. 1/6/41

971348 Gunner HYNES E., appointed A/L/Bdr 1/6/41/

Yours very truly

W. F. RENDELL, Lieut. Col

Director of Recruiting.

July 3 1941 MEN ATTESTED FOR ROYAL ARTILLERY The following men were attested on June 27th and will join the 10th Royal Artillery Draft:

BELL ISLAND

971398—HUTCHING, George.

971558—REES, Roy Allison.

971569—TUCKER, Gordon Edgar .

971561—REES, Lewis Raymond.

971563—NEWELL, Harvey .

971571—WHITE, Francis Roger. (Dg. Staff)

971574—DAVIS, Norman Jackson. (Gd staff)

971559—PETRIE, George Douglas. (Gd staff)

971562—EVELEIGH, Augustus Frederick K. (Gr. Staff)

971560—GOVER, Ralph. (Gd staff)

971564—TAYLOR, Charles Frederick. (Gd staff)

CARBONEAR DISTRICT

971544—ADAMS, Henley.

971565—POWELL, Edwin Lloyd.

CLARENVILLE DISTRICT

971578—GOULDING, Cecil Squires.

CORNER BROOK DISTRICT

971552—LODGE, Walter Emanuel.

971546—CORNECT, Gordon Gregory.

971577— OAKE, Ronald George.

971580—HEARN, Joseph Patrick.

971575—GREEN, Michael Leo.

GRAND FALLS DISTRICT

971548—FRY, Lewis.

971554—REID, Wm. James.

971547—DOWNTON, John Raymond.

97159—FRY, Raymond.

971551—KEATS, Gideon.

971553—MERCER, Harold Graham. (Gd staff)

HOLYROOD DISTRICT

971579—DALTON, John Patrick.

ST. GEORGE’S DISTRICT

971550—JESSO, Hugh.

971570—ANTHONY, John.

971568—HYNES, Clyde Cavell.

971557—GILLIS, Michael F. (Gd staff)

971566—PIKE, James Lloyd. (Gd. Staff)

ST. JOHN’S DISTRICT

971556—WHITEWAY, Albert Edward.

971572—GODDEN, Thomas.

971555—SMITH, Arthur Maxwell.

971545—CHAFE, Walter.

971567—LEHR, Alexander.

HARBOR BRETTON DISTRICT

971573—HARRIS, George Samuel.

TWILLINGATE DISTRICT

971576—CHAULK, George Norman.

July 3 1941 RESIDENT OF ARGENTIA DIES AT GRAND FALLS House Taken. Was on Way to United States to Spend Remaining Days of Life There

News was received in Argentia Saturday last, of the death at Grand Falls of Albert O’Reilly of Argentia, who was en route to New Bedford, Mass. The deceased was accompanied by his wife, his son Rev. P.J. O’Reilly, D.D., Vice-Rector of St. Joseph’s Seminary, Edmonton, Alberta, and his daughter Monica.

The late Mr. O’Reilly, who was 77 years old, was a passenger on Thursday’s West bound express, and collapsed on the train. At Grand Falls, he was taken to the Northcliffe Hospital, where he succumbed Saturday morning. The funeral took place at Grand Falls on Saturday afternoon.

In February of this year, Mr. and Mrs. O’Rielly had to leave their home at Argentia, for the land was required for the United States Naval Air Base. At that time, the aged couple decided that in the spring, they would go to New Bedford, and spend the remaining years of their lives with their children, five daughters who live at that city, and death met the head of the house on his way to New Bedford.

The deceased was a fisherman all his life, except for some time spent as a Custom Tidewaiter at Argentia. Forty-two years ago he first fished on St. Mary’s Bank as Skipper. For nine years he was Skipper of one of Mr. James Davis’s boats.

July 3 1941 PROPERTY IN SUBURBS SOLD The property belonging to the estate of the late Valentine Merchant, and situate on the road from Waterford Bridge to the Brookfield Road, was sold by auction last night on the premises, by P.C. O’Driscoll Ltd., and was purchased by Mr. M.J. O’Brien for the sum of $6,500.
July 3 1941 ROYAL ARTILLERY CASUALTY The director of Recruiting has been informed by the Under-Secretary of State for War, that NO.971077 GUNNER LEO THOMAS CHAFE, Royal Artillery, died on June 28th in No 7 Casualty Clearing Station, Benendum, Kent, from fractured skull, as the result of an accident. Next of kin, father, Mr. George Taylor, Taylor’s Bay, Lamaline, Newfoundland.
July 3 1941 WEDDING BELLS HEDGES — FRAIZE: THE United Church Manse was the scene of a pretty wedding on June 20th when Alma, only daughter of Robert and the late Mrs. Flora Hedges, was united in marriage to Hayward, only son of Mr. and Mrs. John Fraize, both of this town, by Rev H.M. Davis, B.A. The bride, given in marriage by her father, wore a dress of powder blue chiffon, with white accessories, and corsage bouquet, and was attended by Miss Carrie Fraize, sister of the groom, who wore a dress of saxe blue crepe, with navy accessories. The duties of best man were performed by Herbert Hedges, brother of the bride.

After the ceremony, the bridal party motored to the home of the bride’s parents, where supper was served to the relatives and friends of the young couple. Felicitations are extended.

KELLY — BRIAN: A very pretty wedding was solemnized on Wednesday afternoon past, at 3 p.m. when Miss Myrtle Brian, only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. Brain, Hill Road, Grand Falls, was united in marriage to Mr. Jack Kelly, younger son of Councillor and Mrs. Kelly of St. John’s, Reverend Frank Meaney, P.P., officiating, the wedding ceremony being performed at Windsor.

The bride looked charming in a beautiful pale grey ensemble with rose accessories. At 5 p.m. a small reception was held at the home of the bride’s parents, when members of the family and close friends only, attended, and toasts were drunk to the happy young couple.

Mr. and Mrs .Kelly left by Overland Limited that same night for St. John’s, where a visit will be made to the groom’s parents, and the honeymoon will be spent.

The bride, previous to her marriage, was a trusted member of the office staff of the A.N.D. Company Ltd. The groom is local Manager for the Great Eastern Oil and Import Company of St. John’s. — Grand Falls Advertiser.

July 3 1941 EXPRESS PASSENGERS The following passengers arrived at Port aux Basques yesterday: —

L. Savory, W. O’Brien, A. Coombs, Rev. J. Ball, E. Cribb, Mrs. H. Inkpen, Mrs. R Paul and child, Mrs. E. Wrixton, Miss R. Mews, J. Treston, S. Smith, W. Mice, J. Payne, E. Strangemore, R. Duder, Miss M. Cleary, L. Peddle, Mrs. M. Quinn, D. Howitt, D. Mills, D. Murdock, Capt. R. Williams, Miss D. Colman, Miss D. Hartery, Miss J Grandy, Mrs. W. Soper and 7 Children, J. Davis, A. Willis, C. Sivington, Mrs. B. Holt, Mrs. H. McLeod and 3 children, E. Head, F. Petten, J. Snow, N. Miller, Miss C. Calver, A. Davis, W. Lomorrowski, E. Manchini, E. J. Dolan, Miss A Balles, A Caffonata, Miss A Ford, W. Johnson, J. Jackson, A. Rooms, W. Allan, A. Kean, J. Hai, R. Freskett, A Ledmarsh, R. Riggs, Mrs. G. Green and 2 children, J. Michaeleis, L Latour, J. Boone, W. Ball, C Kellogg, Mrs. E. Barron, L. McMahon, Rev. and Mrs. J.A. Toop and child, W. Mercer, R. Corton, Miss M. Fox, Miss A Fox, Mrs. C.E. Hunt, D. Hunt, D.E Outerbridge, Mrs. E Outerbridge, Mrs. W. Blandford and child, Mrs. S. Cooper, Dr. F. Killeridge, F. Bush, J and Mrs. McIntrye, J Read, S. Tuff, R. Vaiden, Mrs. K Kelly and 2 children, C.C. Pratt, Mrs. M. Richards, Mrs. C. Brimsley, A and Mrs. Gillingham, J.H. Laing, R. Brusell, G. Miller, Mrs. F. Butler, and child, Mrs. J. Manning, W. Mcneill, Mrs. F.A. Stocks, A. Mihoffer, G. Shunman, Miss M. Haig, Miss M. Vatcher, Mrs, E. Secardini, L. Forget, Miss M. Saist, E. Onge, B. Leonard, Mrs. S. Brown, D. Irving, A. Cooper, Miss C Penney , J. Beck, J. Martin, J. Brushett, J. Craig, F. Butler, G. Skeans, F. Walburn, R. Denault, A Pourier, C. Everett, M. Coe, Mrs. E. Burton, Miss S Organ, E.G. and Mrs. Cousens, E. Shea, Miss M. Pottle, A and Mrs. Fifield and child, Mrs. G. Coveyduck, J. Parsons, M. Gorman, P. Brown, A. Mullins, Dr. amd Mrs. Grobin and child, Mrs. M. Whelan and child, R. Simpson, R. Busbon, Mrs. V. Dart, J. Benoit, Mrs. T.W. Murray and child, Miss S Sicarbo, F. Nebury, H. Klapisch, M . Succhouz, A. Bragg. J Mason, O. Dann, H. Berger and child, Mrs. J. Arnold and child, Mrs. H. Black, Mrs. E. Payne, Mrs. H.B. Thompson and daughter. Mrs. A Colburne, Mrs. N. Day, Mrs. G. Bevin and 2 children, Mrs. J Spencer, Mrs. A Barrett and 2 children, M.C. McCullin, J. Bromley, Mrs. M. Archibald and 2 children, Sister Cyrille, Sister Augusta, J.M Barrett.

July 3 1941 DEATHS FINNEY — Passed peacefully away July 2nd 11.20 a..m Margaret, beloved wife of William Finney, in her 22nd year; leaving to mourn their sad loss, husband, three children, father, mother, 2 sisters, 2 brothers and a large circle of friends. Funeral from her late residence 370 Water Street Friday July 4th at 2.30 p.m. R. I. P.
July 3 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE The express train leaving in the evening, will make connection at Humbermouth for the St. John’s-Humbermouth service.

The opening assembly of the Summer School for 1941, will be held on Saturday evening at 7.30 o’clock

Passengers for regular points on the St. John’s-Lewisporte service will leave St. John’s at ten o’clock Saturday morning.

The Bay Roberts Guardian, states that quite a number of young men from that town have quite recently obtained employment as truck drivers at Argentia. The majority of them are new drivers, and quite recently obtained their licences.

A Seaman was before Court yesterday afternoon, charged with assaulting the Chief Officer of his ship. He was fined costs, and placed under bonds in the sum of $100.00. The Captain stated he would take up the matter of getting another ship for the man, from the agents. He did not want him on board.

A woman Shopkeeper of Water Street West, was before Court yesterday, charged with failing to declare all the liquor in her possession. The Police found two bottles of whiskey on her premises. Evidence was produced to show that the liquor belonged to some other person, and the woman did not know they were in the house. The case was dismissed.

Most of the Water Street stores closed at five o’clock yesterday afternoon, and this will be done every day during the months of July and August, except Saturdays. This is following the custom adopted two or three years ago. Nearly all the legal firms are closing their offices at the same time every day.

A Sailor and a twenty-year-old girl were before the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, charged with trespassing, and breaking into Henley’s Mattress Factory on Newtown Road. The Sailor was fined $5.00 and the girl $2.50. Mr. Henley stated that the door of the building had been forced open on several occasions, and four mattresses had been damaged. There was a danger of fire because of the large quantity of inflammable material around.

Passengers for the South Coast and Fortune Bay service will be leaving St. John’s at ten o’clock this morning.

A meeting of the executive of the Playgrounds Association will be held at the Newfoundland Hotel on Monday at 1.10 p.m.

Eight men who were charged with drunkenness, were before Court yesterday, and were find $1.00 each. One was found asleep on the sidewalk was fined $2.00. All arrested over the holiday.


July 4 1941 WEDDING St. John’s Joins Hands With Boston

In the quiet and peaceful setting of the beautiful Oratory of the Convent of Our Lady of Mercy, Military Road, on the afternoon of June 24th, a very pretty wedding took place, when Miss Ellen Mary Marshall, daughter of Mr. Mark and the late Susan Marshall, was joined in the Holy Bonds of Matrimony, to Mr. Thomas T. Merrill, of Boston, U.S.A.

The ceremony was performed by the Right Rev. Monsignor W.P.H. Kitchin, of the Archdiocese. The bride, who was given in marriage by her father, the well coxswain and skater, was a really fair daughter of Terra Nova, as she stood at the Altar, attired in a most attractive gown of ivory satin, veil of holland lace, white shoes and stockings, and carrying a beautiful bouquet of pale June roses. She was attended by her sister, Dorothy, as bridesmaid, who wore lemon organdie, with hat to match, and had a very attractive bouquet of carnations. Mr. Herbert Stenwood, of Boston, Mass, who, with his wife, came to the city especially for the wedding, acted in the capacity of best man.

The groom’s present to the bride was a gold bracelet, and to the bridesmaid a pearl neckless. A chrominium silver cigarette case was the best man’s souvenir of the event.

Following the ceremony, and after receiving the congratulations of the wedding party, Mr. and Mrs. Merrill drove to “Woodstock”, where the reception was held, and although skies were gray in the city, the sun broke through the clouds at Topsail, which must have given our American visitor a delightful impression of our local Brighton. Here the large umber of guests proved to be a happy party, and the night passed most pleasantly, leaving many fragrant memories.

After a delightful honeymoon spent in the picturesque sections of Conception Bay, during a period when the weather was kindly, Mr. and Mrs. Merrill returned to the city, where they are now residing at 148 Duckworth Street, and those who have had the pleasure of visiting their newly founded home, are convinced that they have happily and successfully embarked on the matrimonial sea.

The many friends of the contracting parties join in wishing the union of a daughter of Avalon to a son of Boston, every happiness. L.C.M.

July 4 1941 WEDDING BELLS MILLS — ASH: A very pretty wedding took place at Wesley United Church on Monday, June 30; when Ada Jean, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Ash, was united in holy bonds of matrimony to Reginald A. son of Albert and the late Eliza Mills, by the Rev. W.B. Perry, B.A., Pastor of the Church.

The bride was given in marriage by her father. She looked charming in a gown of white taffeta with shoulder length veil; the bouquet was of red carnations. Th bridesmaids, Miss Stella A., sister of the bride, and Miss Rita Mills, sister of the groom, were tastefully gowned in pale blue satin feta and rose taffeta respectively, with floral head-dress. The groom was attended by Mr. Herbert Crocker. The ushers were Mr. Eric Ash and Mr. Reginald James. The Organist of the Church, Mr. Bob R. McLeod, played appropriate wedding music. The bride’s mother wore a dress of periwinkle blue with black accessories, and a corsage of pink and white carnations. Mrs Mills wore a dress of black and white chiffon with accessories to match.

After the ceremony, the party motored to Donovan’s where the reception was held. When the usual toasts had been respected, dancing and musical items were introduced and very much enjoyed. A happy evening was brought to a close with the departure of the bride and groom for Woodstock, where the honeymoon will be spent.

The bride’s going away costume was navy blue with rose accessories.

July 4 1941 OBITUARY ALBERT E. O’REILLY: The Angel of death, called to his eternal reward on June 28th, Mr. Albert E. O’Reilly, a respected resident of Argentia for the past seventy-seven years.

Apparently in good health, in spite of his years, the late Mr. O’Reilly, accompanied by Mrs. O’Reilly and their daughter Monica, left St. John’s by rail for Boston, on June 20th where he expected to pass the remaining years of his life with his children. God however, ordained otherwise, and just before arriving at Grand Falls, Mr. O’Reilly suffered a severe attack of pneumonia and had to be rushed to Hospital, where the rites of the Catholic Church were administered by Rev. Father Finn, Parish Priest of Grand Falls. All that medical care could do was done by the Hospital Staff, but death came three days later.

Mr. O’Reilly had the grace and happiness of having his only son, the Rev. Dr. P.J. O’Reilly, Vice-Rector of St. Joseph Seminary, Edmonton, Alberta, present at his death bed. Burial service took place from the Church of the Immaculate Conception, Grand Falls. The last prayers were recited by Rev. Father Finn.

On Monday morning, June 30th the Office of the Dead was sung by Rev. W. Finn, assisted by Rev. J. Hogan, P.P., Bishop’s Falls. Rev. J. McCarthy assisted at Grand Falls and Rev. P.J. O’Reilly. A solemn High Mass of Requiem then followed, which was celebrated by the Rev Dr. O’Reilly, with Father Finn as Deacon and Father McCarthy as sub-Deacon. Rev. Father Hogan was Master of Ceremonies.

Burial took place in the Catholic cemetery at Grand Falls. The pall-bearers, all friends at Argentia of the late Mr. O’Reilly, were James Power, James Murphy, Alphonsus Power, John McCugh, John Collins and Thomas McCugh.

Mr. O’Reilly is survived by his wife and eight children; Mrs. John Dolan, Lynn, Mass., Mrs. James Foley, Mrs. Herman Saunders, Mrs. William Houlihan, Mrs. Peter Foley, all of New Bedford Mass., Miss Monica O’Reilly, Brooklyn, N.Y., and Rev. P.J. O’Reilly D.D. Edmonton, Alberta. Two sisters and two brothers also survive; Sister Mary Cecilia of the Mercy Order, Bell Island, Mrs. Rose Power of Argentia, Mr. Philip O’Reilly of Argentia, and Mr. Thomas O’Reilly of Boston, Mass.

To the sorrowing members of the family, sympathy is extended.

July 4 1941 ANNOUNCEMENT Mr. and Mrs. George A. Taylor, Halifax, announces the engagement of their daughter, Shelia Ann, to Lieutenant Charles K Duncan, U.S.N, of Lonnoxville, Kentucky. The wedding will take place in latter part of July.
July 4 1941 MARRIED MILLS — ASH: On Monday June 30th, at Wesley United Church, by the Rev. W.B. Perry, B.A., Ada Jean, daughter of Mr. and Mrs William Ash, to Reginald A., son of Albert and the late Mrs. Mills, both of this city.
July 4 1941 DEATHS KAVANAGH — Suddenly; at 9 o’clock last night, Mary J. Doherty, beloved wife of the late John Kavanagh. She leaves to mourn 6 nieces, 4 nephews and several grandchildren. The funeral takes place from her late residence 28 Bond Street tomorrow Saturday at 2.30 p.m.

HAYNES — Passed peacefully away on Wednesday morning, July 2nd, after a long and painful illness, Jane, beloved wife of Edward Hayes and daughter of the late John and Ann Griffin. Left to mourn are a husband, two daughters, Margaret of New Jersey and Catherine at home; four sons, John at Carmelite Monastery Oklahoma, Thomas, James, and Michael at home; also one sister, Mrs. G. Conway, Kenna’s Hill; three brothers, John and Michael of the U.S.A., and Thomas at home. Funeral on Friday at 2.30 p.m. from her late residence 414 South Side Road West. R. I. P. 

July 4 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE A very fine dance was held at the Arena last night which was enjoyed by a large turnout of dance fans. Mickey Duggan’s orchestra furnished a very popular program.

On Empire Avenue, 432 feet of six-inch cast iron pipe have been laid and backfilled, by employees of the Council.

The F.G.A. are holding an informal dance tonight at Bishops Feild College Hall. Gordon Foley’s orchestra will be in attendance. No single tickets will be sold.

The final game of the series of card tournaments will be played at the Star Hall tonight. Cash prizes will be offered. The hour for starting has been changed to 9.30.

At Queen Street, 304 lineal feet of curb and gutter and 141 feet of concrete sidewalk were laid in the past week. In addition, 143 feet of old sidewalk were broken up, and 30 feet ground is ready for new concrete sidewalk.

At Summerside, salmon were plentiful during the past week and especially on last Thursday, when Mr. J. Antle caught forty-six in his net.

The St. George’s Correspondent of the Western Star stated that the storm of the past week played havoc with our lobster and salmon fishermen on the outside shore, which will no doubt close the lobster fishery for the season. The fishermen are still doing well with salmon, one party having secured 60 salmon in one day.


July 6 1941 OBITUARY Mrs. JAMES BISHOP: (Point la Haye) On Sunday, June 15th, the Grim Reaper made a call at Point la Haye. St. Mary’s, and claimed one of the most prominent ladies of that section, and one who was well known not only in St. Mary’s Bay, but by many people from other sections of the country. Mrs. James J. Bishop had suffered for a lengthy period, but she bore her trial with Christian resignation to the Divine Will, and when the call came it found her ready and willing.

Her husband, who was a well known planter, predeceased her some time. He was prominent in that section, having been a most successful planter who prosecuted the fishery with the most modern equipment, and whose energy and industry were rewarded. He also operated a general store at Point la Haye and was one of the leading men in that section of the country. Mrs. Bishop was the ideal wife and help-mate, and she took the deepest interest in all her husband’s activities, whilst at the same time she operated a tea-room which was most popular with visitors, and where her hospitably and kindliness made her many friends. A large number of people from St. John’s had reasons to know how well conducted this place was.

But despite her many activities, Mrs. Bishop found time to take interest in Church and community work, and in these endeavors she was always prominently identified. She was a kindly neighbor and her charity and good works knew no bounds. Point la Haye and indeed all St. Mary’s Bay, is poorer because of her passing, and that the good she did was recognized, was given evidence of in the large attendance at her funeral obsequies.

She leaves to mourn; one adopted daughter, and to her the sympathy of friends everywhere is being extended.

July 6 1941 OBITUARY Mrs. ELIZABETH HORAN: After a tedious illness of over four years, borne with Christian resignation, there passed away at her home, South Side, Mrs. Elizabeth Horan, relict of the late Patrick Horan, of Tipperary, Ireland, who was well known in the dry goods business in the city in the days gone by.

The late Mrs. Horan (nee Miss McGrath of this city) belonged to a respectable family, the well known owners of the Tremont Hotel, Water St. The deceased was a woman of exemplary character whose beautiful ideals were reflected in the members of her model family whose filial devotion to a loving mother was so evident in her years of illness. During this trying time the nobility of her character was more than ever manifest, and daily she resigned herself in the hands of God and faced the inevitable with the courage of the valiant woman. Outstanding among her varied gifts, was her great fund of charity which was ever bestowed on the poor in a quite unassuming way. Only the Recording Angel could be aware of her many charitable benefactions dispensed, dispensed so unostentatiously. The deceased lady in her early years was ever an active worker in Church and educational activities.

A deeply religious atmosphere permeated the home of the late Mrs. Horan, and a spirit of holy prayer made her large family circle very happy among themselves, and kind and considerate to all their neighbors without exception .

In her youth she attended the Academy of Our Lady of Mercy, and was noted for her natural gifts and talents, which made her the ideal of her early school companions and teachers, nearly all of whom have passed to the great beyond.

In her lengthened suffering she had the constant care and great attention of her spiritual guide and friend, Rev. E.P. Maher, whose frequent visits were a source of much happiness and consolation. All that medical science could bestow was given by Dr. Cluny Macpherson, C.M.G., for many years the devoted Physician of the family.

Fortified by the rites of the Holy Church, she passed peacefully to her heavenly home on June 25th in the 73rd year of her age. She leaves to mourn her passing, Jeremiah, Thomas (veteran of the Great War) Malachy, Cornelius; another son Lawrence (also a Great War Veteran) predeceased her two years ago: Mrs. W.B. Skinner, Mrs. R. Trainor, Mrs. John Ryan, of New York, and Mary at home, to all of whom the sincere sympathy of many friends is extended.

July 6 1941 IN MEMORIAM FITZGERALD — In fond and loving memory of our dear husband and father, John Fitzgerald, who departed this life July 5th, 1940. May the Sacred heart of Jesus have mercy on his soul. — Inserted by his wife and children.
July 6 1941 DEATHS TAYLOR — Passed peacefully away at 4 p.m. Friday, Martha Elizabeth, beloved wife of James P. Taylor; left to mourn are husband, one daughter, Jennie (Mrs. J.G. Ball), one son, Wallace, one brother Charles Taylor, and one niece Doris Taylor, one son-in-law Rev. J.G. Ball. The funeral will take place from her late residence 21 Campbell Avenue , at 2.30 p.m. Sunday.
July 6 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE At a meeting of the Bakery Workers Union which will be held tonight, a wage scale and agreement will be discussed.

A special train leaving St. John’s at 6.30 a. m. Wednesday next, will make connection at Lewisporte for the Green Bay service. The overland Limited, leaving tomorrow evening will make connection at Lewisporte for the Green Bay service.

A woman who was given in charge by another woman for being drunk in her home, appeared before Court yesterday, but was discharged for the want of prosecution.

A Seaman, who was convicted for obstructing Constable Driscoll in the discharge of his duty, was fined $10 or 14 days, at the Magistrate’s Court yesterday. The man who was being arrested was convicted for being drunk and disorderly and using profane language, and he was also fined $10 or 14 days. The Constable handcuffed both men together and took them to the station, in a taxi.

Passengers for the Labrador service as far as Hopedale will be leaving St. John’s at three o’clock this afternoon.


July 7 1941 MARRIAGE KREIGER — KELLY: Married at R.C. Cathedral July 5th by the Rt. Rev. Mons. Kitchen, Kyra Marie Kelly of this city, to Roy Krieger, International Falls, Minnesota, U.S.A.
July 7 1941 DEATHS OLIPHANT — Passed peacefully away at St. Claire’s Mercy Hospital Sunday, July 6th after a long illness, Mrs. Annie Oliphant, beloved wife of the late George L. Oliphant; leaving to mourn their sad loss are; two sons, Douglas at home, and Jack at Massachusetts, U.S.A. Funeral takes place this afternoon at 2.30 from her late residence 4 Maxie Street.
July 7 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE The Fishermen’s Advocate states that Mr. J.W. Fraser of Job Bros. & Co., Ltd. has arrived at Bonavista to manage the cold storage filleting plant there. Mr. Moore who has spent sone time there installing new cold storage machinery, is returning to St. John’s.

Visitors to Beachy Cove and other places in Conception Bay yesterday, were interested in watching the caplin on the beaches. The water was literally black with the little fish, and some people who were swimming, found it not so pleasant because of so many caplin.


July 8 1941 WEDDING BELLS THORBURN — SHANNAHAN: A very pretty wedding took place at the R.C. Church, Windsor, on Tuesday morning past at 9 a.m. when Reverend Father Meaney, P.P. united in matrimony, Miss Eileen Shannahan, R.N. of Harbor Grace and Mr. Ted Thorburn of St. John’s.

The bride was beautiful, gowned in white embodied marquisette, with shoulder and halo of orange blossoms. She carried a bouquet of roses and carnations. Miss Kitty Connors was bridesmaid, and wore a charming gown of pink crepe satin, with halo of pink ribbon and lace intertwined, and carried a bouquet of carnations and maidenhair fern. The bride’s trainbearers were little Gertrude Hannon of Badger, who wore pale pink and carried a basket of mixed flowers, and Master Albert Newhook, also of Badger, who was attired in white satin pants and shirt, and navy blue blazer. The groom was supported by his brother, Mr. Paul Thorburn of St. John’s. As the bride entered the Church on the arm of Mr. P.J. Connors, who acted as father-giver, Miss Beatrice Connors played Lohengrin’s Wedding March. During the offertory of the Nuptial Mass which preceded the marriage ceremony , Miss Connors gave an organ solo of “Oh, Promise Me.”

A wedding breakfast was held in Badger at the home of the young couple, and Mrs. Hannon was in charge. Toasts were drunk to the newly married pair, and interesting and entertaining speeches were given by Reverend Father Meaney, Mr. H. Cole, Mr. P.J. Connors and Mr. Hedley White. The house was tastefully decorated for the occasion and a guard of honor was formed by the Boy Scouts, which organization was promoted in Badger by the groom.

The bride, prior to her marriage, was a very successful member of the Nursing profession, while the groom had been a Ranger at Badger during the past couple of years, and has been held in the highest esteem there by all classes and creeds.

The bride’s going away costume was a very pretty ensemble with navy accessories and a beautiful silver fox, a gift from the groom. A brief honeymoon is being spent in Millertown as guests of Dr. and Mrs. Strong.

During the afternoon, a reception was held, and numerous friends from Badger and Grand Falls attended. At night, a dance was given in the Rose Marie Tearooms, and this was largely attended.

The young couple was the recipients of many costly and beautiful presents. The groom’s gift to the bridesmaid was an embossed vanity case, and to the best man gold cuff links, and to the small attendants, mother of pearl Rosaries.

Mr. and Mrs. Thorburn will reside at Badger.

July 8 1941 OBITUARY Mrs. EDWARD BARBOUR: Newtown, B.B. There passed away at Newtown, Friday afternoon, Mrs. Edward Barbour, perhaps the best known and most beloved woman on the North side of Bonavista Bay.

Born at Flowers Island on the 2nd day of July 75 years ago, her father was John Kean, the second eldest brother of mine. Her mother was Ruth Knee, a sister of the late Capt. William Knee of sealing fame, during the latter part of the last century. If I remember rightly, she never saw her father alive. He was brought home from Labrador by his brothers, and died before reaching home, a little over a month after she was born. Her only brother to reach manhood is Capt. Job Kean of Brookfield, their father having died when they were both young, and left them fatherless. I took both of them under my care and they stayed at my home until they were married. Mrs. Barbour never had the advantage of a good education but made the very best use of what little she had, she was a good reader and was most remarkable for remembering what she read.

She married Edward Barbour of Newtown and their marriage was a great success. To them was born seven children, her eldest son Lester, to whom she gave her last measurer of devotion, paid the supreme sacrifice for King and Country on the Last War, and when his brother Job got blown across the ocean in the November gale of 1929, he visited Flanders Field in France, and placed a wreath on his brother’s grave. Although her husband predeceased her several years ago, the love and care she bestowed upon these children was such, that she had the proud satisfaction of knowing that her devotion was not misplaced, for the children in return, served her with a love which may be equaled, but never was surpassed.

Having been possessed with a large share of the world’s goods, her home may be best described by Kipling’s description of the home by the side of the road; no one ever entered her home but must have been reminded of the old adage of the hospitality of the Newfoundland people. I can well imagine that hundreds at the grave side will think of the atmosphere of that home in which they spent so many pleasant hours. I am delighted I visited her a little over a month ago. She and her two daughters gave the same welcome; it could be no other but home-like while she managed it.

But the end has come, her last devotion to duty has been paid, and very soon all that is mortal of Mrs. Mary Jane Barbour (as she was favorably known) will be committed to mother earth. It is my firm conviction (unpopular as that doctrine has become) her soul has returned to God that gave it. And in due time, she will hear the welcome words, “Well done thou good and faithful servant, thou has been faithful over a few things, I will make thee ruler over many things, enter thou into the joy of thy Lord.” A KEAN. Anchorage, Feb. 4th, 1941

July 8 1941 WEDDING BELLS CHANNING — MURPHY: The marriage took place yesterday morning at nine o’clock in St. Raphael’s Chapel, Mount Cashel, of Mary, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W.J. Murphy, to James, son of Mrs. F.G. and the late Jas. J. Channing. The marriage ceremony was performed by Rev. Fr. P.J. Kennedy, cousin of the groom, and was followed by Nuptial Mass, which was celebrated by Rev. Fr. Kennedy, assisted by Rev. Fr. T.J. Pride. The groom’s nephew, W.A. Carew assisted in the serving of the Mass.

The bride was given in marriage by her father. She was dressed in cornflower blue crepe, and wore a pale pink headdress with matching accessories. Her corsage consisted of pale pink roses and maidenhair fern. The bridesmaid, Miss Joan Murphy, sister of the bride, wore beige crepe with accessories to match, and a corsage of multi-colored sweetpeas. The bride’s mother was dressed in mauve and white crepe with matching accessories, and wore a corsage of white carnations, whilst the groom’s mother, wore a navy blue ensemble with white accessories. Her corsage was of pink and white carnations. The groom was attended by Dr. G.J. Eagan.

As the bride entered and left the Chapel, the wedding March was played by Mr. Ignatius Rumboldt.

After the ceremony, a reception was held at “Glenbrook,” Torbay Road, the residence of the bride’s parents, during which the customary toasts were duly honored. Following the reception the bride and groom left for the Avalon Peninsula. The bride’s going away costume was an ensemble of navy blue and white.

The many friends of the newly wedded couple, will unite in wishing them every happiness and good fortune in the future.

July 8 1941 MARRIAGES GRIFFIN — REID: At Roanoke, Virginia, on May 8th, 1941, by the Rev. E.N. Tarpley, Harriet Jean Reid, daughter of Mr. Walter Reid and the late Mrs. Reid, to Dr. Thomas L. Griffin of Roanoke, Virgina, U.S.A.

CANNING — MURPHY: At St. Raphael’s Church, Mount Cashel, on Monday, July 7th, by Rev. Fr. P.J. Kennedy, Mary Sarah Murphy, to James Gregory Channing, both of this city.

July 8 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE A dance will be held at the Arena tonight and music will be provided by Mickey Duggan and his orchestra.

The express train leaving this afternoon will make connection at Port aux Basques for the South coast and Fortune Bay route.

A laborer was before Court yesterday, charged with causing a disturbance in his home, and he was ordered to sign bonds.

Two boys were before Court yesterday for stealing coal from the Railway Yard. They were put under bonds.

A Naval man was fined $3.00 yesterday for creating a disturbance in a theatre. Another who pulled down a sign on New Gower Street, was fined $2.00.

A special train leaving tomorrow morning at 8.30 will make connection at Argentia for the Bay route of Placentia Bay.

A sixteen-year-old boy was before Court yesterday, and was fined fifty cents for riding a bicycle without holding the handle bars.

A meeting of Terra Nova Council No. 1452 Knights of Columbus, will be held tonight at Columbus Club. The special business is the election of officers.

Refined sugar in stock in Canadian refineries on May 17th totaled 137,370,149 lbs compared with 112,370,470 lbs a year ago. Raw sugar stocks amounted to 84,655,497 lbs. Against 92,503,399 lbs. in 1940. — Nfld Trade Review.

July 8 1941 ODDITIES Men who thought they might beat the clothes rationing by wearing a “Dickey” (separate shirt front) and a couple of cuffs instead of an “eight coupon shirt”, are frustrated. The dickey now rates as “undergarments” — four coupons

Because of a great medley of tongues, the artificial language Esperanto, is much used in the Russian city of Odessa.

Britain’s famed Lawrence of Arabia was rejected for front line duty in the First Great War, because of anemia and short stature.

The cod is one of the most prolific of fishes, a female 39 to 40 inches long producing about 3,000,000 eggs,

Three United States Presidents were of Dutch ancestry, Martin Van Buren, Theodore Roosevelt, and Franklin Roosevelt.


July 11 1941 WEDDING BELLS MOORE — POWER: The R.C Cathedral was the scene of a very pretty wedding last evening, when Miss Mary Power, daughter of Mrs. Mary S. and the late Edward Power, of Nagel’s Hill, was united to Mr. Phillip Moore, son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Philip Moore of this city. The ceremony was performed by Rev. R. McD Moore, in the presence of a large number of friends of the young couple.

The bride entered the Cathedral leaning on the arm of her uncle, Mr. John Clouston, who acted as father giver. She was charmingly attired in ivory satin with flowing veil and coronet of lilies of the valley, and carried a bouquet of carnations, sweet peas and maiden hair fern. Mrs. Thomas Murphy, her sister, acted as matron of honor, and her dress was of blue silk taffeta, and she carried a bouquet of sweet peas and maiden hair fern. The bride’s mother wore a dress of black satin. Mr. Thomas G. Moore, brother of the groom, acted as best man.

Following the ceremony, the wedding party drove around Bowring Park and thence to Smithville, where the reception was held. A sumptuous repast had been prepared by the Proprietress of Smithville, and following this, toasts were honored to the bride and groom, to the matron of honor, and to the bride’s mother.

Mr. Moore, who was formerly of the office of A.S. Rendell & Co. of this city, is now a member of the staff of the shipping branch of Bowaters Newfoundland Ltd., at Corner Brook, and this afternoon, he and his bride leave for Corner Brook to take up residence.

Their many friends will join in extending congratulations and very best wishes for their future health and happiness over a long period.

July 11 1941 OBITUARY FRED RALPH: It came as a severe shock to his numerous friends on Bell Island and elsewhere last week, that Mr. Fred Ralph, well known Merchant of the West Mines, had passed away on June 23rd. His death occurred suddenly, for although the late Mr. Ralph had been in failing health for some time, he appeared no worse than usual that day, and his sudden passing came as a grievous blow to his widow and his mother, brother and sisters.

Deceased was a native of Clarke’s Beach, and his death occurred at the early age of 44 years. He has been a resident of Bell Island for the past 27 years. In his younger days he worked very hard, and six years ago he started out in business for himself at the West Mines, building up a very substantial and successful grocery trade, so that he came to be recognized in recent years as one of the leading Merchants of the Island.

The late Mr. Ralph was well liked by all who knew him. As a business man, he had a reputation of the highest integrity, being honest, upright and reliable in all his dealings. He was very generous and kind hearted, and no appeal for assistance made to him ever fell on deaf ears. Many people today mourn the loss of a true friend in the lamented passing of the late Fred Ralph.

Some years ago, while on a trouting trip, he lost his way on the Witless Bay Line, and was not found for four days and nights. The exposure and excitement of that time are said to have shortened his life, and helped to bring about his untimely end. On April 21st this year, he was taken to Hospital in the city for treatment, and since his return home he had been confined to his room. He was able however, to take an interest in his business to the last, although no longer able to go out.

The funeral took place on Wednesday, June 25th at Clarke’s Beach, the last rites being conducted by Rev. Woolfrey, of Bell Island, and Rev. Shirran of Clarke’s Beach. Interment was in Clarke Beach,

Surviving are his sorrowing widow and mother, Mrs. Maria Ralph, at Clarke’s Beach; three sisters, Mrs. Jacob Noseworthy and Mrs. Tobias Mercer on Bell Island, and Mrs. Margaret Leras of Portsmouth, New York; and two brothers, John in Toronto and Hubert at home. To one and all this paper extends sincere sympathy in their great bereavement. — Bell Islander.

July 11 1941 MARRIAGES MOORE — POWER: At the R.C. Cathedral on Wednesday, July 9th by Rev. R. McD. Murphy, Mary, daughter of Mrs. Mary S. and the late Edward Power, to Philip, son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Philip Moore.

THORBURN — SHANNAHAN: On June 24th, at the R.C. Church, Windsor, with Nuptial Mass by Rev. Fr. Meaney, P.P., Edward P. Thorburn, son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J Thorburn, of St. John’s, and Miss Eileen Shannahan, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ronald T. Shannahan, of Harbor Grace.

July 11 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE Tennis tournaments for the Avalon Cup will be played at the Aero Tennis Club courts, Harbor Grace.

A tennis dance under auspices of the Aero Tennis club, will be held at Academy Hall, Harbor Grace tomorrow night. Dancing will begin at 9.30 and supper will be served at 11 o’clock.

A Magisterial Enquiry into the cause of the death of an American Soldier, was continued before Magistrate O’Neill yesterday afternoon. The evidence of Dr. Josephson, Government Pathologist, was taken.

Previous to the outbreak of war, large quantities of fish hooks came from Norway, but of course these were shut off after Norway was invaded. There is now a shortage, but wholesalers are hoping to secure a supply from England.

The express train leaving this evening will make connection at Lewisporte for the St. John-Lewisporte service.

The premises of F. McNamara Ltd. were decorated with bunting yesterday, in honor of the wedding of Miss E. McNamara, daughter of Hon. F. and Mrs. McNamara.

Passengers for the South Coast St. Pierre-Halifax service, will leave St. John’s at 5 p.m, tomorrow, Friday, instead of on the regular day.

The regular weekly meeting at the Council will be held this afternoon, and some interesting subjects are expected to be discussed, including the Auditor General’s report.


July 13 1941 NOTE OF THANKS The following survivors of the S.S. Marconi, who are due to leave St. John’s, Messrs, Appleby, Finch, McGregor, Suffling, and Waugh, wish to tender their appreciation and thanks to Doctors, Sisters, and Nurses of St. Claire’s and Grace Hospitals, the W.P.A., and Canadian Red Cross, the staff of the Crosbie Hotel, and the residents of St. John’s, for the kindness shown them during their sojourn at St. John’s
July 13 1941 DEATHS PEARCE — Passed peacefully away at 6.15 p.m. July 10th, Jean beloved wife of Arthur Pearce, in her thirty-third year;leaving to mourn their sad loss, husband and five children, also father, four brothers and three sisters. Funeral from her father-in-law’s residence. 20 Cairo Street, on Saturday at 2.30 p.m.
July 13 1941 IN MEMORIAM Mrs. D. WILLIAMS: To hearts of woe, “Thought and impulse while they flow, can no comfort bring” and there are hearts weighed down by woe, at the present sudden death in the prime of life Anna, the well beloved wife of Daniel J. Williams of this city. Now, in this loss of our friend, as in the song about “The Heart Bowed Down,” there is among all the desolation that it tells, one only solace: this solace is in the words; “But memory is the only friend that grief can call its own.” Memory, if it may yet as soon after her passing, console, can be a friend to our grief; for it is consolingly true that we did make her known in life, how dear she was to us all. Or to put it in another way, we did not wait until her death made it too late for us her friends, to show her our esteem. Because Anna Williams was so good and kind and fair, and so gentle, rare indeed and high, was the esteem she won.

To her sorrowing husband and children, and to her two brothers and one sister, the writer offers heartfelt sympathy. Ad VALOREM. Badger, July 8th, 1941.

July 13 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE The Stephenville Crossing Correspondent of the Western Star, states that very little real summer weather has been experienced this season, in fact, for several successive nights there was keen frost, and in many cases the farmers lost their small seeded crops, necessitating re-sowing.

To date 456 feet of 8 inch cast iron pipe, have been laid in Empire Avenue, and 192 feet 6 inch cast iron pipe in Freshwater Road, by Council employed.

A man, who was charged with being drunk and misconducting himself on the public street, was fined $5.00, and placed under bonds yesterday, at the Magistrate’s Court.

Passengers for the South Coast–St Pierre–Halifax service will be leaving St. John’s at five o’clock this evening.

The train leaving on Monday morning will make connection at Argentia for the Western route of Placentia Bay.

The Overland Limited on Sunday will make connection at Lewisporte for the Green Bay route.

The City Engineer reported at yesterday’s Council meeting, that excavating and laying of the 12 inch earthenware sewer in Freshwater Road is progressing favorably, and during the past week, 300 feet of pipe were laid and backfilled.

About three hundred cases of salmon have been shipped from St. George’s to date, according to the Western Star.

Since July, weather conditions at Port aux Basques have been better than they had been previously, though the nights are still cold.


July 14 1941 OBITUARY Mrs. WILLIAM THOMAS KEEPING: NORTH SYDNEY, July 7th — A host of friends and elsewhere, were shocked and regretful as they learned of the sudden death of Mrs. William Thomas Keeping, 58, who died at her home on Pleasant Street late last Sunday afternoon, after an illness of less than a day.

Well known and highly respected here, the deceased suffered a severe stroke early Saturday night, and then failed to regain consciousness, with the exception of a five minute period just after the fatal attack, with the passing taking place at 3.30 o’clock yesterday afternoon..

In her usual good health, Mrs. Keeping had been about town on Saturday, and news of her sudden demise came as a great shock not only to her family, but to her many friends. The deceased was a daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Ambrose Fiander, and was born at English Harbor West, Fortune Bay, Newfoundland. She had resided in North Sydney for the past 18 years.

She was the Worshipful Mistress of the local order of the L.O.B.A. Organization, and also a member of Church, and a member of other organizations of that Church.

In addition to her husband, she is also survived by one daughter, Mrs. Gordon Green, Upper North Sydney, and one son William, at home. A number of other relatives reside in Newfoundland. — Sydney Post Records.

July 14 1941 BIRTHS O’NEILL – At St. Claire’s Mercy Hospital on Sunday, July 13th, to Mary B. (Firth), wife of John W. O’Neill, a son.

WHELAN — At the Grace Hospital on July 12th to Muriel , wife of H.M. Whelan, a daughter.

HAYWARD — On July 12th at St. Claire’s Mercy Hospital, a son to Beatrice (Caldwell) wife of Gerald Hawyard.

July 14 1941 DEATHS PURCELL — Passed peacefully away at the Sanitorium, July 13th, Ruth, darling daughter of Elizabeth and Sylvester Purcell, aged 19 years, leaving father and mother, 8 sisters, 2 brothers, to mourn their sad loss. Funeral to take place Tuesday at 2.30 p.m., from her late residence 66 Livingstone Street. May the Sacred Heart of Jesus have mercy on her soul. (American and Canadian papers please copy).

WITHERS — Died at the Grace Hospital on Saturday, July 12th, Angela Withers, age one year and ten months, darling child of John and Mary Withers, Temperance Street.

July 14 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE The drawing for special prizes in the Holy Cross sweep took place on Saturday night, and the winning numbers are in the advertising columns today.

At some places along the Southern Shore fish is plentiful, but at others none is being secured. At Witless Bay last week it was impossible to get a fish for a meal.

Celebrations of the 4th of July were held at the Stephenville Bases, and American citizens residing on the West Coast were invited. Many people from Corner Brook attended. The program consisted of a rally from 4 to 5 p.m. a tea dance from 5 to 6.30 p.m., buffet supper from 7. to 9 p.m., and a dinner dance from 9 p.m to 1 a.m. — Western Star.

There is plenty of codfish around Port Union, so the Fishermen’s Advocate states. Mr. Dave Norman who is trawling, secured eight quintals on fifteen lines last Wednesday. Reports from Melrose indicate good fishing there.

The improved conditions of the road between Stephenville Crossing and Port au Port, has induced several persons to make investments in motor cars. The great pity is that a regular bus service has not been undertaken between the railroad and the Base. — Western Star.

Passengers for the South Coast St. Pierre -Halifax service, will leave St. John’s on Wednesday morning at ten o’clock. Argentia will not be included.

The Bonavista Correspondent of the Fishermen’s Advocate, states that at that place there is plenty of fish although there are no very large catches as yet. Trapmen are not doing so well but hook and line men are meeting with fair success. Catches are around 20 quintals. Most or practically all of the codfish will be dried, as it is considered more profitable at the present time, to make fish for the dried fish market, than to sell to cold storage filleting plants.

The usual dance will be held at the Yacht Pavilion tonight. Music will be supplied by Walter Chambers’ orchestra.

Monthly meetings of the St. John’s T.A. & B. Society have been suspended for the months of July and August.

Three youths were before the Magistrate’s Court on Friday, charged with assault and battery. The evidence was that they visited Wing Fong’s Café, Water Street West, and purchased two bottles of beer. When one of the accused finished drinking the bottle, he hit the Waitress on the head, and both got over the counter, and took some cigarettes and chewing gum. Complaint was made to Constables Driscoll and Morrissey, who later arrested the accused at another café. They were convicted of the charge but sentence was suspended, as another charge is pending against one of them.

Council employees are now building a concrete wall and sidewalk on Casey Street, at the junction of LeMarchant Road. They are also laying a concrete sidewalk on Pleasant St.

A truck driver was before Court on Friday and was charged with carrying a heavier load than permitted. He pleaded guilty. A Constable giving evidence stated that he saw the truck proceeding up Cochrane Street with fresh meat on it. There was a truck towing the loaded one and another was pushing from behind. He stated the truck was overloaded by about 6,000 lbs. The accused was fined $5.00

Twenty four logging camps have now started the 1941 pulpwood cut, and up to last weekend, 1000 men were employed. Cutting pulp wood in the summer months was hardly ever attempted in this Country until about six years ago. At the present time it is looked upon as a regular or normal operation, in fact the summer season seems to be a more suitable time for cutting. The wood when cut, dries out more quickly and is in better condition for river driving and booming, with much lower percentage of loss from sinking in the brooks in the drive. — Western Star


July 15 1941 WEDDING BELLS WHITEWAY — WOOD: At St. Thomas’s Church yesterday afternoon, the marriage took place of William Evan, son of Dr. S.P. and Mrs. Whiteway, and Mildred Helen, youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W.E. Wood, the ceremony being performed by Rev. Canon Howitt, Rector

The Bride, who was given in marriage by her father, wore a gown of white lace, with train, and carried a sheaf bouquet of pink and white carnations and maiden hair fern, and was attended by Mrs. C.D.T. Sparshott, who wore a floor length frock of blue taffeta, touched with soft pink, and small matching hat, and carried a posey of sweet peas and maiden hair fern. The best man was Mr. W.E. Curtis and Mrs. E.C. Wood was usher.

The bride’s mother wore an ensemble of navy blue and white, and a corsage of sweet peas of varied hues, and the groom’s mother was attired in a gown of summer print with accessories of dark blue, with a corsage of pink and white carnations.

After the ceremony, a reception was held at Woodstock when Rev. Canon Howitt proposed the toast to the bride and groom which was replied to by the groom, who proposed the toast to the bridesmaid, and Mr. W.E. Curtis replied.

The bride and groom left for Brigus, where a part of the honeymoon will be spent, the bride going away in a print dress of summer crepe, with turban to match, and redingote of blue with accessories matching.

July 15 1941 NOTE OF THANKS Mrs. Thomas Mackay and family, Holyrood, wish to thank all kind friends who helped in any way to alleviate their sorrow, in the death of a dear husband and father, especially those who sent Mass Cards, Telegrams, Letters of Sympathy, Telephone Calls, and Sympathy cards: Rev. Father Murphy, P.P., Holyrood, Monsignor Murphy, Brigus, Rev. Fr. Terry, Hr. Grace, Sr. M. Dominic, St. Mary’s, Miss Betty Cousins, Cape Broyle, Mr. G.R. Williams, Staff of Rothwell and Bowring’s, Messrs Ayre & Sons and staff, St. John’s, Mr and Mrs. Rubert Molloy, Miss Bertha Penney, Boston, Miss Ella O’Brien, Miss Veronica Lannon, Mr. and Mrs. G.R. Davis, New York, Mr and Mrs Barth Corbett, Sydney, C.B., Mr William O’Brien, England, Mr John Fitzgerald, and Miss Annie Hawco, Bell Island, Mr and Mrs Wm. Hawco, Mr and Mrs. John Mason and family, Hr. Main, Mrs. Patrick Crawley and family, Mrs M.C. Dunphy, Mrs. M.A O’Neil, Mr and Mrs Wm. Walsh, Miss Margaret Lewis, Mr and Mrs Stephen Mason and family, Holyrood.

Mr and Mrs Edward Taylor and family, of Bristol’s Hope, wish to thank all those who sent messages and letters of sympathy, or in any way expressed their sympathy, in their recent sorrow, caused by the death of their son, Able Seaman James Taylor, who was killed in an air raid on May 8th last, while spending a furlough in Belfast, Ireland.

July 15 1941 MARRIAGE WHITEWAY — WOOD: At St. Thomas’s Church on Monday, July 14th, William Evan, son of Dr. S.P. and Mrs. Whiteway, to Mildred Helen, youngest daughter of W.E. and Mrs. Wood.
July 15 1941 DEATHS HAMMOND — Passed peacefully away, Henry Hammond, aged 78 years. Leaving to mourn one brother. Funeral to take place Wednesday at 2.30 p.m. from his late residence 8 Wood Street. “Father in Thy gracious keeping leave we now Thy servant sleeping.”
July 15 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE A Taximan was before Court yesterday, charged with peddling liquor at Camp Alexandra, and having in his possession a bottle, on which was a defaced label. He was fined $10 on each count. Lieut. Dillender, giving evidence, stated that men at the camp were being demoralized by the operations of bootleggers, who usually made deliveries in Pine Bud Lane. In order to cope with the trouble, he had a conference with the Chief of Police and the Assistant Chief, the result of which, he was instructed to detain any person found selling liquor on the roads adjacent to the camp. On Saturday, the accused was caught by one of the Military Police, and detained until the C.I.D. were communicated with. The accused said in defense, that the transaction was to oblige one of the men at the camp, and was not for profit. Counsel for the defense, questioned the right of the Chief of Police to delegate to the Military Authorities, any right to detain a citizen on a public highway.

Playground Committee announced that they have secured the service of a Physical Instructor for the summer, in the person of Mr Al Pittman. He will be present on the Sports Field every day from 2 p.m. to 9 p.m. during the months of July and August, to coach and supervise children in various games. This is free service to the community and should be availed of by all parents, so that their children may obtain the benefit of open air exercise in wholesome surroundings. — The Bell Islander.

The general quarterly meeting of the St. John’s War Service Association, (operating the Caribou Hut) will be held in the Board of Trade rooms tonight at eight o’clock. All interested in the work of the Caribou Hut are invited to attend.

Angus Caines, one of the pair who on Friday last was charged with assaulting a lady in a Chinese Café, was before Magistrate O’Neill charged with maliciously wounding a young lady, on the night of March 24th last. The evidence of the complainant was that on the night in question, she and a companion were passing Theater Hill, when suddenly a knife was thrown at her, and it stuck in her ankle. She was conveyed to a house on Moore Street and the Police were called, and later she was taken to Hospital. At the time that the knife hit her, no one was around, but the accused was standing on the corner. She saw the knife on the ground, and it was the same knife which she saw in the possession of the accused previously. He was convicted. Sentence will be imposed this morning, when sentence will also be passed for the previous charge against him.

The annual installation ceremony of Lodge McKay, 1129, Bay Roberts, will take place in the Lodge Room at Bay Roberts tomorrow night at eight o’clock. Representatives of District Grand Lodge and Sister Lodges will be attending the ceremony.

Ex-Constable THOMAS WADE of Conception Harbor, who was serving in the Mercantile Marine, has lost his life at sea, according to news recently received. Mr. Wade was attached to the Police Force on Bell Island for several years. – The Bell Islander.

Some eighteen cases for breaches of the Traffic Act were heard before Magistrate O’Neill at the Magistrate’s Court yesterday. Various fines were imposed.

The following passengers have arrived here from the St. John’s–Humbermouth route: — C.G. Manuel, Ranger E, Thoms, C. Colburne, L Hann, Miss L. Lush, Miss J. Banfield, Miss N. Elliott.

Passengers for the South Coast and Fortune Bay route will leave St. John’s at ten o’clock tomorrow morning. Argentia will not be included in the places called at.

Two men were before Court yesterday, charged with passing a worthless cheque to the value of $10.00, at the Belmont Tavern. The men made a fifty cent purchase and got $9.50 in change. Through a mistake, one of them got the cheque back and tore it up, but pieces were secured and put in evidence. The accused pleaded guilty and was fined $20.00 each. Both had court records. The $9.50 cash was recovered.

Owners and operators of boats, wishing to ply for hire or reward in the Harbor of St. John’s, are informed that application for licence forms and license to operate may be obtained, upon application at the office of the Harbor Master. Testimonial of character and competency must be produced when making the application. 


July 16 1941 OBITUARY ABRAHAM BARRETT (Sr.) Spaniard’s Bay.

“Oh Cross that followest all the way, I yield my flickering torch to Thee.”

The news of the passing of Abraham Barrett, more familiarly known as “Uncle Abe,” which occurred on Wednesday, June 25th, at 1 p.m., was received with great surprise and infinite sadness by his numerous friends. For although he had been in poor health, none dreamed that the end was drawing near, but He whose wisdom is beyond question, and whose holy will is always for the best, called him from the vale of tears to a Land where pain and sorrow are unknown. “Uncle Abe” was 81 years of age, and was well and favorably known in this community. He possessed many fine and sterling qualities of mind and heart, which could only be appreciated by those who knew him intimately. He leaves to mourn one son, Noah, of Mark Gosse and Sons, one daughter, Rose (Mrs. J.C. Oakley) of Bell Island, and one sister, Mrs Eliza Howe of Boston and several grandchildren. The large attendance at his funeral evidenced the high esteem in which he was held by all classes of the community. He was laid to rest in the C. of E. Cemetery. The Rev. E. Hunt officiated at the obsequies. As we look upon the cold earth, we know that this is not the end; that as long as the immortal words, “I am the resurrection and the life” ring among the tombs, there is the glorious hope of re-union beyond. The writer extends sincere sympathy to the bereaved.

“Give me the Bible lamp of life immortal, Hold up its splendor by the open grave, Show me the light by Heaven’s shining portal, Show me the gray gliding Jordan’s wave.” E.M.G. 

July 16 1941 DEATHS OAKELY — Passed peacefully away yesterday morning, Kenneth Oakely, aged 61 years, formerly of Greenspond, leaving wife, eight children, three grandchildren and three sisters. Funeral at 2.30 p.m. today, Wednesday, from his late residence, Raleigh Street.

CODNER — Entered into rest at Torbay on Monday July 14th, 1941, at 11.30 a.m., Richard Codner, aged 87 years; leaving to mourn their sad loss, one son, Ernest at Torbay, one daughter Mrs. J Petite, at Halifax, one sister Mrs. W.S. Codner also seven grandchildren. Funeral at Torbay today Wednesday at 3.30 p.m. 

July 16 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE Codfish is plentiful on the local grounds now, and fishermen are securing good catches, though most of it is a small run. Some of the men are selling it green for filleting, and some others will make it, in the hope of a better price this year.

Last week in the R.C. School at Windsor, a welcome home party was given in honor of four lads who were home on leave from the Navy. The affair was organized by the Women’s Patriotic Association of Windsor and was very successful.

Caplin are now scarce off St. John’s and fishermen are finding it difficult to get sufficient for bait purposes.

Sunday, July 20th, will be Annual Congress Sunday of the Salvation Army in Grand Falls. These meetings will be conducted by Commissioner Orames, and Brigadier Keith, the Young People’s Secretary, also Brigadier and Mrs. Acton, the new Provincial Officers for Newfoundland. These will be assisted by about forty of the field officers in Newfoundland. — Grand Falls Advertiser.

The annual picnic of Wesley United Church School will be held this afternoon on Cowan’s Field, Topsail Road. Refreshments and meat teas will be served in the afternoon and a bus will proceed to the field for the convenience of those who desire to attend.

A Canadian M.P. who appeared before Court on Monday, charged with being drunk and disorderly, pleaded not guilty and was convicted yesterday. He had stated that he took no beer or liquor on the day in question, but witnesses produced yesterday, testified to the contrary. He was fined $3.00.

The Memorial Service in Memory of the late Sir Wilfrid Grenfell, K.C.M.G., M.D. will be held in the Church of England Cathedral on Monday next, the 21st at 4 p.m.

The Newfoundland Lumbermen’s Association Convention opened at Grand Falls on Monday. It opened with a public meeting, held in Beaumont Hall, to which all citizens were invited.

The Chief of Police has outlined traffic regulations which apply to vehicles proceeding to and from Church of England Garden Party grounds, this afternoon, or whenever the event is held. Drivers would do well to familiarize themselves with these.

Passengers for the South Coast and Fortune Bay route will leave St. John’s at noon tomorrow. Calls will be made at Argentia.

Mr. R.G. Eldridge, Manager of the Bank of Montreal at Grand Falls, announces that a branch of the Bank will be opened at Botwood. This has been found necessary in view of the increased business of the Bank in the past months. The office will be in Connaught Hall, and Mr. T.A. Vaughan, who for the past few years has been on the Bank’s staff at Grand Falls, will be Accountant in charge. — Grand Falls Advertiser.

Angus Caines, who was charged with assaulting a waitress at a Chinese Café, of grievously wounding a young lady, on Theatre Hill, and with stealing from the Café above referred to, was convicted on all accounts yesterday. He was fined $20.00 for the assault on the Waitress, and $5.00 for disorderly conduct, as well as $20 for larceny. He was also fined $50 for wounding the other lady.


July 17 1941 IN MEMORIAM ELSIE CLARKE, Victoria: A sustained struggle for life that was a true epic of courage and fortitude, came to an end on Monday , June 9th 191, when Elsie Clarke, eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Reuben Clarke (of the firm of R. &. W. Clarke), Victoria, Carbonear, entered into rest at the early age of 26 years. Nearly half that short span of life had been marred, and constantly threatened by that dread disease tuberculosis, and it was only through sheer strength of spirit that the fight was so prolonged. The grim reaper triumphed over the tired body when time had taken its toll; but the great spirit and soul of Elsie Clarke still lives.

Throughout her long illness, which first made its presence felt when she was a school girl, Elsie was the perfect example of the unselfish sufferer, never giving her devoted mother and the family any more trouble than she could help, and always sparing the thoughts and feeling of her friends who loved her. The bright bedroom on the corner, now so tragically empty, was for years the meeting place of a steady stream of sympathizers. Normal people, blessed with health and strength, they came, feeling sorry for the girl who lay in bed fighting for her life, they went away themselves cheered, and glowing with the radiance the sick girl invariably spread about her. More of the cheerfulness that seemed to come from a never ending fountain was transmitted in the countless letters Elsie wrote to other sufferers; from the depths of her own struggle, she was able to draw a measure of comfort and hope to help others along the rough road of her life. Her favorite hobbies were reading and listing to the radio; before the war she derived great pleasure from the amateur stations, and many of the local “fans” always had a special word for her whenever they came on the air.

Funeral services held on Wednesday, June 11th, were taken jointly by the Victoria Pastor, Rev. Mr. Heywood, and Rev. S.I. Murley, B.A., a former Pastor, at that time President of the Newfoundland Conference of the United Church. The hearse bearing the remains was followed by a hearse laden with floral tributes, donated by relatives and friends far and near. The hymns sung were Elsie’s favorites and had been selected by herself. Miss Beatrice Hawker from Carbonear, presided at the organ in the home, and Mr. Tuck, Principal of Victoria School, played at the Church. The funeral was largely attended, the Sunday School paying their last respect to a former Secretary, by walking in a body.

Left to mourn their sad loss, beside her father and mother, are one sister, Annie, two brothers, Albert and John at home; and a very large circle of relatives and friends. Expressions of sympathy have been received by the family, from a large number of people, at home and abroad; in Conception Bay particularly, where Elsie’s fight for life was widely known. The untimely end of a gallant girl is sincerely regretted. The community at large will join with the near friends in offering condolence to the bereaved parents.

July 17 1941 WEDDINGS CORMIER — PEDDLE: The marriage of Miss Margaret Cormier, daughter of Mr and Mrs Joseph P. Cormier, West Corner Brook, to Bernard Peddle, East Valley Road, took place at Holy Redeemer Church, Corner Brook, on July 9th. The ceremony was performed by Rev. Joseph Peddle of the Cathedral Parish, Harbor Grace, brother of the bridegroom, who also celebrated the Nuptial Mass. — Humber Hearld.

DELANEY — MORIARITY: The marriage of Miss Nellie Delaney, daughter of Mrs. and the late Mr. Delaney, Botwood Road, and Mrs. John Moriarity of Harbor Grace, took place at the R.C. Church Grand Falls, on Sunday July 6th. Rev. Father Moriarity, brother of the groom, performed the ceremony, having come from Scarboro Bluffs, Ontario, for the occasion. Father Moriarity is not back long from China, to which mission he is attached. — Grand Falls Advertiser

July 17 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE The express train going out this evening will be in two sections. First and second class passengers for points to Port aux basques will leave at six o’clock and all sleeping car passengers at 6.20. Passengers for the St. John’s Hunbermouth service will be leaving St. John’s at five o’clock this afternoon.

Mr. P.A. Edwards of Grand Falls, received a cablegram from his son who is serving in the Royal Air Force. The cable stated that Charlie is well and happy and sends regards to all. Although war time regulations prohibited the disclosure of the name of place from which the cable was sent, Mr. Edwards states he has reason to feel that Charlie is stationed in Alexandria. — Grand Falls Advertiser.

The annual doll show under the auspices of the Playground Association at Grand Falls, will be held tomorrow and on Saturday, a picnic will lake place.

The work of laying a concrete sidewalk on the East side of Waldegrave Street, has been completed from Water to George Streets, and the balance of the section has been excavated ready for the concrete.

The annual installation ceremony of Lodge McKay, 1129, Bay Roberts, took place in the Lodge Rooms at Bay Roberts last night. Representatives of the District Grand Lodge and Sister Lodges were in attendance.

The ladies auxiliary of the T.A. and B. Society held their annual outing yesterday. They left in the forenoon for Avondale and returned again last night. They had a most enjoyable time.

The total proceeds of the sale of “Forget-me-nots” in Bay Roberts, Coleys Point, and Shearstown this year, amounted to $35.70. Considering that the population of this area is about 4,000, the response to the appeal was very small. — Bay Roberts Guardian


July 18 1941 WEDDING BELLS HYNES — CROSS: A quiet wedding took place at the Manse of St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church yesterday at noon, when Gerald, son of Mrs. And the late W.H. Hynes was united in marriage with Mary Louise, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Cross. The ceremony was performed by Rev. A.T. Barr, D.D., Minister of the Church.

The bride wore a rose beige redingote with white accessories, and was attended as Matron of Honor by Mrs. Herbert Cross, who wore a frock of marona blue crepe with navy blue accessories. The best man was Mr. Herbert Cross.

After the ceremony a reception was held at “Popinn” Topsail, when the usual toasts were duly honored. The bride and groom are spending their honeymoon on the Peninsula of Avalon.

July 18 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE The following streets were repaired with gravel during the past week, St. Claire’s Ave, Waterford Bridge Road, Carpasian Road, Gower Street , Linscott Street. During the past week Council employees laid 240 feet, six inch cast iron pipe in Freshwater Road. During the past week, 100 feet of six inch earthenware pipe were laid in Empire Avenue by Council employees. Excavation is in progress for the sewer extension in Waterford Bridge Road.

Some of the Boy Scouts Troops are now in camp and others will be going in next week at various places.

The band concert held in Bannerman Park last night by Mount Cashel Band, was attended by a large number of people. A very choice selection of music was rendered.

An out of town bus driver was before Court yesterday, charged with carrying more passengers than his permit allowed. Sergeant Fred Churchill stated he stopped the accused at Chamberlains, and counted fifty people in the bus. There was no notice posted in the bus stating the number of passengers that can be carried by law. The driver said he knew nothing about this regulation. He was fined $1.00.

A lady Shopkeeper of Gorman’s Lane was before Court yesterday charged with failing to declare all the liquor in her possession, and having possession of bottles on which there were defaced labels. The defendant is on the black list, and Police searching her premises, found three flasks of liquor in a cupboard. She was fined $50.00


July 19 1941 MARRIAGES MULCAHY — WALSH: At Corpus Christi Church, Kilbride, on July 15th, by the Rt. Rev.. Mons. Rawlins, Margaret A. Walsh, to Ernest J. Mulcahy.
July 19 1941 BIRTHS QUAST — Born at the French Hospital, New York City, a daughter to Mr. and Mrs. A. Walter Quast, (nee Genevieve Murphy)
July 19 1941 DEATHS BENSON — Passed peacefully away yesterday afternoon, Eleazer (Sandy) Benson, Master Carpenter, aged 43 years, leaving to mourn, wife and eight children, mother and two sisters. Funeral on Sunday at 2.30 p.m. from his late residence, 146 Campbell Avenue.
July 19 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE A resident of New Gower Street was before Court yesterday, charged with forging four cheques, to the total amount of $100.00 on the Royal Bank of Canada, and presenting them for payment. He pleaded guilty. The evidence was that the man drew on his wife’s savings account without her knowledge, on four occasions during the month of May. The solicitor for his wife said the bank had made good the money. He appeared before Magistrate O’Neill yesterday afternoon, and was ordered to make good the amount to the bank. Sentence was suspended in view of the man’s record in the Mercantile Marine, which has been a remarkable one.

The train leaving at 8.30 on Monday morning will make connection at Argentia for the Bay route of Placentia Bay.

Employees of the Sanitary Department, last week collected 545 loads of ashes and garbage, whilst 156 gullies were dipped and carted, and 53 gullies were cleaned. There were sixty-two men working with 22 horses.


July 21 1941 WAR VETERAN LAID TO REST Funeral Obsequies Yesterday of The Late Eleazor Benson

The funeral of the late Eleazor Benson (Sandy) Benson, took place yesterday afternoon from his late residence, 146 Campbell Avenue, and was attended by a very large number of mourners, and was a sincere tribute to the esteem in which he was held in St. John’s.

Deceased who had reached middle age, went overseas with the original “C” Company, and was No. 688 in the Royal Navy, a veteran of Gallipoli and one of “Ours” wounded in France. He had been suffering for some time from his war disabilities, and underwent serious operations last year at the Grace Hospital, where he was a patient for quite a long period, under the care of Dr. W. Roberts, to whom with the Nurses, he always accorded high praise.

He had been most successful in latter years as a Master Carter, and gave great satisfaction to the business firms with which he was associated; all though his illness he received much sympathy from his numerous friends, relatives and family, by whom her is survived, including his wife (nee Miss Horwood) eight children, mother and two sisters.

Outside the Campbell Avenue residence yesterday, the S.A. band played feelingly, two favorite hymns of the deceased; then the cortege formed up, with a detachment of the G.W.V.A. wearing poppies, following the band, under Sergt. Geo. Gulliver, two hearses, one being filled with beautiful floral tributes and the other bearing the casket, which was covered with the Union Jack, and had many wreaths; there was a guard of honor from the Truckmens’ Protective Union; Dominion Vice-President, W.R. Dawe, and Secretary W.R. Martin, representing the G.W.V.A., with a long procession of citizens, concluding with S.A. representatives and numerous motor cars. Mr. Wm. Lawrence was undertaker.

At the S.A. cemetery, the service was taken by Major Abbott; the scriptural lesson was read by Major W. Cornick, and the final prayer by Major J. Hewitt. The Silver Bands of the three Citadels accompanied the hymns, which were most impressive.

Capt. C. Murphy recited the War Veterans Ritual at the graveside, and the Ex-servicemen filed past solemnly, dropping the poppies of remembrance; and thus in the beautiful sunshine of a delightful July Sabbath, was another soldier laid to rest.

A Memorial Service for the late Mr. Benson was held at No. 1 Citadel, S.A., last night, and there was a large congregation present.

July 21 1941 WEDDING BELLS MITCHELL — SOMERTON: A very pretty wedding was solemnized at St. Lawrence Church, Portugal Cove, on July 7th when Gordon, son of Mr. and Mrs Robert Mitchell was united in marriage with Elizabeth, daughter of Mr and Mrs. George Somerton, by Rev. A.T. Tulk.

The bride was charmingly attired in a floor length gown of white silk tulle with inserts of lace. The bridal veil of halo style was held in place with orange blossoms. She wore silver slippers and carried a bouquet of carnations, summer chrysanthumes and maiden hair fern. The bride was attended by her Aunt, Miss Lottie Somerton, R.N., and was attired in rose slipper satin, with white accessories, and wore a corsage of carnation and fern.

The groom being a member of H.M.S. Royal Navy was supported by James Hammond, also of the Royal Navy. The bride was given in marriage by her father.

The bride, attended by her Aunt, entered the Church to the strains of the wedding march, ably rendered by her cousin, Mable Somerton, who was dressed in shell pink georgette with black accessories. After the ceremony the reception was held at home of the bride’s grand parents, Mr. and Mrs. R.J. Somerton. The following week the groom returned to rejoin his ship. The friends of Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Mitchell wish them both every success and happiness. — Guest.

July 21 1941 PULPWOOD IS STILL SCATTERED The 1700 cords of pulpwood, which were being towed in a boom from West Bay to Corner Brook on July 3rd, when overtaken by a severe storm of wind 10 o’clock that night, whilst rounding South Head, Bay of Islands, where the boom parted, releasing its contents, still remain to a great extent scattered along the shore. A few hundred cords has been salvaged by the tugs before the wind changed to off shore, taking the wood out the bay again.

The fourth and last tow of logs to come forward this season, will be ready to leave West Bay this week. Though the summer season of 1941 has been a most unusual one as regards weather conditions, it is not likely such another gale of West wind as that of July 3rd, will be experienced soon again.

The two previous booms had reached here safely, covering the 60 miles in about 70 hours. — Western Star.

July 21 1941 DEATHS GORMAN — Passed peacefully away at 12.30 p.m. Saturday, July 19th, Mary Bridget Gorman, in her 22nd year. Funeral today Monday, at 2.30 p.m., from her late residence, Kilbride.

GAMBERG — Passed peacefully away at St. Claire’s Mercy Hospital on Saturday, July 19th Mary, widow of the late George Gamberg, leaving to mourn, two daughters and three sons. Funeral at 2.45 today, Monday from her late residence, 11 Flavin Street.

July 21 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE The Catalina Correspondent of the Fishermen’s Advocate, states that for the first time in years, caplin have come in the lower section of the harbor. Last week, the caplin were in the beach by Hiscock’s stage, and a quantity were secured by two women with castnets.

A Sergeant from the American Army was before Court on Saturday, and was charged with sending in a false fire alarm, on Friday night. A representative of the Army was in attendance, and asked that the hearing be postponed till Saturday next. Magistrate O’Neill granted the request.

Capt. Garland Rowe recently purchased the aux schooner “A L. Roy,” from Pellys at Monroe, and is now engaged in the coastal trade. Mr. Rowe sold the aux “James Spurrell” to McCormack and Walsh, early this year, and she is now at the Labrador fishery. — Fishermen’s Advocate.

The annual Garden Party at Conception Harbor will be held on August 3rd.

Passengers for the Labrador service as far as Hopedale, including Northwest River, will be leaving St. John’s on Wednesday morning at ten o’clock.

July 21 1941 ODDITIES London - Many Hotel Proprietors in the Thames Valley, accommodate their overflow of guests in house-boats.

Nottingham, England — Investigation of an unusual run on traveling rugs revealed that women were buying them, presumably for babies’ coverlets, and re-modeling them for winter coats, thus avoiding rationing.


July 22 1941 WEDDING BELLS MILLEY — MACPHERSON: A very pretty wedding was solemnized at Cochrane Street Centennial Church on Monday, July 21st when Robert Milley was united in marriage to Miss Rene Macpherson, both of Grand Falls. The officiating Clergyman was Rev. Edward Milley, B.A., of Breadalbane, P.E.I., twin brother of the bridegroom. The bride was supported by Mrs. Milley while Lance Corporal Alex S. Burt, R.C.E., acted as best man

Following the ceremony at the Church a short reception was held at the home of Mr. H.N. Burt, 79 Hayward Avenue, following which the happy couple started a motor tour of the Avalon Peninsula, and from thence they will proceed to Curling for the balance of their honeymoon, and then will return to Grand Falls, where they will in future reside.

Miss Macpherson was a member of the office staff of the A.N.D. Co., and last week a party and shower was tendered in her honor by the Boy Scouts Association, she being a leader of the Cubs. Upwards of three hundred attended the function. Mr. Milley is a member of the staff of the Grand Falls branch of the Bank of Montreal.

July 22 1941 OBITUARY PATRICK BYRNE: RIVERHEAD, Hr. Grace, July 16 — On Thursday, June 19th, there passed to, “That bourne whence no traveler returns”, a highly respected citizen of Riverhead, Harbor Grace, in the person of Patrick Byrne, at the age of thirty-eight years. Almost since his return from the United States about four years ago, the deceased had been confined to his home on account of failing health, but until a short time previous to his death, hopes for his recovery were always entertained by his friends.

Everything that Physicians, nurses, and friends could accomplish, was done to arrest the dreaded disease, but to no avail, and so being thoroughly resigned, he welcomed God’s Holy Will, and joined in the prayer for the dying with great unction, until quietly and without any apparent effort, he passed to his eternal reward. Those who were with him during his last days of suffering were edified at the perfect resignation that was his, his spirit of prayer and his implicit confidence in God. During his illness, he had the regular ministrations of the Priests of his Church — The Rev. J. Peddle, and the Rev. F. Terry visiting him frequently.

Patrick possessed a keen wit, and this coupled with a genial, kindly disposition, won for him countless friends during life, both at Riverhead and at Boston, where he has spent nine years before returning home.

His funeral which was largely attended was held from his late residence to St. Joseph’s Church on Saturday, the burial prayers being read by Rev. Father Peddle. Many spiritual offerings were given as well as many floral tributes, to indicate the high esteem in which he was held by all who knew him.

Surviving relatives are his wife, nee Gertie Reynolds, one daughter, Alice; his aged father, John W. Byrne; and one brother, Edward; to all of whom the writer extends sincere sympathy. May his soul rent in peace. A FRIEND

July 22 1941 MARRIAGE TUCKER — REES: Miss Ethel Tucker, daughter of Mrs. and the late Peter Tucker of Broad Cove, was married to Louis, son of Mrs. and the late E.H. Rees of Bell Island, recently. The ceremony was performed at the C. of E. Church by Rev. N.S. Noel.
July 22 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE All grades of barreled meats show increases of from one to two dollars. Sugar is up 10 cents per sack, while feeds, despite the removal of duty, show upward advance. Dried apples are up to 2c a pound, and all canned fruits, vegetables, and pickles, are showing advance. — Nfld Trade Review.

Laborers working for Goodyear and Sons at Grand Falls, demanded a wage increase last Wednesday morning, and refused to work further until same was forthcoming. The matter was discussed between employers and employed, and a settlement was reached - the men’s demands were granted — Grand Fall Advertiser.

The Grand Falls Advertiser states that Petty Officer Harry C. Flanagan of H.M.S. Berwick when she visited Newfoundland in 1938, was married to Miss Jane Austin of Ardthie Road, Drumoyne, recently. The marriage was performed at St. Gabriel’s Church, Covan, by Rev. J. McBride. Petty Officer Birdwell of the same ship was best man.

Several cases for breach of the Highway Traffic Act were heard before Magistrate O’Neill yesterday and fines were imposed.

A Highroad truck which was heavily loaded with lumber was badly damaged on the Hall’s Bay Road last Tuesday. One man was injured and was conveyed to the Lady Northcliff Hospital at Grand Falls. — Grand Falls Advertiser.


July 24 1941 WEDDING BELLS DOWNEY — MAHONEY: A very pretty wedding was solemnized at St. Patrick’s Church on the 12th July, by Rev. Father J.D. Savin, when Miss Mary Mahoney, daughter of the late Mr. Michael Mahoney and Mrs. Mahoney, was united in the bonds of Holy Matrimony to William Downey, son of Mr. and Mrs. P.J. Downey of Hamilton Street. The father giver was Mr. Joe Mahoney, uncle of the bride, and the bridesmaid was Mrs. A Walsh, sister of the groom. The best man was Mr. A.J. Harris.

The bride who looked very charming, was attired in a powder blue crepe dress with accessories to match, and carried a bouquet of carnations. The bridesmaid’s dress was of dusty rose and was very pretty.

Following the ceremony at the Church, a short drive was taken around Bowring Park, after which the wedding party repaired to the residence of the bridegroom’s parents on Hamilton Street, where the wedding reception was held. The toast to the bride and groom was proposed by Mr. P.E. Outerbridge, who took as his theme, “Happy is the bride whom the sun shines on!” and was ably responded to by the groom. A beautiful three tier wedding cake was enjoyed by all. Following the reception, the bridal couple drove to Topsail to spend a short honeymoon.

All their many friends wish Mr. and Mrs. Downey a very happy married life.

July 24 1941 BIRTHS GROUCHY — At the Grace Hospital on Wednesday, July 23rd, to Kay, wife of Frank Grouchy, a daughter.
July 24 1941 DEATHS GOADBY — Passed peacefully away on July 24th Mary, aged 69 years, widow of the late Frederick Goadby; leaving one son in St. John’s and one daughter in U.S.A. Funeral by motor hearse from her late residence 118 Water Street West. R. I. P
July 24 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE The weather for the holiday yesterday, was perfect and a large number went out of town for the half holiday. Cars and taxis lined the roads and buses were extremely busy especially going to Topsail, Manuels.

Caterpillars are numerous in Bay Roberts and other towns in Conception Bay again this year, and are doing considerable damage to trees, etc. They not only remain on trees, but are also to be found on the ground, on fences, and on houses. — Bay Roberts Guardian.

Miss Jean Budgell was the guest of honor at a party given last week by her co-workers at E.V. Valley Royal Stores Ltd., Grand Falls. It was the nature of a surprise, and was in honor of Miss Budgell’s approaching marriage to Mr. Jim Adams, which is to take place shortly.

The young lady employees of the Grand Falls Co-Operative Society, tendered a shower to their co-worker Miss Blanch Snow, last week. It was in honor of her approaching marriage to Mr. Gus Bishop, who is an employee of the Co-Operative Society Ltd.

Some kind of dust allayer has been spread on the Carpasian Road leading to Camp Alexander, and it has effected a great improvement. It is hoped by residents, that the road leading to the swimming pool and up Fraser’s Lane and across Empire Avenue, will be similarly treated.

July 24 1941 ODDITIES Many members of the British House of Parliament are now serving in the Army.

A village, a river, and a railroad are spanned by one bridge at Crutchfield, N.C.

A “parsec” is a unit of length used in expressing distance of the stars.

During the California gold rush, roast grizzly bear sold for $1 a slice in that state.

Canada produced 6,595,846 pairs of shoes during the first quarter of 1940.

The lens of a camera is named for its resemblance to a lentil seed.


July 25 1941 WEDDING BELLS POWER — KEATING: A very pretty wedding was solemnized at the Church of the Holy Rosary, Portugal Cove, on Sunday, July 6th, when Anthony Power was united in the holy bond of matrimony to Miss Mary Frances Keating, the officiating Clergyman was the Revered P.P. Sheehan, P.P., a lifelong friend of the happy couple .

The bride looked charming in a dress of corn-flower blue chantilly lace, with hat and shoes to match. She carried a bouquet of pink and white carnations and maiden hair fern. The bride was attended by Miss Annie English who wore navy blue with orchid accessories, whilst the duties of best man were performed by Mr. J J Caul. Following the ceremony, a reception was held at Woodstock and toasts were honored, after which the happy couple left by train for Badger, where the honeymoon is being spent. The bride’s going away costume was a fawn ensemble with brown accessories.

Mr. Power is well known for his efforts on behalf of the mining industry of this country, and the many friends of the happy couple wish them happiness and prosperity in the years to come.

July 25 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE At Freshwater Road, Council employees have laid 420 feet of cast iron. 6 inch pipe, to date.

During the past few days some mackerel have been secured in Fortune Bay, but no large quantities have been taken as yet.

A messenger boy was before Court yesterday charged with operating a bicycle with another youth riding on the handle bars. He was fined fifty cents.

The Codroy Correspondent of the Western Star, stated that the great shortages of domestic help in the Codroy Valley necessitated the calling of a number of girls from points on the South Coast, to help lift burden off hard working farm women and ill mothers. From homes where these girls are employed there is nothing but the highest praise for these industrious assistants.


July 26 1941 OBITUARY JOSEPH SMITH SR.: TILTON, July 16 — We are reminded daily, aye hourly, that Death comes unexpectedly, and the fact was exemplified in the case of Joseph Smith, Sr., of Tilton, C.B., who passed away at the Newfoundland Airport on June 24th 1941.

The sudden passing of Joe, as he was familiarly known to his family and friends, came as a great shock to all, as he was a very robust and active man at the age of 47 years, and worked without any complaint, to the eve of June 24th, then had to answer the unavoidable call of the grim reaper. Thus it is very sadly true when we say his death gave all, both family and friends, a terrible shock. With him at the time of his sudden and unexpected death was his gallant son Jacob, who went overseas to serve in H.M. Navy, but has since, owing to some disability which had developed while on service, been honorably discharged.

The remains were sent out by express and were buried on Friday, June 27th. The members of “Chosen Few” L.O.L., of which Lodge the deceased was a prominent member, turned out in regalia to pay their last respects to their deceased brother. The service was conducted by the Rev. E. Hunt, C. of E. Rector of this place, who spoke very feelingly to the bereaved family; also on the sterling qualities of the deceased, as a Chairman and a citizen of his community.

Left to mourn their sad loss are a wife, three sons; Jacob, Joseph, and Fred; also four daughters; Susie, Nellie, Winnie, and Eileen, also one brother; Moses Smith; all of whom reside at Tilton. To the bereaved family the writer extends sympathy. And thus has passed on a kind father, a faithful husband, and a respected citizen. — R I.P. H.C.

July 26 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE The train leaving at 8.30 Monday morning will make connection at Argentia for the Western route of Placentia Bay.

According to the Twillingate, Sun Captain Andrew Greenham is reported to be at Croc on the French Shore and has 500 barrels codfish put down.

The Church lads Brigade will return from camp today and cars will go out in the afternoon for the purpose of taking them back to town.

A motorist was before Court yesterday charged with operating a car without having obtained a driver’s licence. The man claimed it was a case of mistaken identity. The hearing was postponed.

A twenty-eight-year-old man was before Magistrate O’Neill yesterday and was charged with stealing a motor car, the property of James Taylor. The hearing was postponed until the 30th July.

The “Overland Limited” tomorrow, will make connection at Humbermouth for the St. John’s-Humbermouth service.

Codfish were plentiful on the local grounds yesterday, and large quantities sold in the local markets had many buyers.

The “Overland Limited” tomorrow, Sunday, will make connection at Lewisporte for the Green Bay service.

The Twillingate Sun states that the cod fishery has been fairly good with traps. Anstey’s traps at Back Harbor, and Roberts’ at Long Point, were leaders last week, with some of the traps making 50 barrel hauls. 


July 29 1941 DEATHS BURKE — Passed peacefully away at 1.30 this morning, William P. Burke, aged 60 years, leaving to mourn their sad loss; three sons, one with the 57th Regiment Newfoundland Royal Artillery, and one in the Mercantile Marine, one daughter, and one adopted daughter, and one brother. Funeral on Wednesday at 2.30 p.m. from his late residence 76 Patrick Street. (English and American papers please copy.)
July 29 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE The annual Requiem Mass at Belvedere Cemetery will be held on Tuesday August 5th, weather permitting.

During the past week, the roof was replaced on the R.C. Parish Hall and Gaiety Theatre, near Town Square. — The Bell Islander.

A man before Court yesterday, charged with being drunk and disorderly, and assaulting the Proprietor of the Belmont Tavern, was fined $2.00 and put under bond in the sum of $200.00.

Further increases are shown in the price of barreled beef, while ham and bacon are up three cents. Sugar shows a further slight advance as do oats. Onions have declined 25 cents. — Nfld Trade Review.

The driver of a car failed to stop before entering a through street, and was fined $1.00. Another for a similar offence was fined $2.00.

The tag day and dance held at Grand Falls last week, under the auspices of the Grand Falls and Windsor Cigarette Club, to provide smokes for the boys overseas, proved a great success. The amount netted will exceed expectations.

A reception in honor of Seaman Samson Everett Allan and Leo Ezekiel was held at St. Peter’s Hall on Bell Island last night.

A bus driver from Avondale was before Court yesterday, charged with carrying more passengers than permitted by law. He was fined $3.00.

The Miners employed on the West side of No. 3 Mine could not work on Wednesday, the last day of working period, due to the derailment of the locomotive on 900 West Level on Tuesday afternoon. — The Bell Islander.

Evidence of the improving industrial situation on the surface, was shown at the beginning of the week, when all the haulage worked until 9 o’clock on Monday evening. They worked until 9.30 Tuesday evening, and this continued during the week. This extra work times means that the surface shovels are also operating more hours, and that more ore is being taken from the stockpile. – The Bell Islander.

A young man was before Magistrate O’Neill yesterday afternoon, charged with stealing a coat from some person unknown, and with stealing a windbreaker from the London New York and Paris Association of Fashion Ltd. He pleaded not guilty to both and he stated he had purchased them. In the first instance he was sentenced to 3 months imprisonment. Judge O’Neill, on the second charge was reserved. He has a long Court record.

The annual Doll show under the auspices of the Playground Association, was held at Grand Falls last week, and proved to be the most successful yet held in Grand Falls. One hundred and fifteen children lined up their dolls when the show began. There were no less than ten different classes of dolls, and three prizes were awarded in each class. The judges were Mesdames Scott, Hillier, Morrow, Manuel, Duggan, and Hollett, and their task was not a easy one. Grand Falls Advertiser.


July 30 1941 WEDDING BELLS WALBOURNE — PEACH: A very pretty wedding was solemnized at St. Peter’s Church of England Church, at Kingwell, P.B., on Wednesday July 3rd., when Mr. George Walbourne of Fogo, was united in marriage to Miss Effie Florence Peach of Arnold’s Cove. The officiating Clergyman was Rev. John Watkins of Harbor Buffett, P.B.

The bride looked charming in pale blue bridal veil, entwined with roses round her brow, and carrying a bouquet of Rocketts. She was ably supported by her sister, Mrs. Eugine Guy, while Mr. George Guy acted as best man. Mr. Alexander Adams gave away the bride, in the absence of her father, Mr. Nelson Hynes and Miss Elsie Rodway, Mr and Mrs. Wm. J. Coveyduck, acted as bride’s boys and girls.

Following the ceremony the Bridal Party proceeded by boat to Arnold’s Cove, were a reception was held at the home of the bride’s parents.

The happy couple, are leaving for St. John’s to spend part of their honeymoon with their sisters, thence proceeding to Fogo, to conclude their honeymoon with the groom’s parents and relatives.

The groom is a Teacher and they will then go to White Bay, where he will take up his duties.

FOWLOW — BISHOP: The Cathedral of St. John’ the Baptist at St. John’s, was the scene of a very pretty wedding on Thursday morning, July 24th when Muriel, youngest daughter of Henry J.W. and the late Catherine Bishop of Petty Hr., was united in holy bonds of Matrimony to Rev. Guy Fowlow, eldest son of Capt. Kenneth and Henrietta Fowlow of Trinity East.

His Lordship, Bishop White, assisted by Rev. Canon Higham, performed the marriage ceremony, following which Rev. Jacob Brinton celebrated the Holy Communion. The impressive and beautiful service was witnessed by many relatives and friends of the contracting parties.

The bride, charmingly attired in a gown of white lace over taffetta with bridal veil, and carrying a bouquet of pink and white gladiola and carnations with maiden hair fern, was given in marriage by her father. The bridesmaids were Miss Alice Bishop, sister of the bride, and Miss Dorothy Bishop, niece of the bride, who wore gowns of pink and blue chiffon respectively, with matching floral cornets, and carried shower bouquets of pink and white sweet peas with fern. The duties of best man were ably performed by Mr. John A. Thorne, cousin of the groom. The ushers were Messrs J. G. Howell and Eric Bishop.

Following the ceremony, a reception with wedding breakfast has held at “Woodstock,” Topsail, where the usual toasts were honored, after which the happy couple left on a tour of the Avalon Peninsula. Upon their return they will take up residence at Burgeo, where the groom is Rector.

The bride’s going away costume consisted of a rose ensemble with blue and rose hat, and accessories to match.

The writer bespeaks for a large circle of friends, very good wishes for the future happiness of the newly-weds. — J.A.T.

July 30 1941 INWARD PASSENGERS The following passengers arrived from the Fogo Service yesterday afternoon: Miss D. Pope, Miss D. Piercey, Miss C. Philpot, Miss E. Earle, Miss I. Chaffey, Miss K. Hiscock, Mrs. B. Johnston, Miss E. Johnston, Mrs. G. Johnston, Miss. O. Cuff, Adjt., E. Stanley, S.A.; Miss. M. Murphy; Miss K Whalen; Miss A Stone; Mrs S.I. Murley, Miss K Whalen, Miss J Gullage, Miss R. Fraser, Mrs. A Christian and son, Miss C. White, Miss Winsor, Miss N. Winsor, Miss J. Spurrell, L.F. Lodge, G. Lodge, Rev. Dr. Fitzgerald, Rev. H.G. Spurrell, M.J. Kean, H.J. Pope, F. Morris, H. Groves, J. Harris, R. Record.
July 30 1941 ENGAGEMENT Mr and Mrs. J.B. Gilliatt of Wabana, announce the engagement of their eldest daughter, Jean Ruggles, to Lieut. Arthur Holdsworth Peake, youngest son of Lt. Col. and Mrs, Arthur George Peake of Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island. The marriage will take place shortly at Brockville, Ontario.
July 30 1941 DEATHS MARTIN — Passed peacefully away at St. Claire’s Mercy Hospital, after short illness, Bride, (Earles) beloved wife of William J. Martin; leaving to mourn husband, one son, one daughter, one brother, (Joseph) one sister, (Mrs. A. Farrell) and a large circle of friends. Funeral at 2.30 p.m. Thursday July 31st., from her late residence 36 Fleming Street. May the Sacred Heart of Jesus have mercy on her soul.
July 30 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE Council employees are now engaged in laying concrete sidewalk on Pleasant St.

The time for allowance of discount on City Taxes for the current half year, will expire on tomorrow July 13th.

The grounds of Government House will be opened to the public on Sunday, August 3rd 3 to 5 p.m.

The Avalon Telephone Co., are now laying an underground cable from their office through various streets. The work is progressing favorably.

A set of books on Police Procedure and Administration, presented to the Police Library by Mr. A.R. Spracklin of the Canadian Life Assurance Co., is deeply appreciated by the Chief of Police, and all members of the Constabulary.

People who returned from the South West Coast yesterday, stated that weather conditions there for the past few days, were most unfavorable. There was much fog and it was quite cold.

All men who have filled in registration forms, signifying their intention of enlisting in the Auxiliary Fire Service, and any others interested, are asked to meet at the Central Fire Hall on Friday evening at eight o’clock.

July 30 1941 ODDITIES Fountain of Punch — in 1649, the English Admiral, Russell, Earl of Oxford, prepared a toast to the King, by filling a fountain with punch.

Motorboats — There are more that 3,000,000 registered motorboats in the United States, and it is estimated there may be 200,000 unregistered boats, and 200,000 outboard motors in use.

Cows in Zones — Farm animals have been placed in zoos in large cities, as city bred children find them to be as much a curiosity, as the animals of far-off-lands.

Scientific Opinion — Scientists say the red appearance of the Planet Mars, may be granite rocks or red clay, giving back the ruddy reflection in the sun’s light.

Odd Steamer — A small steamer, plying between East and West Russia, travels by canal until it comes to a hill, and then climbs over the hill by rail; five hills thus traversed during the journey.

Friday Big Day — Columbus set sail on Friday; left the Canary Islands on Friday; first sighted land on Friday, and began his return journey on Friday.

Did You Know — Passengers can be ordered to take turns at look-out duty, by Captains of British Liners.


July 31 1941 OBITUARY MARION BASSITT: “Just as the morning of new life was breaking into day, her young and youthful spirit passed from earth and toil away.”

At 2.15 p.m. yesterday, Marion, daughter of Mr and Mrs. Jas. Bassett, (Barber) passed away after a long and tedious illness. Educated at Presentation Convent, she was a favorite amongst her classmates. Leaving to mourn her sad loss are; mother, father, 4 sisters and 1 brother. Funeral will take place from her late residence, 11 McDougall Street at 2.30 p.m. on Friday.

July 31 1941 WEDDING BELLS O’KEEFR—KENNY: Those who were interested in the O’Keefe–Kenny nuptial’s, must have watched the early morning of yesterday, as in the lovely dawn, they heard the soft, majestic tread of the latter days of July. And as those waiting in the beautiful Oratory of the Convent of Mercy, witnessed the gathering of the immediate friends for the Nuptial Mass, the gray clouds lifted their somber lids; the sun came through the stained glass windows, and the rays were apparently directed on the happy couple, soon to be united in the Holy Bonds of matrimony, who stood before the Altar in the presence of Rev. R. McD. Murphy.

Candles lent their dim but hallowed light to the scene, and as the ceremony progressed, those privileged to attend, took in the picture. The bride, Catherine Mary, daughter of the late Walter and Mrs. Margaret Kenny; the groom, James L. O’Keefe, son of Mr and Mrs. William O’Keefe of Long’s Hill. The father giver was Dr. J.J. Kennedy, (a nephew of the late Mr Kenny). Mr. Patrick Kenny, brother of the bride, was best man.

The bride looked very happy and attractive in her wedding dress of white silk organdie. She wore a lace veil, with orange blossoms helping to form the Coronet. Her bridal bouquet was of pink carnations and maiden hair fern. She was attended by Miss Winnie O’Keefe, sister of the groom, and her own sister, Miss Mary Kenny, as bridesmaids. The former wore pink satin, and the latter, pale blue satin, with Juliet caps and silver shauls to match.

Mrs. Walter Kenny, the bride’s mother, wore a costume of navy blue with orchid accessories. Only the immediate relatives of the contracting parties were present, and it was regrettable that the parents of the groom were unavoidably absent on account of illness.

Following the ceremony, the bridal party motored to Smithville where the wedding breakfast was served. This fine old place seems to have lost none of its charm. The weather was kindly, and all the beauty of late July, all the attractions of this fair month, seemed to have magnified in the brilliance of it maturity.

The usual toasts were honored, Chief of Police P.J O’Neill, O.B.E., proposed the health of the bride and groom in a most felicitous speech, to which Mr O’Keefe responded in good form. Mr. Chas Kelly, H.M.C., added his felicitations, after Mr. P. Kenny, the best man, had paid the customary tribute. Music and versatile conversation followed, to which all contributed, and in the delightful surroundings, those present saw the happiness of “carrying on” through the shadowed roadways of the years, and leading their lives to its long, its sweet appeal .

At mid-day, the arrangements were made for the honeymoon trip, and at the residence of 51 Monkstown Road, farewells were said. The bride’s going away dress was a pale blue costume, with white hat, white fox fur and accessories. It was a very happy, a very pleasant, a delightful wedding.

In the late afternoon, one had an opportunity to look over some of the presents. The excitement of the late morning and noon has subsided. Silver and Chinaware, porcelain and fine linens, gleamed in the fading light. The greeting cards were expressive and sincere. One read, rather beautifully, and wistfully, “Happy People, A Home of Heart’s Content; where bright dreams last, as years slip past”. The memories of the wedding party still lingered; and a hush was over the living room, as in expectancy of the happiness which the O’Keefe–Kenny wedding should bring to this city of ours. L.C.M. 

July 31 1941 DEATHS BASSETT — Passed peacefully away at 2.15 p.m. on July 30th, Marion, aged 17 years; beloved daughter of James and Anna Bassett, leaving to mourn; father, mother, four sisters, and 1 brother. Funeral on Friday at 2.30 p.m. from her late residence, 11 McDougall St. R. I. P.
July 31 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE Some of the garden parties and other outdoor events which were to have been held yesterday afternoon, were postponed because of the doubtful weather conditions. Decisions to postpone was made in the forenoon, though they might have gone on, as there was no rain till late in the evening, and then not much

Hay cutting has begun in several sections. The crop has been very good, though in some places is not as good as it was last year.

A reception was held at the Public Building in Bay Roberts last week, in honor of Donald Hambling of the R.C.A.F., who was home on leave, after completing his training in Canada, and Frank Tipple, who just returned from England after serving for eighteen months in the Nfld Overseas Forestry Unit. Capt. John Parsons, President of the N P A, presided. Speeches were delivered and presentations were made by Miss R.F. Parsons, President of the W.P.A. — Bay Roberts Guarding.

The express train leaving tonight will be in two sections, First and second class passengers will leave at 6 p.m. and sleeping car passengers at 6.30.

Visitors to the Garden Party at Government House on August 1st are asked to enter by the West Gate on Military Road, and leave by the East Gate on King’s Bridge Road. Arrangement for parking in the grounds, have been made.

The weather for the holiday yesterday, was very doubtful, and it was on the cool side, and consequently, many who had planned spending the afternoon in the country were afraid to take the chance. Those who went did not have things as pleasant as they hoped.

Mr. Ernest Paddock of Winsor, returned from England last week. Mr. Paddock had conducted a draft of Naval Volunteers to Britain last winter, and reported that all of the men arrived safely and in good health. He stated that all of the people of Britain are firm in their morale, and that everybody is putting forth the greatest effort to win the war. — Grand Falls Advertiser.

Last week, seven navy boys returned home to Bell Island on Leave. They were; Seamen Leo Ezekiel, Everett Allan, Cyril Hann, Richard Clarke, Albert C. Bugdell, Fred O’Brien, Ronald Field. All went overseas with the first Naval Draft in November 1939. Before these boys leave the Island, they are to be presented with a fountain pen and 100 cigarettes each, by the N.P.A. This was not done in the case of the first and second Naval Drafts as the Patriotic association had not then been organized. — The Bell Islander. 


August 1 1941 WEDDING BELLS RUMBOLDT — MORRISSEY: A very pretty wedding was solemnized at Mount Cashel Church yesterday morning, when Dorothy, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. P.S. Morrissey of Parade Street, became the bride of Ignatius, son of John and the late Mrs. Rumboldt of Curling.

Nuptial Mass was celebrated by Rev. T.J. Bride P.P., in the presence of the immediate relations of the happy couple. The bride, who was given away by her father, was attended by Miss Laura Morrissey, her sister, and Mr. John Meaney, ably assisted the groom. Professor Hutton, O.B.E., K.S.G. Presided at the organ and rendered pleasing voluntaries during the service.

After the Nuptial Mass and Blessing, a reception was held at Smithville, where the customary toasts were honored. Later, the bride and groom left for a nearby holiday resort, where the honeymoon will be spent. The presents received were numerous and valuable, and included a handsome gift from the bride’s former co-workers at the Canadian Bank of Commerce, the presentation being made by the Manager, Mr. A.H. Waterman, on their behalf.

The writer joins with the many friends of Mr. and Mrs. Rumboldt, in extending sincere best wishes for many years of happiness in married life.

August 1 1941 ACKNOWLEDGMENT Furness Withy & Co., Ltd. wish to thank the following, who so kindly sent magazines, playing cards, etc., to them during the month of June, for the use of Recruits joining the various Services, and the men of the Mercantile Marine: Mrs. Gerald Butt, Mrs. J.C. Hudson, Mrs. J.C. Baird, Mrs. W.S. Moores, Lady Crosbie, Mrs. A.E. Hickman, Mrs. Gertrude Sterling, Mrs. Dawe, Mr. G. Hussay, Mrs. G. Crosbie, Mr. A.E Hickman, Mr. Stephen King Jr., Miss M King, Mr. L. King, Mr. D.W. Gray, Mrs. Cummings, Brother Fleming, Miss Parker, Mrs. R. Mosdell, Mr. J.M Baird,

Also for the month of July; Miss Gertrude Carter, Mrs.R. Stick, Mrs. C. McK. Harvey, Miss E. Rendell, Miss M King, Mr. L. King, Mr. Stephen King Jr., Mrs. Dobbin, Mr. J. Macnab, Mrs. F.R. Emerson, Mrs. A.E. Hickman, Mrs. J.C. Baird, Mr. H.B.C. Lake, Lady Crosby, Mr. R.C. Shears, Messrs James Baird Ltd., Mr. H.W. Carter.

Owing to the recent heavy demands, contributions will be gratefully received.

August 1 1941 BIGAMY CHARGE BEFORE COURT A young man, aged 22 years old, resident of the Battery, was before the Magistrate’s Court yesterday morning, charged with bigamy, and a girl who lives on Lime Street was charged with aiding and abetting in the offence. When charged before Magistrate O’Neill they were not asked to plead, but were remanded on bail in the sum of $2,000.00 each. It is alleged that the bigamous marriage took place in St. John’s during the past few months, and that the wife of the man, to whom he was married about three years ago, is still living.

August 4 1941 LAID TO REST WILLIAM P. BURKE: The funeral of the late William P. Burke, a well known and respected resident of the West End, from his early days when he was a Cooper, and then afterwards followed the sea, was largely attended Thursday afternoon. Outstanding were the floral offerings of his comrades and shipmates.

It seems fitting that this man was so honored, for he represented the spirit of the forces, as we are now told, the actual loyalty of the men who years ago went across, and want to do it again. That was William Burke. And when he was laid away, and Mother earth received him, just as she had done so many more, but none so kindly, those who were left behind began to talk and think, and out of their conversations came the great and only message; he was a good man.

That is but Tribute; “He was a good man.”

Then the poppies fell, the silence was observed, and the few lingering loyal relatives of the deceased said their farewells.

The dusk lingers sometimes over Belvedere. It was a suggestion of the wistfulness which brings memories. We do hope that this Valiant Knight who fought the seas for many years, will not be forgotten. L.C.M. 

August 4 1941 DEATH: The late William P. Burke, Mercantile Marine, was laid to rest Thursday afternoon at Belvedere Cemetery. The deceased who has two sons overseas, was a brother of Pilot Martin Burke, himself a Veteran of the South African Campaign and the last Great War.

The funeral was largely attended. The Union Jack covered the casket, and War Veterans acted as pall-bearers; there were many beautiful wreaths.

At the R.C. Cathedral, Rev. Fr. Bown read the last prayers for the Dead, and at the graveside, Capt. L.C. Murphy recited the G.W.V.A. Ritual. N.J Murphy’s undertaking arrangements, and the St. John’s Branch of the G.W.V.A., Co-operated in their usual appreciation to the “thinning of the ranks.”

August 4 1941 WEDDING BELLS MATTHEWS — CAREY: Fortune Hr., July 31 — St. Anne’s Church, Fortune Hr., was the scene of a very pretty wedding on Wednesday July 23rd., when Miss Mary Carey, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Carey, became the bride of Mr Gerald Matthews of Grand Falls. Rev. Father Hinchey P.P., officiating.

The bride, attired in navy costume, with rose and navy accessories, was attended by her sister, Mrs. Louis Byrne, who wore brown accessories, while John Carey, acted as best man. As the bridal party entered the Church the bridal chorus from Lohengrin was played by Miss Glady’s Edwards.

After the ceremony, a reception was held at the home of the bride’s parents. Rev. Father Hinchey was present and spoke very suitably, commenting on the bride’s successful career as a Teacher.

The happy couple left for their home in Grand Falls on Monday, and took with them the sincere good wishes for their future happiness.

August 4 1941 MARRIED LeGROW — CAMERON: Married at Carbonear by Rev. H.M. Davis, on July 30th, at the residence of her uncle, M.A. Malcolm Cameron, Emma Wilhelmina, daughter of Alexander and the late Fannie Cameron, to Cyril Boyd, son of Mr and Mrs Arthur LeDrew of Broad Cove, District Bay de Verde.
August 4 1941 DEATHS DUNPHY — Passed peacefully away 9 p.m. Saturday, Aug 2nd, Ellen Dunphy, in her 73rd year, widow of the late Patrick Dunphy. Leaving to mourn their sad loss are; 3 sons, 2 daughters, 1 sister, and 4 brothers. Funeral today, Monday at 2.30 p.m. from her late residence 23 Central Street. May the Sacred heart of Jesus have mercy on Her Soul.

WHALEN — Passed peacefully away 5 a.m. Sunday, Francis, son of ex-Sergeant and Mrs. Whalen. Leaving to mourn their sad loss; father, mother, 1 brother, and one sister, funeral on Tuesday at 2.30 p.m. from his late residence 96 Lime Street.

August 4 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE The Trinity Enterprise states that several cases of measles have been reported in that section. Included in the victims was a visitor from St. John’s.

A man who was before Court on Saturday charged with being drunk and disorderly in his own home, was placed under bond.

Hard coal is now selling for $23.00 per ton, which is $2.00 above the price of a year ago. A shipment was landed here last week.

With 31 State forests covering 5,338,238 acres, Minnesota ranks first in area of State owned forest lands.

On Saturday, the Police were notified from the Police on Bell Island that the woman who was reported as being missing, had arrived there.

Some new vegetables were on sale Saturday in the local markets, and met ready purchase, despite the fact that prices were rather higher than in previous years.


August 6 1941 BIRTHS BUTLER — At Grace Maternity Hospital August 4th., to Brenda, wife of C.L. Butler, a son.

CURRIE — At Grace Maternity Hospital, August 4th, to Florence, wife of L.C. Currie, a Son.

August 6 1941 MARRIAGE NOTICE The marriage of Mary Catherine, daughter of Hon. T.R. Randell and Mrs. Randell, and Derry Rae Clarke, son of Mr. and Mrs. William Clarke, takes place this evening at 7.30 at the Cathedral of St. John the Baptist.
August 6 1941 MARRIAGES PRITCHARD — LYNDALE: On July 25th by Rev. W.E. Donnelly, Pastor of First United Church, Hamilton, Ont., Iyelma Sanforetta, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. S.T. Lyndale of Winnipeg, to Wallace Lamont Stuart, son of Dr. and Mrs. Lionel Pritchard of Bay Roberts.

BUDGELL — ADAMS: A quiet pretty wedding took place in Holy Trinity Church, Grand Falls, on July 26th, when Miss Jean Budgell, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. G. Budgell, First Avenue, was united in marriage to Mr. James Adams of King’s Point, Green Bay. Rev Mr. Batten officiated.

August 6 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE The Tag Day and dance, held under the auspices of the Grand Falls and Winsor Cigarette Club, went over in a big way, and the sum of $420.00 was realized. Tags realized $193.00 and the dance $227.00

Reports from West Coast salmon pools for last week show that salmon and trout were plentiful, at Lomond, Main River, Cook’s Brook, Fischel’s River, Robinson’s River, Middle Barachoix, Crabbe’s River, Highlands River. On the lower Humber fish were increasing daily, and those taken were of large size. At Flat Bay River the fish were not taking the fly well.

A Naval man who was before Court yesterday charged with being drunk and disorderly in a café at the corner of Adelaide and Water Street, was fined $3.00.

Two girls were before Court yesterday charged with stealing dress from the store of Isaac Levitz. They were remanded until Saturday.

A Truckman from St. Joseph’s was before the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, and was fined $4.00 for driving at forty miles per hour around a curve on the Topsail Road.

Two young girls were before Court yesterday and were charged with disorderly conduct. They were remanded. The evidence was that they have been giving a lot of trouble lately, remaining out all night, and giving worry to their parents. On this occasion they were arrested at 2.30 in the morning.

The Bonavista Correspondent of the Fishermen’s Advocate states, “This is an odd season in more senses than one. Amongst other unusual occurrences we are having a second caplin school, and last week men were busy on all our beaches, securing quantities of these little visitors to put in cold storage for bait purposes, and to use fresh in the gardens.

A Seaman was before the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, and was fined $3.00 for being drunk, and $2.00 as compensation for damage to a framed picture, the property of a resident of New Gower St. The evidence was that the picture was taken from the hallway of the house on Saturday night, and the Police found the accused near the Newfoundland Hotel with the picture under his arm, and the glass broken.

A car owned by Bert Stroud of Windsor, was stolen last week from Bond Street, Windsor, where it had been parked by its owner. It was later seen in a badly damaged condition, on Hospital Hill, Grand Falls, by a passerby, who promptly informed the Police. Traffic Officer Abbott was quickly on the scene, and in a phenomenally short space of time, was successful in rounding up the culprit. When the accused was taken before Court he was fined $10.00 and ordered to pay compensation for the damage done. Mr. Stroud asked that leniency be shown. — Grand Falls Advertiser.

Fishery reports from North, tells of fairly good fishing at Twillingate and Morton’s Harbor, good fishing at Joe Batt’s Arm, Tilton, Fogo, and Seldom, but very little doing South of there. In some places a shortage of salt caused inconvenience while fish was plentiful, but the arrival of an auxiliary vessel from the F.P.U. Trading Co., relieved the situation. In Lumsden North, the two firms of Robinson and Howell secured the lightest catches with around 300 quintals each. — Fishermen Advocate.

Eight residents of Grand Falls were before Court last week, charged with breaches of the Game and Inland fisheries Act. They had been salmon fishing at Point Leamington, and were charged with jigging and four-hooking salmon. Game Wardens Tilley and Troke acted as prosecutors and Mr. Hawco acted for the defendants. Some thirty fish in all were landed, and in one case, four landed in twenty minutes. At the time, the pool was full of salmon. In passing judgement, Magistrate Hollett stated the defense showed that all the men were fishing illegally. Fines of $5.00 were imposed in each case. — Grand Falls Advertiser. 


August 7 1941 BIRTHS WYMAN — At Moncton City Hospital, on Aug.5th, to Mr. and Mrs. Howard W. Wyman, a daughter.
August 7 1941 DEATHS LLOYD — Entered into rest Wednesday morning, Lena B. Nurse, widow of the late G.B. Lloyd, leaving one son and two daughters. Funeral by motor hearse on Friday at 2.30 p.m., from Weston, Topsail Road. No flowers.

FARRELL — Passed peacefully away on Wednesday, Aug. 6th at St. Clair’s Mercy Hospital, Winifred, relict of the late Patrick Farrell of Ferryland, in her 84th year: leaving 3 daughters, to mourn their sad loss. Funeral by motor hearse to Ferryland at noon today, Thursday, from the residence of her daughter, Mrs. W.J. Ashley, 71 Patrick St. May the Sacred Heart of Jesus have mercy on her soul.

McDONALD — Passed peacefully away on Wednesday, Aug 6th, Anastasia McDonald (nee Dunphy) in her 70th year; leaving to mourn their sad loss are; husband, 5 sons, 1 sister and 2 brothers. Funeral on Friday at 2.30 p.m. from her late residence, 18 Flowers Hill. May the Sacred Heart of Jesus have Mercy on her Soul.

DILLON — Passed peacefully away August 6th at 1.30 p.m., Agnes, aged 66 years, beloved wife of James Dillon, leaving to mourn husband, 2 sons, Jack, overseas with the Newfoundland Forestry, James at home, also 4 daughters, Mrs. W. Finlay, Mrs. E. Long, Mrs. H. Roberts, Agnes at home; also 2 sisters, Mrs. Voisey, of the city, Mrs. Croake in U.S.A. Funeral on Friday at 2.45 p.m. from her late residence, 63 Queen’s Road. R. I. P.

August 7 1941 ODDITIES EDDIE GERRARD — Famous hockey player and coach, died at Ottawa four year ago today. The great Ottawa Defenceman ended his playing career in 1923, and two years later, led the Montreal Maroons to the National Hockey League Championship as Manager.

WATERLESS — Some Gazelles of the Far East and South America Llamas, are so constituted that they seldom need water, and never feel the pangs of thirst.

BIRD BUILDERS — Many species of birds, now depend on homes built by the strong-billed, ambitious woodpecker, which have become the contractors and carpenters of the bird world, as a result.

August 7 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE The express leaving this afternoon will be in two sections. First and second class passengers will leave at 6. p.m. and all sleeping car passengers will leave at 6.20 p.m.

The annual pet show was held at Grand Falls last week; ninety children entered pets in ten different classes. The judges were Messrs A.G. Duggan, M. Brennan, and J Waugh. Mrs. T. Conway presented the prizes.

Despite the large crowds at the Regatta yesterday, a large number of people were out of town, and favorite holidays resorts had many visitors. The weather was ideal in all places and the day was enjoyed to the full.

A Naval Rating was before Court on Tuesday charged with assault, by a woman resident on New Gower Street. A Police Officer who was called, stated that when he arrived, the accused had grabbed the woman by the throat and had left fingerprints on her neck. The accused stated that the woman was trying to steal money from his pockets. The charge was dismissed.

A Naval Rating was before Court on Tuesday charged with assault, and pleaded not guilty. The complainant was a girl who lived on Goodridge Street and had met the accused at a dance out of town, and drove home with him in a taxi, and after leaving the taxi near her home, she was attacked. Some evidence was taken, after which adjournment was taken to permit further enquires.


August 8 1941 MARRIAGES TYNDALE – PRITCHARD: On July 25th by Rev. W.E. Donnelly, Pastor of First United Church, Zelma Sanforetta, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. S.J. Tyndale of Winnipeg, to Walter Lamont Stuart, son of Dr. and Mrs. Lionel Pritchard of Bay Roberts.
August 8 1941 DEATHS HANHAM — Died suddenly at the Grace Hospital, thursday morning, August 7th, Jacob Hanham, Barnes’ Road. Funeral on Saturday at 2.30 p.m., from his late residence, 26 Barnes Road.
August 8 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE The United Church Garden party at Clarke’s Beach has been postponed until the 27th August.

The final game in the series of card tournaments will be held at the Star of the Sea Club rooms tonight. Cash prizes will be paid.

A Canadian Soldier was before the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, and was fined $5.00 for disorderly conduct on Water Street.

During the week, 330 feet of 6 inch, cast iron pipe, was laid in Freshwater Road by Council employees. To date, 1000 feet have been laid.

A motorist before Court yesterday for not stopping his car when a red light was showing on the traffic sign at the corner of Hollaway and Duckworth streets, was fined $2.00.

At Waldegrave Street during the past week, 256 feet of ground was excavated for the curb and gutter and concrete sidewalk, and 72 feet sidewalk, and 189 lineal feet curb and gutter, were laid.

A Sailor who was before His Honor Judge Browne yesterday, charged with breaking a pane of glass in a small store on the Southside, was fined $5.00.

The Sanitary Supervisor reported to the Council yesterday, that there is at present impounded in the city stables, one bay mare, weight about 700 lbs. The animal was found roaming the streets.

The job of moving back the main line at Howley’s Grade, Corner Brook West, is progressing favorably under Railway Foreman Peckman. The construction of the 1400 feet siding between the man line and the harbor, will be carried out as soon as the other job is finished. — Western Star.

A motorist was before Court yesterday, charged with having three persons beside himself, in the driver’s seat of a motor vehicle, so placed as to interfere with the proper management of the vehicle. He was fined $5.00. The accused was in collision with another vehicle near Dunn’s Bridge on Topsail Road.

Three motorists were fined $1.00 each yesterday, for parking cars in a forbidden area. Another for the same offence, was fined $2.00.

The garden party which was to have been held at Conception Harbor last week, and was postponed owing to the weather, will now be held on Sunday next.

Some new local potatoes were offered for sale yesterday by residents of Conception Bay. As yet, they are not of very large size, but are as good as can be expected at this time of the year.

Passengers for the South Coast-St. Pierre-Halifax service will leave St. John’s at ten o’clock Saturday morning.

In the past few days, repairs with gravel, have been made to the following streets in the city: Ropewalk Lane, John Street, Quidi Vidi Lakeside, Bennett Avenue, Cabot Street, Topsail Road, Kenna’s Hill, Pennywell Road, Spencer Street, Victoria Street, Brazil’s Square, Flower’s Hill, Cookstown Road.

A reception was held in St. Peter’s Hall, Bell Island, last week, in honor of Seaman Richard Clarke, Albert Budgell, and Fred O’Brien, who were home on leave. The door receipts were divided amongst them. The address to the boys was given by Head Constable Russell, who also made presentation and address to Seamen Leo Ezekiel, and Everette Allan, at a reception tendered to them a few nights before. — The Bell Islander

A reception was held last week at Bay Roberts, in honor of Sergt. Kevin M. Joy, R.A.F., who was home on leave. The event was held in the Public Building and speakers were Rev. H. Torravan, Capt. John Parsons, Dr. W.H. Drover, Messrs W.E. Mercer, and W Hynes. Mr. E.V Hall was master of ceremonies. Two Canadian Soldiers –Walter L. Moore, and Leighton Lockart, who were in Bay Roberts at the time, were guests. Miss R.F. Parsons made the presentations. — Bay Roberts Guardian


August 10 1941 WEDDING BELLS DAVIS — BLACKWOOD: A very pretty wedding was solemnized at Gower Street United Church on July 30th, at 8 p.m. when Pearl, daughter of Capt. Edward and Mrs. Blackwood, of St. John’s, was united in marriage with Isaac, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. B.I. Davis, also of St. John’s.

The bride looked charming in a dress of white taffeta, with shoulder veil and orange blossoms, she carried a bouquet of pink and white carnations. The bride entered the Church leaning on the arm of her father, Capt. Blackwood. The matron of honor was Mrs. Hawkins, a sister of the bride, while the groom was supported by his eldest brother, Charlie. The matron of honor was dressed in pale blue taffeta, with hat and accessories to match, and carried a bouquet of carnations. The bride’s mother was dressed in navy blue crepe, and wore a corsage of white sweet peas. The mother of the groom wore a dress of rose crepe, and had a corsage of white roses. The ceremony was performed by Rev. H.M. Davis, Minister of the United Church at Carbonear, and brother of the groom.

Following the ceremony, the wedding party and about thirty guests, motored to Poppinn at Topsail, where a very delectable luncheon was enjoyed, at which the usual toasts were honored. The bride and groom are spending their honeymoon at Trinity.

It is the wish of their many friends that the future of their lives together may be very bright and happy.

MILLEY — OATS: At the United Church Manse, Buchans, June 26th, 1941, Florence Beulah, daughter of Mr. and Mrs Edwin T. Oats, Carbonear, to Walter, son of Mrs. Alfreda and the late John F. Milley, 319 LeMarchant Road, this city.

FONTAINE — HALL: At the Church of Transfiguration, Manor Road East, Toronto, August 2nd by Rev. E.L. Wasson, Lauder Fontaine, of Toronto, to Miss Stella Louise Hall, of St. John’s.

DAVIS — OSMOND: At Cochrane St. Church on Aug 8th by Rev. E.C. Knowles, Lillian J. Osmond, to Mark B. Davis.

August 10 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE Sergeant H.B. Hughes, R.R.C., St. John’s, visited here on Saturday. He registered at the Empire Hotel.

Mrs. Stephen Hall of the city, accompanied by her nieces, Miss Jean and Carol LeDrew, of Bell Island, were in town on Sunday.

Mrs. E.J. Duff, of Cathedral Street, left by Tuesday’s express for Corner Brook, where she will spend a holiday.

Miss Jennie May Stevenson is spending a holiday in the city, the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Ash.

Mr. Gaze and Mr. P.M. Lewis, of St. John’s, visited here on Sunday. They registered at the Empire Hotel.

Miss Frances Barrett, who is attending Summer School at St. John’s, visited her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Barrett, on Sunday.

Constable Ted and Mrs. Martin and child, of the city, visited here on Sunday. They were accompanied by Mr. Patrick Martin and visited their parents, Mr and Mrs. Andrew Martin.

Mrs. J. Bradbury came from the city on Monday on a visit to her sister, Mrs. Harriet Parsons.

Miss Kathleen Stapleton, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Stapleton, is spending a holiday in the city.

Miss Rose O’Donnel, of the city, spent a pleasant holiday in town.

In an assault case which was before the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, the defendant was put under bond in the sum of $100.00.

Iron hand rails on Prestcott St., McBride’s Hill, and Allandale Rd., were repaired during the past week.

Sixty-one men were working in the Sanitary Department last week, twenty-five horses were kept at the stables, and feed for them cost $151.75.


August 13 1941 AT HOME Rev. Alfred Woods will observe his 94th birthday today, Tuesday August 12th, at home, this afternoon and evening, at 69 Cochrane St.
August 13 1941 MARRIAGE BORDAS — SMITH: At St. Thomas’ Church on June 21st. 1941, by the Rev. J.H. Rhodes, Vera, Eldest daughter of Capt. and Mrs. F.D. Smith of this city, to Michael Bordas of Detroit, Mich., U.S.A.

PRESS — PUDDESTER: On Saturday August 9th, at George Street United Church, by Rev. A.F. Binnington, Minister, Mr. Cyril Walter Press, to Miss Marion Beatrice Puddester, both of St. John’s.

August 13 1941 DEATH HEALEY — Passed peacefully away yesterday forenoon. Mrs. Hanna Healey, in her 69th year; leaving to mourn one son, five grandchildren and a large number of nephews and nieces. Funeral will take place on Thursday, August 14th at 2.30 p.m., from her late residence, 14 Freshwater Road.
August 13 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE Yesterday morning, the Night Watchman at the Queen’s Wharf, picked up a small boat which was adrift in the harbor. He has it in his possession, awaiting claim by the owner.

The funeral of the late Mrs. Hannah HEALY, will take place on Thursday next, the 14th August, at 2.30 p.m. from her late residence, 14 Freshwater Road, and not on Wednesday as previously stated.

There are now nearly 20,000 more Civil Servants in London, despite evacuation, than before the war began.

An extraordinary general meeting of the Union of Municipal Workers, was held last night at the S.U.F. Hall, when amongst other business, the reply of the Council to the request for increase in wages was received.

The month of July was an exceptionally busy one in the Twillingate Hospital and 3,245 days of care were given. The average number of patients per day was 105, and there were 100 admissions during July, and 110 discharges. There were 13 births, and two deaths during the month. — Twillingate Sun.

A French–Canadian Sailor was before Court yesterday, for being drunk and being in possession of a Barber’s Pole, the owner of which was unknown. He was released on payment of a deposit.

An entertainment was held at St. Peter’s Hall on Thursday night, in honor of Seaman Fred Vokey, who is home on leave. On Friday, a grand finale was held in honor of all boys home, and who are soon to leave. — The Bell Islander.

A special meeting of the L.S.P.U. will be held tonight at eight o’clock, for the transaction of important business. All Long Shore work will cease at 6 p.m. for the purpose of this meeting.

The annual baby show will be held at Grand Falls on Friday. There will be prizes for babies (male and Female) in three groups: 1–4 months, 4–8 months, and 8–12 months, with special prizes for twins.

Through the kindness of the Officer Commanding the U.S. Base Command, the Band of the unit will give a band concert at Bannerman Park on next Sunday afternoon, in aid of the Children’s Playground Association.

Yesterday morning, about 8.20 a motor truck and a motor car were in collision on Duckworth Street, near John Maunders. The car, owned by the Hamilton Street Taxi, was about to turn, when the truck owned by Lester Bros., proceeding East, hit the car at the front door. Both vehicles were damaged considerably.

Two young girls, residents of Windsor, are now in the local prison, serving a thirty day sentence, imposed by Justice of the Peace J.W. Mitchell, in Court last Monday. The girls, it is learned, were occupied in a fight on a Windsor Street, and Constable McCarthy saw to it that the last round would be in Court House.

In the Juvenile Court yesterday, a fifteen-year old boy pleaded guilty to stealing a tin of Coco-Malt from the store of M.J. O’Brien Ltd., LeMarchant Road. Mr. Hunt, Manager of the store, stated that the Proprietor had no desire of having the accused punished by imprisonment. The accused had a record, but on this occasion sentence was suspended, though Judge Browne gave him some very sound advice as to his conduct in the future.

Preliminary discussion of plans for the formation of an Auxiliary Fire fighting Service for the town of Corner Brook and vicinity, took place at a public meeting held in the Parish Hall on Thursday evening. Owing to the small attendance at the meeting, it was decided to postpone further discussion until a more representative meeting of citizens can be convened. — Humber Herald.


August 14 1941 AT REST Ferryland loses Another Familiar Figure.

“For we are the people who made this land, — We loved it; we pass, but do not forget.”

When on Thursday of last week, there was laid to rest in the R.C. Cemetery at Ferryland, on the side of the old winding road, all that was mortal of the late Mrs. Farrell, another link with the historic past of that section was automatically broken. Deceased was one of the Kinsella family whose forebears knew and loved the tradition of the Southern Shore, especially the seat of Baltimore, and helped to sustain them. Fidelity, Simplicity, and sentimentality, were their great charm; their faith, neighborliness, and charity, found “a world where incredible beauty was daily bread and breath of life.”

At first a School Teacher, later in charge of the Branch “Anglo” Office, and eventually retired, when readjustment caused the business to close, Mrs. Farrell saw the ebb and flow of the community. The sea that rolled in from the Islets had their message; the wind that blew across from “The Pool” had its little story, and the road which lead from Johnstons to the “The Gaze”, was filled with memories. Daily Mass was an established feature in the life of this woman, and there on the marble altar slab, was inscribed the name of her only son, who had given his own young life for King and Country. In later years, she pent most of her time at the home of her daughter , Mrs. W.J. Ashley, Patrick Street, St. John’s, where the kindly welcome and understanding conversation made a visit a real pleasure.

It was fitting that she should be laid to rest with her kith and kin in the roadside Cemetery, not so far away from the old homestead, nestling close to the hillside where the fir trees are as green flames though the fog, and the breath of the woods is freshly scented.

August 14 1941 APPROACHING MARRIAGE The marriage of Joan Marie, daughter of Mr. Harry J. Howlett and Mrs. Howlett, to Dr. Robert John Simms, son of Mr. Robert H. Simms and Mrs. Simms, is taking place on Wednesday afternoon, August 20th, at three o’clock, at the Oratory of the Sacred Heart, “Littledale”.

The bride to be, is a graduate of McGill University, Montreal. Dr. Simms graduated in Medicine from Guy’s University, London England.

The bride will have two attendances. Her sister, Mrs. John P. Cheivers, is to be matron of honor, with Miss Betty Simms, sister of the bridegroom, as bridesmaid. Attending the bridegroom as best man, will be his brother Mr. Douglas Simms. The ushers are Mr. John P. Cheivers, brother in law of the bride, and Mr. Douglas Muir, cousin of the bridegroom.

A reception is to follow the ceremony at “Woodstock”, Topsail.

August 14 1941 MARRIAGE LYNCH — BEER: At the R.C. Cathedral, by Rt. Rev., Monsignor Kitchin, Douglas, son of Mr. and Mrs. James Beer, to Mollie, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Lynch, both of St. John’s.

WALSH — WALSH: At St. Patrick’s Convent Oratory on August 10th, by Rt. Rev. Monsignor Flynn, John Walsh, to Almena Walsh, both of this city.

August 14 1941 DEATH DEVEREUX — Yesterday morning Mary (Minnie) Devereux, aged 80 years; leaving a sister, Mrs. R. Callanan. Funeral on Friday at 2.30, from her late residence 114 New Gower Street. R. I. P.

FORD — At Montreal, on 8th August, Arthur Ernest Haldane, aged 37 years, son of William N. and the late Alethea M. Ford, Harbor Grace.

O’GRADY — Passed peacefully away August 12th., at 7 p.m., after a short illness, Margaret, (Peggy) aged 16 years, youngest daughter of Stephen and Sadie O’Grady, leaving to mourn, father, mother, three brothers, two sisters and a large circle of friends. Funeral today, Thursday, at 2.30 p.m., from her late residence, Top Battery Road. R. I. P. (Canada and Toronto papers copy.)

August 14 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE Blue Berries are a bit late this year, though is some places they are ripening now, and people in the country in the past few days, have secured some. In other years they were plentiful at this date.

Purchasers of common cod oil are still quoting around $165.00 per ton for the small lots which are being offered on the market. No increase in the price is at present indicated.

Mr. Michael O’Brien of Brooklyn, formerly of Cape Broyle, recently slipped while working on the premises of John Fulton Fish Market, N.Y.C., and sustained a dislocated shoulder. — Nfld Weekly.

A Sailor was before Court on Tuesday, charged with being drunk, and with attempting to steal a motor car. He was convicted on the first count, but the second charge was dismissed. He was fined $2.00.

A new addition is being made to the upper storey of the Company’s main office. The roof is being raised and four new offices are to be made, including a Counting Room and a Stationary Room, as well as offices for the Timekeepers. — The Bell Islander.

At 44.40, a family of six are living in an outhouse six feet square; husband, wife and four children. This “dwelling” which is actually a coal shed, contains but one room which serves as kitchen, living room, and sleeping quarters. Most of the family have to stay outdoors, while meals are being prepared, no matter what the weather conditions are. — Bell Islander

The weather on Labor Day was very unfavorable at Botwood, and that spoiled the plans that had been made for the occasion. However the people made the best of things.

Mr. Joseph Bolger of Brooklyn, and formerly of Flatrock, Nfld., recently secured a position with the British Purchasing Commission in New York, and had been transferred to Bridgeport, Conn.

Some continued advance is seen in cured meats, spare ribs moving up about $3.00, and ham and bacon continuing their upward course, which is likely to carry them to further heights. Peas and beans declined slightly, as did onions. Oranges however, moved up strongly, and all fresh fruit appears to be higher, chiefly due to freight, it is said. — Nfld Trade Review.

A French Canadian Sailor was before Court on Tuesday, charged with being drunk and disorderly, and being in possession of a bottle of liquor on which there was a defaced label. He was convicted and fined 46.00. When arrested he had in his possession a Barber Pole and he was charged with stealing this, also. For this, sentence was suspended.

Last week, a prisoner who was locked up for the night in the Bell Island Goal, made his escape whilst the Police were called away to another matter. Breaking a hole through the wall in his cell, he got into the next cell, the door of which was open. He then made his way into the Court Room, and wrenched the bar in front of the bench from its moorings. Upsetting the Magistrate’s chair, proceeded to the Magistrate’s Office, and strewed the floor with papers. Then he visited the Police Office, and in rummaging around, found two revolvers. Pocketing these, he let himself out the front door, and decamped. He was rounded up the next day and the stolen property recovered. He was removed to the Penitentiary. — The Bell Islander.


August 15 1941 PERSONAL The marriage of Louise McNamara, daughter of the Hon. Frank and Mrs. McNamara, with Captain Frederick Gibbon Wray, 1st Battalion Victoria Rifles of Canada, son of Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Owen Wray of Montreal, will take place at the Convent of Mercy, Military Road, Monday August 18th at 3 p.m.

Mr. Hugh Gillis, West Coast Co-operative Field-Man, recently went to Sydney, N.S. at the invitation of the Lobster firm of Burnam and Morrel. The lobster market organization on the West Coast is the largest in the world. Before returning to Placentia Bay, Mr. Gillis will spend a few days on the West Coast conferring with other Co-Operative marketing leaders.

Mr. L. Handrigan, Asst, Auditor for the Co-operative Socities, is in Grand Falls studying Co-operative business methods, under Mr. H. Fletcher, Manager of the Grand Falls Co-operative Society , Ltd.

Mr. Isaac Newell of Cupids, is doing a fine job as Field-Worker for the International Grenfell Association. Mr. Newell has been conducting a Co-operative educational program in St. Anthony and vicinity, since January.

Mr. H. Newell of the Gosling Memorial Library, who has spent a month’s vacation at his summer residence, arrived in town yesterday.

Mr. C. Rowe, retired employee of the Western Union Cable Co., at Heart’s Content, left for home yesterday after spending a short vacation in the city. The greatly decreased activities of the Western Union at Heart’s Content, together with the withdrawal of the A.N.D. Co., have had a bad effect on the economic life of the town.

Mr. J. Hicks of Catalina, is in the city on business. Mr. Hicks has been associated with the Lighthouse Department for twenty one years; and at present, is engaged in effecting repairs to the Lighthouse on Green Island.

Mr. Gordon Abbott of Bonavista, who recently had an operation at the General Hospital, is now feeling fine.

Ranger R. Dingwell has been transferred to St. Anthony.

August 15 1941 SOLDIERS FINED The five Canadian Soldiers who caused damage to property of H.W. Winsor, on Water Street West, were before the Magistrate yesterday afternoon, and were convicted. They were fined $20.00 each for disorderly conduct, and $15 each to pay damages.
August 15 1941 WEDDING BELLS WALSH — WALSH: A very pretty wedding was solemnized on Sunday last, August 10th, at St. Patrick’s Convent Oratory, by the Rt. Rev. Monsignor T.J. Flynn, when Miss Almena Walsh was united in holy bonds of matrimony to Mr. John Walsh, both of the city.

The bride attired in blue duchess satin with accessories to match, and carrying a bouquet of pink and white carnations with maiden hair fern, looked charming. She was attended by her sister in law, Mrs. James Walsh, who was becomingly attired in blue. Mr. Maurice Walsh, brother of the groom, performed the duties of best man.

After the ceremony, the bridal party motored along the Marine Drive through Torbay, returning to the home of the groom, where the wedding banquet was held, during which the usual toasts were proposed and ably responded to by the groom. The happy couple were the recipients of may useful and beautiful gifts, testifying to the high esteem in which both are held.

Their many friends wish Mr and Mrs. Walsh a happy and prosperous voyage over the matrimonial sea. The honeymoon will be spent at Mount Pearl.

LYNCH — BEER: A very pretty wedding was solemnized Tuesday evening at the R.C. Cathedral, the officiating Clergyman being the Right Rev. Monsignor Kitchin. The contracting parties were Miss Lollie Lynch, daughter of Mr and Mrs. James Lynch of 60 Barnes Road, and Mr Douglas Beer, son of Mr James Beer of 14 Bond Street.

The bride entered the Church accompanied by her father, who gave her away. She was beautifully attired in a mustard colored dress of crepe de chene, with contrasting accessories. She carried a bouquet of sweet peas and carnations, and looked most charming. She was attended by her sister, Miss Pauline Lynch, who wore a dress of Pink crepe de chene, with blue hat. The groom was supported by Mr. Stephen McLoughlin.

After the ceremony, the wedding party, which was quite large, motored through the city, afterwards returning to the home of the bride’s parents, where the weeding feast was partaken of. The toast to the bride and groom was proposed by Councilor Jim Spratt, and was responded to by Mr. James Lynch, on behalf of the happy couple. Speeches were also made by Mr Tom Doheny and Mr. William J. Woodford.

A musical program arranged by “Tom” Doheny, who was toastmaster, was most interesting, and was much enjoyed. The participants in the program were Messrs. Tom Doheny, William J. Woodford, James Lynch, Thomas Lynch, Jack and Stan Lynch, Mrs. Wiliam J Woodford, and Misses Lynch, and Clooney. A most enjoyable evening was spent.

The happy couple were the recipients of many useful and valuable presents. The bride and groom left for “Pop Inn”, Topsail, where they will spend their honeymoon. Their host of friends wish them a happy wedded life.

August 15 1941 NOTE OF THANKS Mrs. Patrick Byrne and daughter, desire to thank Fathers Peddle, and Terry, for their many visits to their beloved husband and father, also those who sent flowers, sympathy cards, Mass Cards and letters of sympathy, and all kind friends who assisted them in any way.
August 15 1941 BORN STRONG — Born at St. Claire’s Mercy Hospital, August 14th, to Beryl, wife of Dr. R.R. Strong, a son.
August 15 1941 DEATHS WILLIAMS — Passed away August 3rd., at Conway, South Carolina, U.S.A., Lillian Fogwell, wife of Peter Williams, formerly of St. John’s, aged 61 years.

PARSONS — Passed peacefully away after a long illness, Mary E. widow of the late W.H. Parsons, leaving four daughters, Lorraine, Mrs. R.T. Stick, Mrs. A.M Wilson, Mrs. F.R. Clarke, funeral Saturday, at 2.30 p.m., by motor hearse from “The Oaks” Carpasian Road. No flowers.

August 15 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE At Freshwater Road, Council employees laid 300 feet, cast iron pipe during the past week. To date, 3000 feet have been laid there.

A truck driver before Court yesterday, was fined $1.50 for passing approaching traffic at a speed greater that 25 miles an hour. He was fined $3.00 additional for driving without a licence.

A man was before Court yesterday, charged with being under the influence of liquor whilst in charge of a car. The case was postponed till next Thursday. It is stated the man was in a collision and refused to stop.

As a result of the rainstorm on Wednesday night, some of the city streets are in very bad condition again, as gravel which had filled potholes, has been washed out.

The driver of a motor van was fined $3.00 yesterday, for doing 30 miles per hour on LeMarchant Road. A driver who was doing 35 miles was fined $4.00.

Complaint has been received by the Police, that windows are being smashed by air rifles in various parts of the city. The Chief of Police has issued orders to prosecute all offenders.

A meeting of the Union of the Municipal Workers was held last night, which addresses were given by Brothers Frampton and Lush of the Newfoundland Federation of Labor.

The recent fire near Corner Brook Foundry, destroyed a small building owned by Bowaters Nfld. Pulp and Paper Mills Ltd., where in several dozen machine pattens had been stored, all of which were lost in the fire. — Western Star.

The Stephenville Correspondent of the Western Star, states that work on the Branch Railway leading from White’s road to Stephenville, may be hampered owing to the lack of workmen and delayed equipment. So far, less than one hundred men have been engaged, where some four hundred may be employed.

The driver of a Canadian Army vehicle, who was driving at a speed of forty miles per hour, was before the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, and was fined $4.00. He stated he was in a hurry getting a Nurse to a Hospital, and was not aware of the speed limit.

A farmer was before Court yesterday, and was fined $5.00 for having defective brakes on his car. The evidence showed the foot brake test showed only 10 per cent efficiency, and the hand break, nil. The car is 20 years old. The Chief of Police who conducted the prosecution, stated he would bring the matter of the condition of the car to the attention of the High Roads Department.

Harmon Air Field, Stephenville, was the scene of a wedding on the Afternoon of Saturday, August 9th, when Miss Helen Ruth Crane, of Boston, was united in marriage to Mr. Charles Joseph Ryan, an American National, employed as Head Timekeeper with the N.B.C. at Stephenville. The ceremony was performed by Rev. Father Brennan at the Community House, which had been specially decorated for the occasion. — Western Star

Passing through Bannerman Park last evening, a member of the Staff of the News, saw some Soldiers who had just finished a bottle, breaking the empty on the iron fence which separates the Playgrounds from the main park. One wonders if the seriousness of this is considered, with so many small children using the park and crawling around on hands and knees. Some of them are in danger of being seriously cut with the fragments of glass. It is probable that thoughtlessness was the cause, but whatever it was, surely such a practice is unnecessary.


August 17 1941 OBITUARY THOMAS FIANDER: SYDNEY MINES, Aug. 9 — Mrs. J Stratton has received word of the death of her twin brother, Thomas Finder, which occurred at English Harbor West, Fortune, following a lengthy illness.

Mr. Fiander will be remembered by many on the Northside, as he was for several years employed with the N.S.S. and C. Co., at Sydney Mines.

Surviving, are two sisters, Mrs. Stratton at Sydney Mines; Mrs. Jane Fiander, now visiting with her son, Capt. Clarence Fiander, North Sydney, and one brother, John, in Newfoundland, and three daughters, Mrs. Betty Shea, St. John’s; J. Harris, Fortune Bay, and Mrs. Thomas Tobin, Sydney.

August 17 1941 WEDDING BELLS POTTLE — YETMAN: A very pretty wedding was solemnized in Wesley Church on Tuesday, August 5th, when Miss Helen Blanche Pottle, became the bride of Mr. Roy A. Yetman. The marriage service was conducted by Rev. C.R. Blount, B.D. Both the bride and groom formerly belong to Harbor Grace. After the honeymoon, they will take up residence at Markland, where the groom is employed in the Furniture Factory. Their many friends offer felicitation.

RISK — BRAGG: A quiet but very pretty wedding, took place at Topsail United Church last evening, when Reta Margaret, daughter of Supervisor E.J. and the late Mrs. Bragg, Port aux Basques, was joined in marriage to Robert C. Risk of Sandusky, Ohio, U.S.A.

The ceremony was performed by the Rev. Sturge. The bride was given in marriage by her brother Fred, and was attended by Miss C. Forsey. The groom was supported by Mr. Walter Thistle. During the signing of the Register, Miss Marjorie Dalton, accompanied by Mrs. Butler, sang, “I Love You Truly.”

After the ceremony, the wedding party motored to “Woodstock”, where a most enjoyable evening was spent. At the conclusion of the customary toasts, the bride and groom left for the Southern Shore, and carried with them best wishes from their many friends.

August 17 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE The express train leaving on Tuesday will make connection at Humbermouth for regular points on the above mentioned service.

A truck driver who was charged with being drunk in charge of a motor car, was before Court yesterday, and his licence was suspended for six months.

In connection with the garden party at Mundy Pond tomorrow, traffic regulations have been drawn up and are published today, over the signature of the Chief of Police. Drivers of vehicles that will be in the vicinity tomorrow, would do well to familiarize themselves with the regulations.


August 18 1941 WOMAN HIT BY MOTOR CAR At 6 p.m. Saturday, Mrs. Dunphy, Parade Street, while crossing the road opposite McDonald’s Fruit store, was hit by a motor car, which was going West on Harvey Road at the time. She was cut about the head, and was taken to St. Claire’s Hospital, where it was later found that her injuries were not serious.
August 18 1941 HOSTELS FOR SERVICEMEN TAKING SHAPE Contract Let for K of C Hostel Site Sought by Y.M.C.A.

Plans are rapidly taking shape for the erection of the Canadian Auxiliary Service, of two substantial Hostels in St. John’s, one of which will be run by the Knights of Columbus, and the other by the Y.M.C.A. The K of C Hostel is to be erected on the North side of Harvey Road, East of the C.L.B. Armory, and it is understood that a contract for its erection has been let to a Canadian Firm. Rrepresentatives of the Y.M.C.A. are at present in St. John’s, and the only matter that is holding up the erection of its Hostel, is the difficulty in finding a suitable place.

August 18 1941 NFLD AIRMEN NOW ON DUTY IN UNITED KINGDOM All Have Been Trained In Canada Under The British Commonwealth Air Training Scheme

The following is a list of Newfoundland Airman, trained in Canada under the British Commonwealth Airmen Scheme, and now on duty in the United Kingdom.: —

798500 Sgt. WOAG, ANDERSON, Alastair M.

798501 Sgt. Pilot BANIKHIN, Lawrence

798502 Sgt. WOAG. BEESO, Walter Edward

798503 Sgt. WOAG BRETT, John.

798504 Sgt. Pilot BROWN, Arthur.

798506 Sgt. BROWN, Reginald Wiseman

798507 Sgt. WOAG BURRY, Lloyd George

798508 Sgt. WOAG CAMPBELL, Colin David

798509 Sgt. WOAG COOK, R. Keith

798510 Sgt. WOAG EBSARY, Samuel Henry

798511 Sgt WOAG ELMAS, Clement Loane

798513 Sgt. WOAD FORBES, Clive Robert S.

798514 Sgt. A.G. FROUDE, Baxter.

798515 Sgt. A.O. GALLANT, Thomas Cyril (Deceased)

798516 Sgt. WOAG GILL, Robert Gordon

798518 Sgt. Pilot GOSSE, Eric Martin.

S798519 Sgt. Pilot GREEN, John Gordon

798520 Sgt. A.O. GREEN, William

798521 Sgt. Pilot HOUSE, Edwin Arthur

798522 Sgt. WOAG JEANS, Donald Templeman

798523 Sgt. WOAG JOHNSTON, Clifton H .

798524 Sgt. WOAG KENNEDY, Thomas Hubert .

798525 Sgt. WOAG KING, Robert Fowlow.

798526 Sgt. Pilot LEARNING, William James

798527 Sgt. Pilot MADDICK, Harold, M.

798529 Sgt. WOAG McDONALD, George

798530 Sgt. Pilot McRAE, John Roderick.

798531 Sgt. WOAG MOAKLER, Edward P.

S798532 Sgt. Pilot MORGAN, Herbert B.

798533 Sgt. WOAG MOORES, Jas.

798534 Sgt. A.O. MORRIS , Ralph C.

798535 Sgt. WOAG NEARY, Harold Francis.

798536 Sgt. WOAG NEWBURY, Robert Owen

798538 Sgt. WOAG NORMORE, Eric Stanley

798539 Sgt. WOAG O’GRADY, Gregory James

798540 Sgt. WOAG PARSONS, Harry Hubert.

798541 Sgt.WOAG PARSONS, Douglas

798542 Sgt. Pilot QUINLAN, Donald, W.

798543 Sgt. A.O. SAINT, Alexander D.

798545 Sgt. WOAG STEWART, Charles Henry

798547 Sgt. A. G. THOMAS, James M.

798548 Sgt Pilot TILLEY, Rex

798549 Sgt. A.O. TRASK, Joseph Louis.

798550 Sgt. Pilot VATCHER, Walter Cyril

798551 Sgt. WOAG WHITE, Bernard H.

798552 Sgt. WOAG BLACKMORE, Lester J.

798553 Sgt. WOAG BRACE, Alexander A.

798554 Sgt. WOAG BRAZIL James Leo

798555 Sgt. WOAG BYRNE, Kenneth E.

798556 Sgt.WOAG CLARKE, Herbert B.

798557 Sgt. WOAG CURRIE, Alfred J.

798558 Sgt. Pilot DELANEY, Thomas J.

798559 Sgt. WOAG FALK, Frederick, H.

798560 Sgt. WOAG GOVER, Henry Patrick

798561 Sgt. Pilot GRUCHY, Philip

798562 Sgt. WOAG GUY, Wilfred F.

798565 Sgt. Pilot LACEY, David Brendon

798566 Sgt. Pilot LEARING, Harold, Lewis ***

798567 Sgt. Pilot MERCER, Robert Clayton.

798569 Sgt. WOAG NOSEWORTHY, Bertram

798570 Sgt. WOAG PIPPY, Arthur Earl

798574 Sgt. ROWSELL, Harry

798575 Sgt. A.G. SHARPE, William John.

798576 Sgt. WOAG SINNOTT, John D.

S798577 Sgt. Pilot WHITE, Randell George

798579 Sgt. WOAG ROLLS, HARRY R.

S. — Selected for Commission in the Royal Air force

August 18 1941 PERSONAL Miss Dorothy Duff R.N., arrived from New York by Saturday’s train, to spend a well earned vacation with her mother, Mrs. David Duff, 60 LeMarchant Road.

Mr. Myles Murphy, son of Mr. and Mrs. J.B. Murphy, of East Wabana, Bell Island, came to the city on Saturday, for his final Medical examination, for the Nfld. Squadron of the Royal Air Force. He was accompanied by Mr. Leonard Kent, who is also a volunteer for the R.A.F., and whose brother Tom, is now in training with the R.C.A.F.

Mr. A. Ashford of Harbor Breton, has been receiving treatment at the General Hospital, and is now feeling fine. The Banking Schooner on which Mr. Ashford was a member of the crew when he became ill, landed three thousand quintals of fish. At this time there is a scarcity of bait.

Mrs. Peter McBay of St. John’s is leaving soon for Catalina to visit her parents, Mr. and Mrs G. Granger.

Mr. C. Pye who is working in town, leaves soon to spend a few days with his family at Brooklyn B.B.

Miss V. Small, who will be teaching at Bishop’s Falls during the coming school year, is visiting friends in the city.

Mr. Jesse Butt, Merchant of Western Bay, is spending a while in the city on business.

Mr. Freeman Dove, has been visiting settlements in Placentia Bay, explaining the techniques of Bookkeeping to Co-operative Societies, as well as auditing their accounts. 

August 18 1941 DEATHS McGRATH — Passed peacefully away on August 16th, at the General Hospital, after a short illness, Patrick, in his 13th year, son of James and Bridget McGrath, leaving to mourn; father, mother, four brothers and one sister. Funeral today, Monday, at 2.30 p.m. from his late residence, Blackhead Road. R. I. P.

DILLON — Passed peacefully away on Sunday, August 17th, Mary Frances, widow of the late Capt. Patrick J Dillon, in her 68th year. Left to mourn, besides 6 sons, 2 daughters, and a number of grandchildren, are 2 sisters, and 2 brothers. Funeral on Tuesday, at 2.30 p.m. from her late residence, 94 Lime Street. R. I. P.

August 18 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE Blueberries were sold in St. John’s on Saturday for the first time this year. They were of fine size and met with ready demand.

New Potatoes were sold on Saturday at 27 cents per gallon. Though the price was considered high, householders preferred to pay that, that 20c for last season’s, which at present are in very poor condition.

During the month of November, a dance will be held in Shields Acme Hall, Brooklyn, under the auspices of the Newfoundland Special Needs Association of New York, the proceeds of which will be devoted to the care of sick and poor in Newfoundland. Nfld. Weekly.

Thomas Michael Mullaly, aged thirty-eight years, who was the Driver of the car which was involved in the accident which occurred at Northern Bay on July 27th, was committed for trial at the Supreme Court on a charge of manslaughter, on Friday. The preliminary hearing took place before Magistrate Ash of Carbonear, and fifteen witnesses were examined. Sergeant Case conducted the investigation.

At the Magistrate Court on Saturday afternoon, the evidence of Dr. Anderson was taken in the Magisterial Enquiry into the cause of the death of the late Alan Norris at Bell Island. The victim, it will be remembered, fell over the cliff, and his body was picked up in the land wash. The enquiry was held at Bell Island before Magistrate, but Dr. Anderson, who made the post mortem examination, and one other witness, was heard here, before His Honor Judge Brown.

The Nfld. Weekly states that Richard, son of Mr and Mrs. Edward Lahey of Brooklyn, is a patient at Brooklyn. He fell off his bicycle on his head, sustaining a fractured skull and concussion to the brain. Immediate treatment was given by Dr. John A Day, and later by Dr. Browder, a brain specialist, who was called for consultation with Dr. Davis. Mr. Dehney senior, is President of the Original Newfoundlanders, Inc., Brooklyn.

A Canadian Soldier appeared before the Magistrate’s Court on Saturday, charged with a series of offences against a sixteen year old girl, whose home is on McKay St. The accused is twenty years old. It is alleged that the assault took place on the Blacklmarsh Road on Thursday night. The matter was reported to the Police of Friday, and the accused was arrested by Sergts. Mahoney and Roche. The complainant said she knew the accursed since June, but that was the first time she was out with him alone. On Saturday, a preliminary enquiry into the charge was begun, and some evidence was taken, following which adjournment was taken until today.


August 19 1941 BRAVE HEART AT REST [The following caption is written underneath a picture of Sgt. Pilot H. L. Learning. GW.]

Sgt. Pilot H. L. Learning, R.A.F., Son of Mr and Mrs. George Learning, who was killed on active service on Saturday August 16th. The gallant Airman who had laid down his life, was 22 years old, and was trained in Canada, under the Empire Air Training Scheme. His father is a veteran of the last war, and served with the Royal Nfld Regiment.

The news of the sad passing of 789566, Sgt. Pilot Harold Lewis Learning, R.A.F., in the United Kingdom, has come as a tragic reminder of the War, to his many friends here, and particularly to those who are Comrades of his father, No. 765 George Learning, well known Veteran of the last Conflict.

At such a time we can try to realize the truth — poignant that it is — of the lines:

“Can our chill comfort chase away The sorrow from beloved eyes?”

The thousands who heard his fine clear, youthful voice on the Recruiting Broadcast, before he left St. John’s for overseas, will recollect his confident tone, and the substance of his brief message, “We shall break the might of Death’s impentratable pall, for God and Country and the right, if ye but sound the bugle call.” Rest on brave heart.

The deepest sympathetic feelings of our Countrymen are with Mr. and Mrs. Learning this morning, in the moment of their proud sorrow; and when the roses fade and winter brings the evanescent veil of snow, the names of our gallant Airmen who have gone forward, should not, must not be forgotten.

August 19 1941 WEDDING BELLS WRAY — McNAMARA: A very quiet and pretty wedding was solemnized at the Convent of Mercy, Military Road, yesterday afternoon, when Louise McNamara, daughter of Hon. F. and Mrs. McNamara, became the bride of Captain Frederick Gibbon Wray, 1st Battalion, Victoria Rifles of Canada, son of Frederick Owen and Mrs. Wray of Ste Rose Quebec. Only the immediate friends were present. Rev. Fr. F. Bradshaw performed the ceremony.

The bride wore a gown of heavy white corded silk, embossed with chenille, and her veil of tulle illusion was held in place by a silver coronet, with orange blossoms. She carried a cascade bouquet of carnations. The matron of honor, Mrs. Basil Hutton, twin sister of the bride, wore a gown of Churchill Blue fine lace. Miss Joan McNamara was bridesmaid, and wore a rose-beige lace gown. Their head dresses were in contrasting colors, and they carried bouquets of multi-color sweet peas. The groom was attended by Dr. J. Arch McNamara, and Mr. Basil Hutton was usher. The bride’s mother wore a gown of flowered chiffon and carried a sheaf of blue delphinium. The Wedding march was played by professor Charles Hutton, O.B.E., K.S.G.

After the ceremony the reception was held at the home of the bride’s parents, where the usual toasts were duly honored.

The bride’s going away outfit was a Jersey silk dress of floral design, over a blue wool coat, with hat to match, and a scarf of silver foxes.

August 19 1941 NFLD SEAMAN MISSING AT SEA Information has been received by the Department of Public Health and Welfare, from the Registrar of Seamen, Cardiff, to the effect that P.P. POWER, of the Mercantile Marine, is missing at sea, his ship having been torpedoed.

Steps were at once taken to have his next of kin, father Patrick Power, 429 South Side, St, John’s, notified accordingly.

August 19 1941 POOR FISHERY AT MUSGRAVE HR. The fishing season ay Musgrave Harbor has ended with a discouraging result, well below last year’s average catch. It was to have been expected that the total catch would be lower than usual, as many men have secured employment elsewhere, and about thirty young men are overseas, yet the chief reason for this year’s failure is the extremely rough weather, which drove the fish into deep water.
August 19 1941 CREDIT SOCIETY GRATE’S COVE The Credit Society, Grate’s Cove, has been registered under the Co-operative Act: and, in accordance with the plan for training Co-operative leaders, Mr. Benson of Grate’s Cove has been at Ferryland and Pouch Cove, to gain further experience in filleting and merchandising.

This coming winter, the fishermen will have study clubs in operation, and will endeavor to build up their credit Society by systematic savings.

August 19 1941 WEDDING BELLS JOHNSON — BAIRD: The marriage of Jean, daughter of Mrs. and the late Robert D. Baird of Hamilton Avenue, to Carol, son of Mr. and Mrs. C. Johnson of Lynn, Mass., took place at Gower Street United Church on Saturday, August 16th., the Rev. J.E. Bell officiating. The bride was attired in powder blue dress and hat with navy accessories, and wore a corsage of carnations. The bridesmaid was Miss Alma Heath, who wore a fawn dress with hat to match. The groom was attended by Mr. Gordon Baird, brother of the bride.

After the wedding ceremony, the bridal party motored to “Butterpot’ Hostel where supper was served, and the usual toasts honored. The honeymoon is being spent at Holyrood.

The bride was formerly an employee of Ayre & Sons, the groom is a member of the staff of Riverside Accessories Ltd., St. John’s.

Their many friends join in extending felicitations.

August 19 1941 NOTE OF THANKS Mr and Mrs. Robert Guest and family, Southside Road, desire to express their thanks and appreciation to Rev. Canon Stirling, Dr. Carnell, the Doctors and Nurses of the Sanatorium, for their kindness and attention during the illness of their daughter and sister, the late Elizabeth Guest, and to all kind friends who forwarded wreaths, sprays, cards, letters, and in other various ways, expressed their sympathy, thereby giving consolation and lessening the grief caused in their bereavement.
August 19 1941 DEATHS LEARNING — On active service Saturday, August 16th, 1941, Sergt. Pilot Harold Lewis Learning, R.A.F., aged 22 years, son of Mr and Mrs. George Learning, leaving father, mother, three brothers, and four sisters, also a large circle of friends, to mourn their sad loss.

McLOUGHLAN — Passed peacefully away on August 18th after a long illness, Michael McLaughlan, (Carpenter) aged 78 years, leaving to mourn one son and three daughters, Mrs. J. Byrne of Bishop’s Falls, Mrs. Joseph Spencer of Boston, and Kathleen of Boston, and one grandson. Funeral on Wednesday at 2.15 p.m. from his son’s residence, Stephen McLoughlan, 93 Craigmillar Avenue. R. I. P. Boston papers please copy.

August 19 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE The Mundy Pond Regatta will be continued tomorrow afternoon. The usual teas and refreshments will be served.

Both sections of the Express which arrived in town yesterday were late. Passengers stated the delay was caused by the derailment of some freight cars in the Western Division.

The financial statement of the Corner Brook Co-operative Society Limited, which is published elsewhere in this issue, shows a rapid expansion of that Society during th past six months.

In the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, six drunks were fined $1.00 each.

One man was convicted of a breach of the Alcoholic Liquors Act and fined $10.00, in the Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

A Soldier was up before Court yesterday, charged with obstructing the Police. He was remanded for eight days.

A Motorist was fined $3.00 yesterday at the Magistrate’s Court, for speeding around a bend, and $1.00 for passing traffic at high speed.

Two Seamen were before Court yesterday, charged with being drunk and disorderly, and doing malicious damage. Both were fined $5.00 or 7 days for being drunk and disorderly, one was fined $20.00 for maliciously damaging a window, and the other was fined $5.00 for the same offence. Both men were also fined compensation for damage done.

The playing of the American Band at Bannerman Park on Sunday afternoon, attracted a huge crowd. Hundreds of children enjoyed the stirring music, listening with rapt attention. The whole Park was filled with life and colors. Yet there was no milling or disorder. Unfortunately, the interested crowd of music lovers was forced to leave and seek shelter, when rain began to fall.


August 21 1941 WEDDING BELLS KING — MURPHY: A very pretty wedding took place at the R.C. Cathedral on Saturday last, when Sgt. Leonard King of the Canadian Forces was united in marriage with Miss Catherine Murphy of Torbay, the ceremony being performed by Rt. Rev.. Msgr. Kitchin, V.G.

The bride was attended by Miss Loreta Wilson of the Avalon Telephone Co., and the groom was supported by Sgt. Waine Resmussen.

After the wedding ceremony, a reception was held at the home of Mr and Mrs. James Wilson, Boncloddy Street, where supper was served and the usual toasts honored. The many presents received by the bride and groom testified to their popularity.

GIOVANINNI — MURRAY: At the Oratory, Littledale on Monday August 18th, with Nuptial Mass, celebrated by Rev. J.J. Murray, Clestine J. Giovaninni to Olivia Murray, both of St. Lawrence.

August 21 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE The Railway announces that baggage for Express trains will not be checked after 5.45 p.m, Tuesday and Thursday.

The Sherbrooke Fusiliers Regimental Brass Band will be holding a band concert at Bannerman Park at 3.30 Sunday afternoon. A collection will be taken up at the gate in aid of the Children’s Playground Association.

A.L. Barrett, Editor of the Western Star, Curling, accompanied by Mrs. Barrett, left by the Overland Limited Monday afternoon, (Aug 11th) for Quebec, to attend the annual convention of the Canadian Weekly Newspapers Association. — The Humber Herald

Time and again we have endeavored to stress the need for the formation of some type of local Government in West Corner Brook. With the passing of the Contributory Assistance Act, the way was smoothened for the establishment of a Municipality in this thickly populated community, and there seems to be no good reason why our citizens should not grasp the helping hand which is held out by the Government, with this end in view. — The Humber Herald.


August 22 1941 NAVAL CASUALTY The Director of Recruiting has been informed of the following Newfoundland Naval casualty, by the Trade Commissioner for Newfoundland, in London, England. PENNELL, Roland, Climit, Able Seaman, JX181415, Death by accident. Funeral at Falmouth, England, August 21st 1941. Next of kin, father, William Pennell, Gilesport, Twillingate.
August 22 1941 LAID TO REST All that was mortal of the late John Price, who died at Petty Harbor on Monday, after an illness of only a few hours, was laid to rest on Wednesday morning, following requiem Mass in the R.C. Church at that place. Deceased was well known and highly esteemed. He was engaged at the fishery, and was working at his boat, when seized with an attack, from which he rallied for a very short while, but eventually passed away, after receiving the Sacrament. He was 79 years of age.
August 22 1941 HIT AND RUN DRIVER NOT YET KNOWN Victim of Accident Still Unconscious

Stanley Duggan, Naval Rating, who was inured on Waterford Bridge Road shortly before midnight, Tuesday, when a car that did not stop, hit and knocked him down, was still in an unconscious condition at the Military Hospital last evening. The owner of the hit and run car has not yet been located.

August 22 1941 PERSONAL Mrs. James Batten of Bareneed is spending a few days with her daughter, Mrs. A. Roach, at St. John’s.

Mr. W.H. Stevenson, representative of the Mutual Life Insurance Co., left the city yesterday for Bell Island.

Mrs. P. Adey of Medford Mass. U.S.A. and her son Leonard, are visiting friends at Hant’s Hr.

Mr. Garland Templeton of Brownsdale arrived in town on the 20th August.

Miss Jean Pye left the City yesterday for her home at Brooklyn B.B.

Mr. L.W. Shaw, B.A., Secretary for Education, arrived in the city yesterday from a vacation in Canada.

The Hapgood Triplets, (boys) sons of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hapgood, Craigmiller Avenue, today reached their first birthday. Many happy returns of the day.

August 22 1941 WEDDING BELLS SIMMS — HOWLETT: At the Oratory of the Sacred Heart, St. Bride’s College, Littledale, on Wednesday August 20th, at 3.p.m., was solemnized the wedding of Joan Marie, younger daughter of Harry J. Howlett and Mrs. Howlett, to Dr. Robert John Simms, son of Mr. Robert H. Simms and Mrs. Simms. The Rev. P.J. Kennedy officiated.

The bride who was given in marriage by her father, wore chiffon organza and her veil of tulle illusion was held in place by a tiny Dutch hat. She carried talistiny and sweetheart roses in a cascade effect. The matron of honor, Mrs. John Cheivers, wore a gown of hyacinth blue pebble crepe, with its wide lapels hand embroidered in multi colors. She carried snapdragon shading from pale pink to maroon. Miss Betty Simms, the bridesmaid, was gowned in golden maize sheer organza. She wore a small Dutch floral hat, and carried snapdragons of yellow and tawny colors. Mr. Douglas Simms attended his brother as best man. Mr. Douglas Muir and Mr. John Cheivers ably performed the duties of ushers.

Mrs. Howlett, mother of the bride, wore silk jersey of a smoky blue color, and a corsage of flame roses. Mrs. Simms, the mother of the groom, work beige silk crepe with brown accessories, and silver fox scarf. She wore a corsage of sweet peas. Miss May O’Neill, AT.C.L., played the wedding march.

The reception was held at Woodstock where the bridal party accepted the best wishes of their friends under a huge wedding bell, which was the artistic work of Mr. T. O’Mara, who very pleasantly surprised the bride and groom by sending it to them.

The toast to the bride was proposed by Rev. Fr. Kennedy and responded to by the groom, who made the toast to the attendants, which was replied to very ably by Mr. Douglas Simms. The bride wore for traveling, natural color wool with brown.

August 22 1941 MARRIAGES CLEARY — BAKER: At the oratory of the Sacred Heart, Convent of Mercy, Military Road, at 3 p.m. August 22nd, 1916, [Exactly as written – GW] by Rev. Dr. Greene, Minnie, daughter of Thomas and the late Catherine Baker, to Richard, son of Sergt. and Ellen Cleary.

SIMMS — HOWLETT: At the Oratory of the Sacred Heart, St. Bride’s College, Littledale, on Wednesday, August 20th by Rev. P.J. Kenney, Joan Marie, younger daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H.J. Howlett, to Dr. Robert John Simms, son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Simms.

August 22 1941 DEATHS BISHOP — Capt. George Bishop of 156 Gower Street, city, aged 73 years, passed away 2 p.m. Thursday, August 21, 1941, leaving to mourn wife, 4 sons and 3 daughters, 3 brothers and 5 sisters. Funeral 2.30 p.m. today, Friday, to Gower Street Church, where service will be held at 3 p.m.
August 22 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE Passengers for the South Coast-St. Pierre-Halifax service will leave St. John’s at 10 a.m. tomorrow, Saturday.

One hundred and fifteen Linear feet of concrete sidewalk were laid during the past week.

The St. John’s Trades and Labor will hold an extraordinary special meeting at Victoria Hall tonight at 8 o’clock.

Mr. Jules Gottehalk has resumed his position with the Department of Rural Reconstruction, on a five month contract.

Zone G of the Auxiliary Fire Service, will be formed tonight at Fort Townshend. This zone is situated in the center of the city.

A Soldier was fined $25.00 for obstructing the Ppolice in the discharge of their duties, at Wednesday’s session of the Magistrate’s Court. The accused was severely reprimanded by His Honor Judge Browne.

In the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, a man was fined $20.00 for a breach of the Game laws. He was accused of jigging salmon in Cape Broyle River. His Honor was caustic in his remarks to the sporting sportsman.

Two vagrants who were taken in for safekeeping, were discharged yesterday.

At Wednesday’s session of the Magistrate’s Court, a motorist was fined $2.00 for driving without a licence.

Two hundred and eight tons of crushed stone were delivered from Signal Hill plant to various works during the past week.

A man given in charge by his wife for being drunk and disorderly in his home, was fined $25.00 or one month in jail, at the Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

A display of handiwork by the children of Bannerman and Victoria Parks attracted much attention in the window of James Baird Ltd., yesterday. A Safety First Motif and miniature swimming pool, tennis court and playground lot, are included in the display.

Yesterday, an English Sailor charged with being drunk and breaking a window, was fined $1.00 for drunkenness and $1.75 compensation. The case caused much amusement in Court as the accused demonstrated how he was only taking shelter from the rain, when he somehow fell through the window.

A postponed case of a motorist arrested for being drunk in charge of a motor vehicle, was further postponed until this afternoon.

August 22 1941 ODDITIES DEER SICKNESS — While pursuing a deer, hunters may become affected with deer sickness, a nausea caused by the pungent musk exuded from the hoofs of the frightened animal.

CRIMSON GOWNS — The wife of Henry II of France, Catherine de Medici, had such a liking for velvet and red, that she made a law forbidding any woman not a Princess, to have a gown wholly of crimson.

60,000 C.O.s — London. With 20 tribunals reviewing their cases 60,000 men in Britain have registered as conscientious objectors, and about 45,000 have been dealt with.

MASS DIPLOMACY – Stockholm. Representing Diplomatic interests of 10 countries, Sweden has become a clearing house of international relations. In this city alone, more than 10,000 cases have so far been handled.

LONG HOME OF POPES — The Vatican has been the home of the Popes since 1377.

CARS IN MILLIONS — There are about 31,000,000 automobiles in the United States.

MORE FINE GOLD — Gold receipts at the Royal Canadian Mint up to June 30, totaled 2,539,879 fine ounces, compared with 2,445,614 in the same 1940 period.

ABOUT CHICAGO — The city of Chicago rests on a rocky foundation, which was built by coral millions of years ago, when the area was a tropical sea.


August 23 1941 R.A.F. OFFICER’S WEDDING Pretty Wedding at Royston Catholic Church

The wedding took place at Royston Catholic Church on Wednesday, (states a recent issue of the Royston Weekly News) of Flight Lieutenant Frederick Green, R.A.F., son of Mr and Mrs. B.C. Green, of St. Andrews, Northgate, Morpeth, Northumberland, and Miss Iris Katherine Marjorie Hayes, daughter of Squadron Leader and Mrs. O’Brien, of “Elwood” Melbourn.

The Church presented a bright and colorful appearance for the occasion, the Sanctuary and High Altar profusely decorated with masses of blue and mauve hydrangea, and carnations of various colors. The lighted candles in their midst added to the beauty of the scene, which was enhanced by the R.A.F. uniform’s of the numbers of the bridegroom’s comrades who were present. The officiating Priest was Squadron Leader A.B. Purdie, R.A.F., who was assisted by acolytes in cassocks of purple.

The bride was given away by her father, and her bridesmaid was Miss Betty Taylor, daughter of Group Captain Taylor, R.A.F., and Mrs. Taylor. The duties of best man were carried out by Pilot Officer W. Kennedy, R.A.F.

During the registration formalities in the Sanctuary, A.C. 2 Francis Wall, (son of Mr and Mrs. Philip Wall of George Street, city) the tenor vocalist, sang “O Promise Me” (B de Koven) and “Just for Today.” (B. F. Seaver) and during the offertory, he sang “Ave Marie” (Gounod) while St. Mary Park Choir sweetly sang the Kyrie Elieson, Sanctus, and Benedictus

The Nuptial Mass concluded with the solemn blessing of the newly married couple, who were then escorted to the Church door by their friends.

This is at least, the third public appearance made by our Newfoundland R.A.F. vocalist, since he went to England, in addition to his contributions over the radio, another program of which will shortly be announced, and with which he will be associated.

August 23 1941 DEATHS FIELD — Passed peacefully away at 12.45 Friday, Marie, wife of the late Philip field, aged 80 years; leaving one son, three daughters, 2 step-daughters, 13 great grandchildren. Funeral will take place on Sunday at 2.30 p.m., from her late residence Torbay Road.
August 23 1941 BIRTHS WHITTEN — At Grace Hospital on August 21st., to Mr. and Mrs. Rod Whitten, a daughter.
August 23 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE The Overland Limited will be leaving St. John’s tomorrow, Sunday, in two sections. All first and second class passengers will leave at 9 p.m. and sleeping car passengers at 9.20.

A motorist was convicted of a breach of the Traffic Act and fined $1.00, in the Magistrate’s Court yesterday. He was accused of parking his car more than 18 inches from the curb, thereby causing interference to traffic.

Haymakers are a bit grouchy these days, we suppose the bad weather accounts for it; certainly these rainy days are not helping them much and the haymaking season is likely to go on indefinitely. — Western Star.

The case of a motorist charged with several breaches of the Traffic Act, was postponed for the Monday morning session of the Magistrate’s Court. The charges include driving with a faulty speedometer, not having a horn and brakes in good condition, and having a faulty tail light.

Two foreign seamen were before Court yesterday. They got into a fight on Water Street, and as a result, one of them had to have stitches inserted in his face, and he was a sorry sight as he appeared before the Court. One man was fined $2.00, and the Judge considered that the other, since he had to be taken to Hospital for treatment, had had punishment enough.


August 25 1941 WEDDING BELLS DEWLING — HISCOCK: The wedding took place at the C. of E. Cathedral on Saturday August 16th, of Violet, daughter of Mr Arthur and the late Leah Hiscock of Trinity, to Orlando, son of the late Mr and Mrs. R. Dewling, Trouty.

The bride, who was given away by her father, looked charming in a long dress of white silk crepe, hat and gloves to match, wearing a corsage of carnations, and maidenhair fern. Her bridesmaids were Miss Melvina Peddle, cousin of the bride, and Miss Hattie Rendell, who wore long dresses of blue and rose respectively, hats and gloves to match, while the groom was attended by Mr. Chesley Puddester.

After the ceremony, a reception was held at the home of Mrs. R.W. Hayter, where a very enjoyable evening was spent. The writer joins with Mr. and Mrs. Dewling in wishing them many happy years of happiness over the seas of matrimony. M. and H.

August 25 1941 OBITUARY Mrs. ANNE CARTER: After an illness of more than a year’s duration, borne with that Christian resignation to the Divine will which characterized her whole life, Mrs. Anne Carter passed to eternal rest at Witless Bay on Saturday, August 23rd.

Born at Witless Bay some 69 years ago, second eldest daughter of the late James and Margaret Gordon, both of whom lived until well beyond the eighty year old mark, deceased was wife of Michael Carter, to who she married some thirty six years ago, and life for them over that long period, despite the ups and downs, was all that one could wish it to be. She was a capable housewife, a kindly neighbor, and ideal life partner. She gave to all, the best she had, and she earned the goodwill of all who knew her.

Deeply religious, it was a source of great consolation and joy to her to have the constant attention of Very Rev. Father Gough, P.P., during her illness and at the hour of her death.

To her husband left alone, is the greatest loss, but he is comforted in the thought that she died peacefully and happily and with the good will of all. Besides her husband. several nieces and nephews are left to mourn.

The largely attended funeral, which took place at Witless Bay on yesterday (Sunday) afternoon, was best evidence of the respect and esteem in which she was held. Services at the Church were conducted by Rev. Father Gouph, and internment was the Parish Cemetery.

August 25 1941 MARRIAGES COADY — MacNEIL: At St. Joseph’s Church on July 10th, 1941, Marie, youngest daughter of Mr and Mrs. John Coady, city, to Neil H., youngest son of Mr and Mrs. Michael MacNeill, Sydney, N.S.

DEWLING — HISCOCK: At the C. of E. Cathedral on August 16th, 1941, Violet, daughter of Arthur and the late Leah Hiscock of Trinity, to Orlindo, son of the late Mr and Mrs. R. Dewling of Trinity.

August 25 1941 DEATHS CARTER — Passed peacefully away at Witless Bay on Saturday, August 23rd 1941, Anne Gordon, aged 69 years, wife of Michael Carter. Leaving husband, several nieces, and nephews to mourn their sad loss. Funeral Sunday , August 24th.—R. I. P.

SHORTALL — Passed peacefully away Sunday afternoon after a long illness, Thomas J., (Cooper) son of the late Thomas and Elizabeth Anne Shortall, leaving to mourn; one brother, John J., of the Nfld Railway. Funeral from his late residence 125 Patrick St. Tuesday at 2.30 p.m. — R.I.P., Sacred heart of Jesus have mercy on his soul.

August 25 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE According to the Fishermen’s Advocate, Harvey & Co’s recent price list states the following: — Flour, price unchanged; Beef, supplies scarce; Port, price up about $1.00 per barrel, local supplies very light; sugar, price quoted, up 15 cents per sack; dried and canned fruit, price advancing.

At the Magistrate’s Court on Saturday morning, His Honor Judge Browne called the attention of the Press to the vast quantities of liquor now being consumed in St. John’s, and the effect of it on the population. The money thus squandered, was needed for war purposes, and so was the cargo space, now being taken to bring it to the Country

The thunder storm last night, was one of the heaviest felt in town for some time, and the heavy lighting is likely to have a blighting effect on many crops.

A Norwegian Seaman, charged with being drunk in a public place, pleaded guilty, and was fined $1.00 in the Magistrate’s Court on Saturday. An English Seaman charged with the same offence, was also fined $1.00.

Freight for the Green Bay service will be accepted at the Railway freight shed tomorrow, Tuesday, from 9 a.m to 5 p.m.

At Saturday morning’s session of the Magistrate’s Court, a laborer from Logy Bay, charged with being drunk while riding a bicycle, pleaded guilty and was fined $5.00.

Children whose fathers are now serving with the Forces overseas, will be entertained at the Caribou Hut on September 2nd, at 3.30 p.m.

Bakeapples, that king of Newfoundland berries, are very scarce this year. Some raspberries have been picked, and the season is drawing near for our staple berries, the partridge berry and the blue berry. It is rumored that prices will be good this year.


August 26 1941 OBITUARY SISTER MARY COLUMBA GLYNN: There occurred yesterday at 2.30 p.m. after a very brief illness, at the Convent of Mercy, Military Road, the death of Sister Mary Columba Glynn. The funeral will take place after Solemn Requiem Mass, which will be celebrated at the Cathedral on Wednesday morning, at 10 o’clock. May the Sacred Heart of Jesus have mercy on her soul.
August 26 1941 WEDDING BELLS MORIARTY — BAIRD: The marriage of Margaret Pauline, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. S. Baird, and Michael Raymond, son of Mr. and Mrs. J.R. Moriarty, took place at 4.00 p.m. on Sunday, August 24th, 1941, at the Presentation Oratory Convent, Cathedral Square, Rt. Rev. Monsg, Kitchin officiating.

The bride, who was given in marriage by her father, wore a long gown of white tulle and valance lace, over Dutchess satin, fashioned on graceful lines, with a shirred bodice and square neckline. Her headdress was of white flowers, which held her shoulder length veil. Her bouquet was of white and pink carnations and Maidenhair Fern. She was attended by her sister, Mrs. Gerard Tobin, who was matron of honor, and who was attired in a gown of dawn pink chiffon, fashioned with a smocked bodice, square neckline, and full skirt, trimmed with pale blue corded ribbon. Her headdress was of pale blue flowers with matching shoulder length veil, and carried a bouquet of white and pink carnations and Maidenhair Fern. The groom was supported by his brother Joseph J. Moriarty, whilst Mr. James Baird capably acted as usher.

The bride’s mother wore a navy blue georgette gown, with blue and white accessories, and the groom’s mother wore Teal blue, with full neckpiece and suitable accessories, and their corsages consisted of Sweet Peas and Boston Fern.

Following the ceremony, a reception was held at the home of the groom’s parents, where the immediate relatives of the families were present and the usual toasts were honored; that to the bride and groom being proposed by Rev. Father P. Burke, and this was responded to by the groom, and also a toast to the bride and groom’s parents, to which the best man, Mr. Joseph Moriarty responded.

The bride’s going away costume consisted of Rose Crepe Dress, over which she wore a Prunella coat and matching accessories.

The honeymoon will be spent at Holyrood and Harbor Grace. Mr and Mrs. M.R. Moriarty will be residing on Topsail Road on their return. Their many friends wish them bon voyage over the matrimonial sea.

August 26 1941 BIRTHS WILDING — COLE: At the Grace Maternity Hospital on August 25th, 1941, to Phillis, wife of Jack Wilding –Cole, a daughter.
August 26 1941 MARRIAGES MORIARTY — BAIRD: At the Presentation Oratory, Presentation Convent, Catherdal Square, on Sunday August 24th, by Rt. Rev. Mons. Kitchin, Margaret Pauline, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. S. Baird, to Michael Raymond, son of Mr. and Mrs. J.R. Moriarty.

PEAKE — GILLIATT: The marriage took place at Brockville, Ont., on the 9th, August, of Jean Ruggles, daughter of Mr and Mrs. J.B. Gilliatt of Wabana, and Lieut. Arthur Holdsworth Peake, son of Lt.-Col and Mrs. Arthur George Peake of Charlottetown, P.E.I. The ceremony was performed by Major the Rev. Charles Kidd in Holy Trinity Church.

August 26 1941 DEATHS WOOD — Eliza M., relict of the late W.O. Wood, aged 96 years. Funeral by motor hearse today, August 26th, at 2.30 p.m. from her late residence, 54 LeMarchant Road. (No flowers by request.)

FRANKLYN — At Satuini, Limuru, Kenya, East Africa, on August 22nd, Sarah, wife of Colonel W.H. Franklyn, D.S.O., and daughter of the late Hon. George and Mrs. Knowling.

August 26 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE Six drunks were fined $1.00 each at the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, and a woman for being drunk and disorderly, was fined $5.00. A man, for being drunk and disorderly was fined $5.00 and another on the same charge was fined $10.00.

BONAVISTA — The trap voyage is over and has not measured up to expectations. This is very disappointing as we know the fish were there. Unfortunately, a continuance of river-like tides frequently made it quite impossible to haul without running grave risks of wrecking the gear. — Fishermen’s Advocate.

The exodus of local workers to other places, is mainly due to the fact that our mines have been on half time since February, and there is apparently no hope of the condition improving. Men are finding it a hard problem to make ends meet on half time, in face of the rising cost of living, and many of them are consequently going to other places where full time work can be found. - The Bell Islander

In Court yesterday, the Assistant Chief of Police commented on the destruction of traffic signs, which is lately becoming prevalent in the city, and said it was time that a stop was put to such conduct. The erection of these signs, entails considerable expenses. They are credited for the protection of the public, and there is a danger of a serous accident occurring if and when signs are torn down.


August 27 1941 OBITUARY THOMAS J SHORTALL: There entered into rest on Sunday last, Thomas J, Shorall, a highly respected resident of the West End. The deceased was the son of the late Thomas and Elizabeth Shortall, who resided on Brien Street during their lifetimes, and were of a good old stock which by industry, did their part in building up this city, and by their work and contributions, helped to erect the Churches and Schools which the present generation have, as memorials to their memory.

Following in the footsteps of his parents, Thomas was an ideal citizen, who by close attention to his avocation —the Coopering Business — gained for himself a place among the independent tradesmen of the city.

He was indeed one of nature’s gentlemen, a truly Christian man. Being of a retiring disposition, the deceased played his part in life unassumingly, manly, and upright, which won for him the respect of all his friends and associates. To his brother John, of the Nfld Railway, we tender deepest sympathy in his bereavement.

August 27 1941 ODDITIES The first free delivery of mail in the United States was in 1863.

Nine rabbits will eat as much as two sheep.

During 1939, Canada produced 25,439,000 pairs of leather footwear.

Occasionally, whales give birth to twins, but a single offspring is the general rule.

Dawn begins when the rising sun is 18 degrees below the horizon.

A lungfish can be kept asleep in a cake of dried mud for several years.

A man is taller when he is lying down that when he is standing.

Cyclones pass through Kansas in a slightly Northwest to Southwest direction; tornados travel from Southwest to Northeast.

Pittsburgh, tenth largest city in the United States, has a population of 665,384, compared to 669,817 10 years ago.

The colossal statue of the “Sleep in Ariadne” in the Vatican, is believed to be the world’s only marble figure with eyelashes.

Girls usually cease to grow between the age of 15 to 16; boys continue to develop for two years or more beyond those ages.

Drop for drop, venom of the coral snake is the most deadly produced by any North American snake.

Compared to 7,630,654 in 1930 there are 7,874,155 people in Illinois today, according to census figures.


August 28 1941 WEDDING BELLS DONOVAN — HARTLEY: A quiet and pretty wedding was celebrated at St. Raphael’s Church, Mount Cashel, on Wedneday morning, when Thomas, eldest son of Mr and Mrs James Donovan, Spencer Street, and Irene, eldest daughter of Mr and Mrs John Hartley, Dunville, P.B., were united in the holy bonds of Matrimony, by the Pastor of the Parish, Rev. Fr. Bride. The Rev. Pastor gave a beautiful and timely discourse on the holy sacrament of matrimony to the young couple, after which he united them in holy wedlock. Following this, Nuptial Mass was celebrated, beseeching God’s blessing on then and their life’s work.

The bridesmaid was Miss Frances Hynes, whilst the duties of best man were ably performed by Mr. Michael Brennan of our local Constabulary Force.

Following the wedding ceremony, the happy couple returned to the home of the groom’s parents, (Mr and Mrs. James Donovan, Spencer St.) where a beautiful wedding breakfast was partaken of. Toasts, speech-making, and all around joviality was the lot of those privileged to be present. After this part of the program was concluded, the newly wedded pair left for Holyrood where the honeymoon was spent.

Many and costly were the presents received, testifying to the esteem in which they are both held by their numerous friends and acquaintances.

The writer joins with their host of friends in extending to them, best wishes for a long and happy journey over the matrimonial sea. L.S.T.

HUNT — GRILLS: On July 30th, at eight o’clock in the evening, a very pretty wedding took place at the Oratory of the Mercy Convent, Military Road, when Bride, daughter of Monica and the late William Grills, was united in matrimony to Patrick J., eldest son of Ellen and the late John Hunt, of Argentia. Rev. Fr. J.J. Hunt, brother of the groom, performed the ceremony.

The bride was given in marriage by her uncle, Mr. John O’Toole, and wore a gown of white moire taffeta with shoulder veil, held by a wreath of orange blossoms. She carried a bouquet of red and white carnations and maidenhair fern. She was attended by her sister Agnes, and Mrs. Joseph Casey, a lifelong friend. Both bridesmaids wore dresses of peach taffeta with hats to match, and carried bouquets of snapdragon and maidenhair fern. The duties of best man were performed by Mr. Paul Kavanagh.

A reception was held at Smithville, where the usual toasts were honored; that to the bride and groom being proposed by Mr. E.J. Neary. The groom responded in a happy manner and also proposed a toast to the bridesmaids, to which Mr. P. Kavanagh responded. The health of the parents of the bride and groom was proposed by Mr. J. Ryan, and was responded to by Rev. Fr. Hunt. After supper, the balance of the evening was taken up with dancing and music, amidst the pleasant atmosphere of Smithville until midnight, when the happy couple departed for Topsail where the honeymoon was spent.

Both the bride and groom are very popular in the city and were the recipients of many useful and valuable gifts, including a very beautiful one from the firm of M.J. O’Brien & Co., Ltd., with whom the bride, before her marriage, held a responsible position, and the groom is the popular Manager of the Company’s store on LeMarchant Road. Their host of friends, wish them bon voyage and good luck.

August 28 1941 MARRIAGES ALCOCK — SEARLE: August 15th, at St. Cyprian’s Church Bell Island, Elvina Butler, daughter of Mr and Mrs. J. W. Searle, Bell Island, to Nicholas, son of Mr and Mrs. Bertram Alcock, Harbor Grace.

DONOVAN — HARTLEY: At St. Raphael’s Church, Mount Cashel, on Wednesday, August 27th, Thomas, eldest son of Mr and Mrs Jas. Donovan, Spencer St., to Irene, eldest daughter of Mr and Mrs. John Hartley, Dunville, P.B.

HUNT — GRILLS: On Wednesday, July 30th, at the Oratory of the Mercy Convent, Military Road, by Rev. father Hunt, Bride, daughter of Monica and the late W.J. Grills, to Patrick J. Hunt, son of Ellen and the late John Hunt, of Argenta.

August 28 1941 DEATHS WOOLRIDGE — On Wednesday, August 27th, after a short illness, John Francis, aged 5 weeks, infant son of Richard and Elizabeth Woolridge.

HUTCHINGS — Passed peacefully away Wednesday evening, after a short illness, Margaret Hutchings, wife of the late Charles Hutchings, leaving to mourn one sister, Mrs. J.L. Oke, Harbor Grace, and a beloved niece, Jessie Bussell. Funeral from her late residence, 119 Bond Street, by motor hearse to Harbor Grace, Friday morning at 8.45.


August 29 1941 WEDDING BELLS BIRD — FIZZARD: At Trinity St. Stephen’s United Church, Thursday evening, August fourteenth, at seven o’clock, a very pretty marriage was solemnized when Miss Thurza Fizzard of Toronto, was united in marriage to Mr. Lew B. Bird of Amherst. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. H.S. Bird of St. John N.B., brother of the groom.

The bride entered the Church to the strains of the wedding march, on the arm of Mr. R.W. Kendall who gave her away. She was charmingly gowned in an ensemble of Queen’s blue crepe with hat to match, and wore a handsome neckpiece of Kolinsky fur. Her corsage was composed of briarcliffe rose and bouvardia.

“The Voice that Breathed O’er Eden” was sung by the Choir and soft music was rendered during the entire service, by Mrs. W.D. Fraser, who presided at the organ. The ushers were Mr. Russell Purdy and Mr. Ellis Goodwin. The Church was prettily decorated for the occasion with garden flowers and foliage, by girl friends of the bride.

Immediately following the ceremony, the happy couple left on an extended wedding trip through the Province, the bride traveling in a beige costume with matching accessories. They will be followed by the best wishes of hosts of friends for much happiness in the future.

Out of town guests were Mr and Mrs. Hubert Fizzard, Shirley and Raymond of Halifax, N.S., Mrs. H.S. Bird and Arthur of St. John N. B., Rev. Leonard and Mrs. Bacon of China, Mrs. Clinton Bacon of Nappan, and Mrs. W.R. Bird and Miss Batty of Halifax. — Amherst Daily News.

August 29 1941 FOGO NOTES OBITUARY, Mrs. PETER MILLER: Fogo, Aug 25th — On Aug. 12th after a long illness, there passed peacefully away Mary, wife of Mr. Peter Miller. Although all medical skill and loving attendance could do, was done, death came as a release from suffering. The late Mrs. Miller leaves to mourn her passing, a husband, one daughter, Gladys, (Mrs. J. Farewell) three sons, Benedict at home, Ronald and Philip in Canada, and several grandchildren, an aged mother, sisters and brothers at Placentia, and a sister in the United States, to whom we extend sympathy .

Interment took place on Friday at 10 a.m. after Requiem High Mass, Rev. Dr. Jones officiating. The flower laden casket was preceded by members of the Altar Society, deceased being for years an officer of that society.

“Death is no foe but every man’s friend ; Death is life’s true beginning, not its end Death is the opener of the Golden Door To that high life which goes from more to more Dear Brother Death, who brings us sweet release From all earth’s sorrows with God’s gift of peace!”.

August 29 1941 WEDDING BELLS LODER — DAWE: St. Andrew’s Church was the scene of a very pretty wedding on August 18th at 6.30 p.m. when Virlie, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Solomon Dawe of Seldom, was united in holy matrimony to Douglas Record, son of Mrs. James Loder of this town, and the late Mr. Record of Gander Bay.

The bride, who was given in marriage by Mr. James Loder, looked charming in a full length gown of white satin, with veil and orange blossoms. She was attended by Miss Julia Loder, stepsister of the groom, who was gowned in floral crepe with hat to match, and Miss Beatrice King, niece of the groom, who wore rose with matching accessories. The groom was ably supported by Mr. George Gavin. The ceremony was performed by Rev. I. Butler, Rector. The groom’s mother was attired in a dress of wine crepe.

Following the ceremony, a reception was held at the home of the groom’s parents. The many valuable and useful presents received testify to the esteem in which the young couple are held.

Mr and Mrs. Record left by motor boat Friday for Gander Bay, where they will in future reside.

“God bless these hands united. God bless these hearts made one; Unsevered and unblighted May they through life go on. Here, in earth’s home preparing For the bright home above. And there for ever sharing Its joy where “God is loved.”

August 29 1941 PERSONAL The following teachers have left to take up duties at their various schools; Miss Edith Ludlow, Channel; Miss Elizabeth Scott, Musgravetown; Mr. Leonard Ludlow, Bell Island; Miss Sadie Ludlow, Bell Island.

Miss Mary Sargent went to St. John’s by S.S. Glencoe to take a course at the Mercy Convent.

Mrs. Farwell, Field Secretary, Adlut Education, who was visiting relatives here, went to the city by S.S. Glencoe.

Misses Ethel and Nora Green who were visiting their mother, have also returned to the city.

Master Peter Noel, who has been visiting relatives here and at Change Islands, has returned to his home in Bell Island.

Miss Douglas Robertson, of St. John’s, who spent a holiday here, has returned home.

Mrs. Fred Earle, last week visited relatives and friends at Change Islands.

Mrs. Rev. Gosse of Kelligrews and her daughter, are at present in town, visiting the former’s brothers, Messrs, Fred and A.L. Earle.

Mr. Harold Earle is at present visiting the capital.

Mr Gordon Downer and wife, of Sydney, C.B. are visiting Mr. Downer’s parents, Mr and Mrs. John Downer.

Mrs. MacDonald, accompanied by her husband, is also visiting her parents, Mr and Mrs John Downer.

Seamen Ray Layman, Harry Earle, and Harvey Wells, paid us a short visit this week. Their coming was a great surprise but we were all glad to see them again, and as they are now en route to their ship, we wish then God-speed and a safe return.

Mr. Guy Stuckless, son of Mr. and Mrs. E. Stuckless, North Side, who is now training with the Royal Air Force in Canada, celebrated his 19th birthday on May 11th. We wish him many happy returns. Guy left here in December, 1940 to join the Air Force, and letters received from him state that he is enjoying life to the full, and looking forward eagerly to the day when he will receive his “Wings”. His father, Mr. E. Stuckless, served in the last World War.

The following celebrated birthdays recently: – Gertrude Earle and Miss Madeline Rendell, August 6th; Miss Elizabeth Scott, August 10th; Georgina Gill, August 17th, Malcolm Green, August 19th; Alma Jones, August 24th.

Mr and Mrs. John Reid, Master Eric Reid, Misses Frances Reid, and Iris Gill, were visitors to Joe Batt’s Arm on Sunday last.

Mrs. George Jones spent a holiday with relatives at Joe Batt’s Arm

Misses Mabel and Grace Layman and Julia Loder spend Sunday at Twillingate. Correspondent.

August 29 1941 DEATHS GILLIVER — On August 27th, 1941, Mabel Gilliver, wife of Spencer Gilliver, in her 51st year. Funeral, August 30th, from her late residence, Apartment 6F, 736 West, 186th Street, New York City.

BRUSELL — Passed peacefully away at Topsail on August 28th (Thursday) at 1 p.m., James K. Brusell, son of the late Captain George and Mrs. Brusell, in his 61st year. Funeral from his late residence, Topsail, on Saturday, at 2.30 p.m.

August 29 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE Further enlistments in the Auxiliary Fire Service will take place at the Police Drill Hall, Fort Townshend, tonight at 8 o’clock.

Passengers for the Labrador Service will leave St. John’s 4 p.m. Saturday, and freight for the same service will be accepted at the dock shed today, Friday from 9 am to noon.

An assault case before the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, was postponed until Saturday, to give the defendant time to call witnesses. The complainant appeared in Court badly battered about the face.

August 29 1941 ODDITIES President Andrew Johnson served less than a full term as President of the United States, serving out only the unexpired term of Abraham Linclon.

Nurses Killed — Three American Nurses were wounded and 271 died, in consequence of disease or accident in the World War; none was killed by enemy fire.


August 30 1941 OBITUARY CAPTAIN GEORGE BISHOP: Succumbing to an illness of but a few months, the late Captain George Bishop, formerly of Wesleyville, Bonavista Bay, passed away at his home, 156 Gower Street, City, on the afternoon of Thursday, August 21st.

The deceased gentleman was born at Swain’s Island, Wesleyville, and was within two days of attaining his 73rd birthday. For 26 years he successfully prosecuted the Labrador fishery and entered the employ of the Fishermen’s Union Trading Company, Port Union, in the year of 1918. Some years later he accepted a contract for Government Mail Service on the North Side of Bonavista Bay, previous to its connection with the Newfoundland Railway, in which he commanded the Coastal Steameship “Watchful” and “Malakoff” on the Bonavista Bay-Trinity Bay route, up to his retirement a few years ago.

He was a man of sterling character, undaunted courage, and of wise council, manifested at all times his willingness to assist any in need, and never lacking in his duty to his Church and Community, for which he gained the respect and love of all, by his Christian influence. No more fitting tribute could be paid him than that supplied by his friend and Pastor, Rev. E. Moore at the funeral Service, who described him in an almost prophetic manner, as frank, manly, warm hearted, endowed with much more than ordinary ability, and actuated at all times by a sincere desire to do his duties to the full extent of his power. His was a life well lived and a course well run.

The death of his three brothers over a brief period, with whom he had been so closely connected, was naturally a major grief to him, and was in no small manner responsible in hastening his death. Besides his sorrowing wife, who with him celebrated their Golden Jubilee on 2nd June last, and who throughout their long years, shared so many joys and sorrows, is comforted with the presence of a family re union, at this saddest hour of her experience.

He leaves to mourn; four sons namely, Naboth of Detroit Mich., Norman of Brooklyn, N.Y., Mason of Morgan’s Printing Co., City, and Ralph of the Nfld. Base Contractors, Fort Pepperrell, the former two sons having traveled from United States to be in attendance at the illness and death of their well beloved father, also three daughters, Mrs. Natham Bungay, Mrs. Charlie Andrews, both of Brooklyn, N.Y., Mrs. J.S. Rowsell, City, as well as three brothers, Edward of Glace Bay, Nova Scotia, John and Jacob of this city, five sisters, Mrs. George Pippy, Glace Bay, N.S., Mrs. Sarah Clifford, Vancouver, Mrs. Wesley Boone, Glace Bay, N.S., Mrs. Benjamin Crewe, Elliston, and Mrs. Joan Hiller, Brookfield, and eight grandchildren.

The funeral Service was held on Friday in Gower Street United Church, and was conducted by Reverends E. Moore, Seeley, and Peters. The funeral arrangements were in charge of Undertaker Barrett, and interment at the New General Protestant Cemetery.

August 30 1941 BIRTHS CROSBIE — At the Grace Hospital Friday, August 29th., to Ella, wife of Percy M. Crosbie, a son.
August 30 1941 MARRIAGE ALCOCK — SEARLE: August 1st., at St. Cyprian’s Church, Bell Island, Elvina Butler, daughter of Mr and Mrs. J. W. Searle, Bell Island, to Nicholas, son, of Mr and Mrs. Bertram Alcock , Harbor Grace.
August 30 1941 DEATHS ROONEY — Passed peacefully away on Friday 29th August, Bertha Stidstone, beloved wife of Alex Rooney. Funeral on Sunday at 3 p.m., from her late residence Chamberlains.

DUGGAN — Passed peacefully away on Friday, 29th. August, at 9 p.m., Margaret Rita, daughter of the late John and Elizabeth Duggan, of Melrose, T.B. Left to mourn; three sisters and one brother. Funeral on Sunday at 2.30 p.m., from the residence of her sister, Mrs. William Howlett, 56 Flowers Hill. R.I.P. – New York papers copy.

August 30 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE It is reported that the Playground association Tag Day yesterday, was very successful, and the amount collected was much in excess of that taken in last year.

In Court yesterday, a case of a breach of the Alcoholic Liquors Act was dismissed, and a motorist charged with passing a red light, received a suspended sentence.

Five ordinary drunks appeared before the Magistrate’s Court yesterday. The case of one man, given in charge by his wife for being drunk and disorderly in his home, will be investigated by the Probation Officer.

St. Bonaventure’s College will begin another scholastic year on Tuesday September 2nd.

Two Seamen were before Court yesterday, charged with desertion. They were remanded until the ship sails.

In the Juvenile Court before Magistrate O’Neil yesterday, two youths were convicted of stealing two boxes of butter from a truck on Campbell Avenue. One of them, who was under bond for a previous larceny, was sentenced to 7 days in prison. The other was fined $5.00 and put under bond to the sum of $25.00.

It appears that the youths got into the truck on Water Street, and when it approached Campbell Avenue, they dumped out the two boxes, and hid them in a field. One of them then secured a bicycle with a parcel carrier, to take away the stolen goods. They were seen by a lady, who reported the matter to the Police, and Constable Clarke of the C.I.D., found them at the rear of a house on LeMarchant Road.

September 2, 1941 OBITUARIES "SISTER MARY COLUMBA GLYNN: The noblest of our young manhood hearken today to the clarion call of duty, and go forth from our shores to fight for right and justice in this death struggle of nations, known as the Second World War. Only the best, the bravest, the fittest, may go. They alone have the endurance, the physical powers and the high-souled courage necessary in such a dread conflict. So too in the never-ending struggle against the powers of evil, in the battle to win souls for Heaven, the dauntless and true flock to Christ’s standard, and thus it was that in 1876, from the noblest and best of Ireland’s womanhood, there came to our shores a recruit for the Army of the King, a postulant armed with the high resolve to devote her young life to the conquest of souls in a Country, to her unknown.

What intrepidity of purpose, what magnanimous courage were required for a young girl of seventeen years — an age when life seems brightest and earth’s pleasures fairest — to turn a deaf ear to the sirens of worldly joys, to sacrifice the comforts of her happy home, and embark in a little sailing vessel, to cross the perilous Atlantic in pursuit of her Ideal — the Catholic training of the children of Newfoundland, the caring for the sick, the comforting of her bereaved.

Sister Mary Columba had the courage and generous spirit of “The Happy Warrior” to fulfill the dream of her youth, and many of our oldest inhabitants can and do bear testimony to her indefatigable labour among all classes of persons, though it was evident her preference was alway for the poor. For many years she went daily from her Convent on Military Road to teach the poor children in St. Bridget’s School, which was at that time situated in Hoylestown. This entailed a toilsome walk back and forth each day, for it was before the era of the auto and tramcar. Many of the parents and grandparents of the children of St. John’s connect her name with the old Peter’s School, Queen Street, where for years she trained the little boys and girls entrusted to her care, later being transferred to St. Vincent de Paul School on Harvey Road when it replaced St. Peters.

Her work was not confined to the City of St. John’s. For a decade of years she ministered to the need of the children and sick in the parishes of Burin and St. Lawrence, where even today, her name is a household word, and stories of her charity and zeal are narrated to the young.

The sick and poor of St. John’s, throughout the years of her active life, had every reason to bless her name, for her visits to them did much to soothe them in their trials, and her consoling words made easy for the dying, the passage from time to eternity. Her saintly presence radiated peace and happiness and her child-like simplicity combined with sound common sense, made her beloved of young and old alike. She knew how to rejoice with the joyful, grieve with the grief-stricken, play with the play-loving children, and even’s god’s irrational creatures came in for their share of her all - embracing charity, for Sister M. Columba feeding the little sparrows, was a familiar figure to all pupils of the Academy of Our Lady of Mercy.

In recent years her duties were necessarily light, her teaching being confined to the religion Classes for the Kindergarten and First Grade. For more than thirty years it was her privilege and holy pleasure to prepare these innocent little children for their First Holy Communion. The greater part of her day she spent in the Convent Chapel in silent converse with her Eucharistic God, so that the sisters were not surprised that it was there she received the stroke of paralysis from which she failed to recover, there too that she received the Last Rites of Holy Mother Church.

And now she has gone to receive the reward promised to those who shall have instructed others unto justice — “They shall shine like stars for all eternity”. She who performed the Works of Mercy so often during life, has heard ere this, “As long as you did it to one of these my least brethren, you did it to Me.”

CAPTAIN SIMPSON: Captain Simpson of Glasgow Scotland, passed away at the Grace Hospital, Saturday morning, August 30th, at 8 o’clock. Rev. Dr. Barr of St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church, visited the deceased, and Brigadier Fagner and her staff were very kind to him. Mrs. Milling, Mrs. R. Bell, Mrs. Cameron, Miss Ruth Calver, and Mr Donald Nicholsom visited him from time to time, as well as Captain and officers who have been in port. The widow and family of the deceased now resides outside of London and several brothers and sisters and other relatives are in Scotland and in the Colonies.

The funeral took place from Carnell’s Mortuary Rooms yesterday afternoon, the Rev. Dr. Barr officiating, assisted by Brigadier Fagner. The funeral arrangements were looked after by Bowring Bros. Ltd., through Mr. Geoffrey Milling. Messages were received yesterday from Mrs. Simpson and family, also letters expressing their heartfelt gratitude for all the kindness extended to the deceased."

September 2, 1941 PROPERTY IS NOW FENCED IN A section of the West End of the city extending from A. E. Hickman’s premises, Westerly to Wyatt Coal and Salt Co. premises, has been fenced along Water Street, this being the area taken over by Department of Defence. Rogerson’s Cove has also been fenced in.
September 2, 1941 PERSONAL "Miss Dia Joyce of the Royal Stores Showroom left by the Overland Limited Sunday night, for Canada.

Mr and Mrs. George Soper are celebrating their 40th wedding anniversary today, having been married at Topsail Methodist Church by Rev. Hayfield, on September 2nd, 1901.

Mr Max Butler, who has been spending a vacation at his home in Bonavista, left for Canada on Sunday to complete his training with the R.C.A.F.

Mr C. Dingwell of Humbermouth, Conductor with the Western Division of the Railway, recently came to the city for an operation which proved successful. Mr. Dingwell is feeling fine and will be able to resume work soon."

September 2, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "An entertainment will be given at the Caribou Hut this afternoon at 3.30 o’clock, for children up to 12 years of age, whose fathers are serving overseas.

Beginning today, the stores will continue open till 6 p.m. daily except Saturday, when they will close at 9.30. During the month of July and August, the stores close at 5 p.m. daily.

Some of the City Schools reopened after the holidays yesterday. Some of the others will reopen today and still others tomorrow. By the end of next week practically all will be back to work.

Two boys were before Court at Bell Island last week, and were charged with breaking into one of the Company’s Mess-houses. They were reprimanded and released on suspended sentence, owing to their tender years. — The Bell Islander.

Farmers in all sections, took advantage of the fine weather yesterday, to catch up on some of their back work in haymaking etc. In former years, all the hay making was done long before this, but this year the weather has delayed the work considerably, though a lot was done yesterday.

The enquiry into the cause of the death of the late Allan Norrie, was concluded at Bell Island last week, before Magistrate Mulcahy. This started before Magistrate Mulcahy and then was transferred to St. John’s, where some evidence was taken before His Honour Judge Browne. It has now concluded before Magistrate Mulcahy. The man, it will be remembered, was killed by falling over a cliff on Bell Island."

September 2, 1941 ODDITIES "Production of passenger cars in Canada has been limited for the current year to 110,126 vehicles.

The fourth United States Census in 1920, showed the Nation with a population of 9,638,453, compared to 7,239,881 in 1880.

Almost one fourth of all the Confederate soldiers killed in the Civil War were from North Carolina."


September 3, 1941 NAVAL CASUALTIES "The Newfoundland Trade Commissioner in London has advised the Director of Recruiting of the following Naval casualties:

CULLIMORE, Ejiah, O.S. JX201709, missing on war service. Next of kin, mother, Mrs. Violet Coles, Elliston, T.B., Newfoundland.

WHELAN, John, O.S. JX230101, missing on war service. Next of kin, mother, Mrs. Edith Whelan, Georgetown, C.B., Newfoundland.

LOCKE, Raymond, O.S. JX230209, missing on war service. Next of kin, mother, Mrs. Patience Locke, Trinity, T.B., Newfoundland."

September 3, 1941 KEEP THE WHEELS TURNING ROUND Chewing Relives Nervous Tension. Workers, whether in office, stores, factories, or munition plants, are seeking in these vital days, to do more work, better work; management is quick to adopt ways and means to help employees keep refreshed while on the job. Recent tests made in some munition plants show that chewing gum while working helps relive fatigue and nervous tension. As a result, many industrial plants provide facilities so that employees may have chewing gum available at all times. Recent tests conducted by Wm. Wrigley Jr. Company Limited, in co-operation with plant management, indicate workers find refreshment by chewing gum while they work, the chewing helps to relive fatigue and nervous strain. To bring this important factor before all employers and work people, Wm. Wrigley Jr. Company Limited is making very extensive and additional use of daily newspapers throughout Canada.
September 3, 1941 NEW VESSEL FOR GRENFELL ASSOCIATION Lunenburg, N.S. Aug 27 — A new vessel for the Grenfell Association, the Nellie A. Cluett, was Christened here yesterday by Mrs. Gibb Sherill, representative of the International Grenfell Association at New York. The trim craft was launched here last May. Commanded by Captain Kenneth Iverson, a veteran of Newfoundland and Labrador waters, she is 145 feet long with a 28 foot beam. Powered by a 450 horsepower engine, the craft developed a speed of 12 knots during recent tests.
September 3, 1941 PERSONAL "Mr. J.B. McEvoy, the well known Lawyer, entered the Grace Hospital last evening for treatment. His many friends will wish him a speedy recovery.

Congratulation are being extended to Miss Margaret O’Flynn of Little Bay, N.D.B. Miss O’Flynn tutored by the Nuns at Corner Brook, not only successful completed a regular nine months Commercial Course in six months, but also secured particularly high marks in recent C.H.E. exams in Commercial Subjects, obtaining distinction in Shorthand, Spelling and Commerce. "

September 3, 1941 NOTE OF THANKS The family of the late Sandy Benson wish to express their sincere thanks to the many friends who helped them in so many ways during his illness, and at the time of his death. Also to those who sent floral tributes, (numbering fifty) numerous telegrams, letters and cards of sympathy, and hope that each and all will accept this expression of heartfelt thanks.
September 3, 1941 MARRIAGES "THISTLE – MILLER: On September 1st at the United Church, Broad Cove, B.D.V., Mildred, daughter of Mrs. R.J. and the late John Thistle, Broad Cove, to Walter P., son of Mr and Mrs. A.W. Miller, Flat Islands, P.B.

FOLEY — Angel: At St. Joseph’s Presbytery on Monday, September 1st. by Very Rev. F.J.D. Ryan, P.P., Gordon, son of Mr and Mrs. Pierce Foley, Quidi Vidi Road, to Helen, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John E. Angel, Hamilton St., this City.

JOHONSTON — LAKE: The wedding took place at Corner Brook on August 27th at Holy Redeemer Church, of Miss Margaret Rita Johnston, daughter of William and the late Sarah Johnston, to Patrick Lake, son of Mr and Mrs S Lake, of Oderin. Rev. Father Cain performed the ceremony and celebrated Nuptial Mass."

September 3, 1941 DEATHS "WILLIAMS — Passed away at St. Clare’s Mercy Hospital at 1.30 yesterday morning, after an operation, Capt. Harvey Williams, in his 51st year; leaving to mourn wife, 4 sisters, 2 brothers. Funeral from his sister’s residence, 120 Casey Street, at 2.30 p.m. Thursday.

SHORTALL — Passed peacefully away Tuesday afternoon, Sept. 2nd., at St. Clare’s Mercy Hospital, John J., son of the late Thomas and Elizabeth Ann Shortall, leaving to mourn their sad loss, wife and two daughters, Geraldine and Elizabeth at home. Funeral tomorrow, Thursday, at 2.30 p.m., from his late residence, 125 Patrick Street. May the Sacred Heart of Jesus have mercy on his soul. (Halifax, Chicago and California papers please copy.)"

September 3, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "Since the last weekly letter was issued, communicable diseases have been reported as follows: — Diphtheria — City 1; Outside 1. Scarlet Fever — City 1; Outside nil. Observation — City, 2; Outside, nil. Measles — City 3; Outside nil. H M MOSDELL, M.D. Secretary Public Health & Welfare.

A Canadian Soldier was before the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, and was charged with stealing a motor car from the Railway Electrical Shop, driving the car whilst in a state of intoxication, and driving without a licence. A Constable stated that he saw the car being driven forty or fifty feet, then collided with a fence. When arrested, the accused was asleep at the wheel. The Soldier stated that he remembered getting drunk, but after this his mind was a blank. The case was not concluded.

An important meeting of the Newfoundland Dairymen’s Association will be held in the Brookfield School tomorrow night at nine o’clock. Business of the utmost importance is to be transacted.

On Saturday night, Mr. George Lawrence of the Department of Natural Resources, was at Corner Brook, and gave a showing of the Royal Visit Films, as well as one showing the departure of the members of the Royal Artillery on May 12th., 1940. The show was under the auspices of the W.P.A. at Corner Brook.

A Seaman was before the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, and was charged with breaking a mirror valued at $80.00 at the Imperial Café. Two Chinese giving evidence, stated they saw the accused throw a sugar bowl at the mirror. The accused claimed he had not thrown the bowl but another had done so. The hearing was postponed.

Mr. George Hickman, Grand Falls Academy Principal, spent his summer vacation period attending Acadia University, where he was successful in securing his M.A. degree. This summer course is the fourth Mr. Hickman has taken in connection with his degree, and these courses culminated with the writing of a very brilliant thesis on, “The history of Education in Newfoundland”. — Grand Falls Advertiser.

Two Canadian Soldiers were before His Honour Judge Browne Tuesday, charged with being drunk and assaulting Mrs. Joseph, Shopkeeper, New Gower St. The lady stated that the accused came to her store after midnight Sunday, and demanded cigarettes. When she tried to keep them out, one of them hit her in the eye and blackened it. The case will be continued.

The A.N.D. Co., has recently converted the dwelling house on Hill Road, Grand Falls, lately occupied by W. Krake, into a Hostel for the Teachers at Grand Falls Academy. The interior of the house has been completely renovated, and the top flat has been made over into modern bedrooms. The Hostel accommodates eight Teachers and will be presided over by Mr. Kennedy of Botwood."


September 4, 1941 VOLUNTEERS FOR THE ROYAL NAVY "The following Naval Volunteers have arrived at St. John’s for interview and final medical examination :—

BELL ISLAND DISTRICT: Snow, Ronald Joseph. George, Kenneth Garfield. Rees, Walter Louis. Hunt, Reginald Clyde. Byrne, Gerald Augustine. Bartlett, William Bernard. Tucker, George St. Clair.

BONAVISTA DISTRICT: Lodge, William Lloyal; Mason, Reginal Alvin; Frampton, Augrey; Wiseman, Nathaniel Lemuel; Webster, Noah Joshua; Fitzgerald, Alphonsus Patrick.

BURGEO DISTRICT: Mauger, Freeman John.

CARBONEAR DISTRICT: Chislett, Percy Ellwood; Branton, George Norman; Bishop, Eli Maxwell; Jackson, Anthony George; Jackson, Hubert Angus; Pike, George Robert.

CLARENVILLE DISTRICT: Blundon, Alfred Rendell; Seward, Ronald Bowring; Harvey, Martin; Halliday, Abel Gilbert; Vardy, Clarence; Napier Grant.

CORNER BROOK DISTRICT: White, Harold Joseph; White, Stephen Joseph; James, Karl John; Benoit, Adolph; O’Quinn, Vincent; Macauly, Alexander Freeman; Hann, Winston Bramwell; Wight, Milton Piercy; Boyd, Augustus Wilson George; Sparks, Ambrose Morgan; Anderson, William George; Stride, Garland; Foley, Martin; Connors, Fergus Benedict; Holloway, Harold Gilbert; Gillam, John Albo; Bennett, Leo; Lavis, Joseph.

GRAND FALLS DISTRICT: Stringer, Levi; Barfitt, Hector Garfield; Bignell, George; Webb, Kelvin; Pelley, Malcolm Joseph Edwin; Janes, Harold Mark; Granter, Robert James; Goulding, Clement John; Bartlett, Hardy Ford; Wall, Malcolm Taylor; Brown, Matthew Thomas; Green, Howard John; Hiscock, Sylvester; Furlong, George; Colbourne, Hubert Edgar.

GREENSPOND DISTRICT: Wicks, Gordon Harold; Churchill, Henry George.

HARBOR BRETON DISTRICT: Blagdon, Hubert; Harris, Arthur.

HOLYROOD DISTRICT: Miles, James Theodore; Mercer, William Robert; Penney, Thomas; Smith, Ronald.

La SCIE DISTRICT:Norris, Bernard; Phillpott, Francis Patrick; Bryan, Martin Patrick; Bryan, Andrew Patrick; Downey, Patrick Joseph; Regular, Herman Gilbert; Travers, Aloysius Joseph; Hurley, Patrick Aloysius; Barrett, Stephen; Banks, Alfred Francis.

MARYSTOWN DISTRICT: Farewell, Norman Edgar; Hodder, Raymond Kenneth; Hefferman, James.

PLACENTIA DISTRICT: Best, Chesley; Hapgood, Robert Benjamin; Nash, Aloysius Michael.

St. GEORGE DISTRICT: Cornect, Gerald Joseph; Hulen, James; White, Hugh; Bennett, John Thomas; Noseworthy, John; Samma, Maxwell.

TWILLINGATE DISTRICT: Nippard, Archbald; Brown, Willis Lionel; Hewitt, Archibald; Russell, Llewellyn George; Cull, Norman; Hodder, William David; Wells, Walter Cyril; Normore, Walter Frank; Lilly, Gerald Harvey."

September 4, 1941 OBITUARY "MARGARET O’KEEFE: The passing into the “Great unknown” on Saturday, August 30th last, of Margaret, widow of the late Phillip O’Keefe, was learned with surprise and sadness by her many friends and neighbours.

Born in St. John’s, the eldest daughter of the late Joseph Adams, Mrs. O’Keefe, though in her 66th year, was ever young and of the most happy disposition. She was fond of the country, the seaside, and her home, and but a few sort weeks ago, enjoyed a holiday at one of our delightful villages by the sea with friends who now mourn her passing, and extend to her bereaved family their deep sympathy. Truly “In midst of life we are in Death.”

One cannot think of Mrs. O’Keefe without thinking of “Mark Twain” for like him, she was humourous and simple in her ways of life. Somewhere too in his short essays, Mark Twain tells of an incident in pure and gripping prose, and call it “The Chronology of God”. It is an incident related to him by a fellow traveller when someone had challenged the ways of Providence. In it, the traveller had glimpsed for a moment the timing of Eternity, in the fleeting process of life and achievement What is the banner that signals life where death seems to encompass? It is but a fragment, a bit of wisdom from the Great Teacher; a poet’s winged words; the memory of a mother’s love; something from the riches of religious literature. The sunlight catches it. The watching eye sees it. The unbroken spirit flies to catch the light. Margaret O’Keefe has lived her life — a moment between two Eternities, influenced by that which has been, and to influence that which is to come – and like Mark Twain’s traveller, her influence was good. No sorrow shall distress her nights. No strife disturb her days. The pillow of Heavenly Peace has kissed her cheek.

To her son Bernard, her daughter Ellen, and her son-in-law, Mr. Chesley Noseworthy, with whom her last happy years were made still more happy, and from whose residence the funeral took place on Monday, Sept. 1st., we extended our heartfelt sympathy in their irreparable loss.

Ethel and Jim.

Mrs. JAMES HEFFERMAN: The death occurred at New London, Conn., on August 14th., of Elizabeth Hannah Hefferson, of 79 Bayonet St., New London, and formerly of Grand Falls, Nfld.

The deceased is the mother of Raymond C. Hefferman, 220 72 nd. St., Brooklyn, N.Y., a member of the Newfoundland War Veterans Association of N.Y. She is survived also by two others sons, Nathan of Boston, Mass; Lawrence B., of Waterford, Conn., two daughters, Mrs. Gertrude Derry and Mrs. Violet Young of New London, Conn., and three granddaughters, and two grandsons.

The late Mrs. Hefferman made her home in New London 17 years ago, coming from Halifax, N.S. Funeral service was held at Cedar Grove Cemetery, New London, on Saturday August 16th., at 2.30 p.m.

The pallbearers were: Raymond C. Hefferman, Nathan J. Hefferman, Lawrence B. Hefferman, Herbert Derry, Robert Adams and Jean Hulzer. — Nfld. Weekly."

September 4, 1941 DEATHS "DIACK — Passed away at 1.20 a.m. Thursday, George Diack, son of the late George and Margaret Diack of Kamery, Scotland, leaving to mourn wife, 3 daughters, Mrs. Margaret Baker, Mrs. Eva Morgan, of Brooklyn, New York, and Annie at home, also 1 sister and 1 brother at Scotland and one sister at South Africa. Funeral on Saturday at 2.30 p.m., from his late residence, 6 Coronation St.

GREELY — Passed away at Foxtrap, Greelytown, on Wednesday afternoon Sept. 3rd., Mary Jane Greely in her 79th year, leaving to mourn three sons, Edward, George, and Matthew, one daughter Mrs. Eliu Butler, two brothers, George, and Thomas Petten of Kelligrews, one sister, Mrs. Joseph Yetmen, New York, sixteen grandchildren and one great grandchild. Funeral on Friday from her home at Greelytown, to All Saints’ Church at Foxtrap."

September 4, 1941 PERSONAL "Mr and Mrs H. Guy and their four children, recently arrived in the city from Fortune, leaving for Carbonear yesterday afternoon, where Mr. Guy will resume his duties as Principal of the U.C. High School there.

Miss Sybil Gillingham of Safe Hr. is spending a vacation in the city.

Mr. H. Granter recently arrived in the city on a business trip.

Mr. Frank Brown, who has been working in St. John’s for several months, returned to his home at Brownsdale, T.B. on Tuesday.

Mr. T.W. Abbott of Musgrave Hr., N.D.B., is spending several days in the city on business.

Seaman Gunner Gerald Bindon, youngest son of Mrs. and the late William Bindon, arrived home Monday night to spend a short leave."

September 4, 1941 EXPRESS LEAVES 3 HOURS LATER Owing to strong winds approaching gale force, a steamer did not arrive at Port aux Basques yesterday on schedule, being some hours late. The railway lines on the West Coast were down and no passenger list was received. Owing to the late arrival at Port aux Basques, passengers will not leave by the express tonight until 8.20 p.m. instead of 6.20 p.m., and all first and second class passengers will not leave until 8 p.m. instead of 6 p.m.
September 4, 1941 PACK OF DOGS IS CAUSING TROUBLE Residents of that part of the City between Freshwater Road and the Old Railway Track, and particularly of Mayor Avenue, have been annoyed for some time by a pack of 12 to 15 dogs that roam that neighbourhood by night, and doing considerable damage. Within the past week or so, a man was attacked and had his trousers torn, and one woman at least, was very badly frightened, when one dog of a pack tore her clothes. It is stated that some of these dogs are licenced.
September 4, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "Two motor car drivers were fined $1.50 each yesterday for having defective brakes on their cars. Another was fined $2.00 for the same offence. They were before Judge Browne at the Magistrate’s Court.

Three residents of Avondale, brothers, were arrested yesterday morning on a charge of assaulting Sergeant Pitcher of the Nfld. Constabulary, on Saturday last. They appeared before Court and were remanded on bail.

A Canadian Soldier was before Judge Browne at the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, and was charged with being drunk and disorderly in the home of Isaac Hull. He was fined $25.00 or one month.

The two Canadian Soldiers who were charged with being drunk and disorderly and assaulting Mr. J. Joseph, on Tuesday, were again up yesterday. Both were fined $20.00 for being drunk and disorderly, and one who was convicted of the assault, was fined $10.00. Before the trial started yesterday, the husband of Mrs. Joseph who was in Court, hit the man accused of the assault three or four times before the Police could interfere. He was charged with assault and was fined $15.00 and ordered to sign bonds in the sum of $100.00.

In the Juvenile Court yesterday, a youth was charged with breaking and entering the store of J Caul, Duggan St., and stealing groceries to the value of $20.00. Yesterday morning about six o’clock, Constables Bren Martin and Bartlett, doing duty on new Gower St., saw two youths with brin bags, in which there were some contents. When the boys saw the Police they dropped the bags and ran. A man name Boyle also saw the bags dropped and saw the direction in which the boys ran. The Constables gave chase and arrested the boys in the basement of a house. When the Police arrived, there were four or five boys, all known to the Police circles there, either asleep or pretending to be. The case did not conclude yesterday."


September 5, 1941 MARRIAGES "WYLIE — TAIT: On Wednesday September 3rd by the Rev. J.E. Bell B.A., Mary Elinore, daughter of the late Dr. J.S. Tait and Mrs. Tait, to Frederick George, son of Mr W.T. Wylie and Mrs. Wylie.

The marriage will take place at Woodstock on Wednesday Sept. 10th of Helen daughter of Mr. and Mrs Ernest White to Douglas son of Mr and Mrs. E.J. Wornell.

Mr and Mrs. Peter Fitzgerald, Bell Island, announce the engagement of their daughter Patricia, to Leonard, son of Mr. and Mrs J A Hughes, Wabana. The marriage to take place on September 8th."

September 5, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "A preliminary enquiry into the charge against three Sailors and a Soldier, charged with taking and running ashore, a schooner at Cape Broyle, started yesterday afternoon before His Honour Judge Browne, at the Magistrate’s Court. Several witness were examined.

The Port aux Basques Correspondent of the Western Star, states that an nasty accident occurred last Saturday at the new Church of England School building, when a scaffold with four men fell. Three of the men escaped with a severe shaking up but Clifford Osmond of Lakes Brook received more serious injuries. This is the first building accident to occur there this Summer, despite all the building activities.

Two motor truck drivers were before the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, charged with driving after dark with only one light. They gave an explanation under oath and no fines were imposed.

The bark burning plant which was recently installed at Corner Brook mill is giving good results. Last week, over a million pounds of steam had been produced in one day’s operation of the bark burning and boiler heating process. – Western Star.

The driver of a station wagon was before Court yesterday, charged with exceeding the speed limit whilst going around a curve West of Mount Pearl Road. He pleaded not guilty. A Traffic Officer stated that the man was travelling at between 40 and 50 miles per hour. The accused and a witness, denied the charge, stating that between St. John’s and Kelligrews the speed was never more than 22 miles per hour. The charges were dismissed.

Three Canadian Soldiers were before Court yesterday, charged with being drunk ad disorderly, and assaulting and obstructing the Police in the discharge of their duty. The Guard at the Police Station gave evidence of the men, after being taken to the lock up, objecting to being searched, — and one of them kicked him and tore his uniform. The men were arrested on New Gower St., near Belmont Café, by Constables Carter and Morrissey. The Proprietor of the place stated that windows valued at $13.50 were broken. All three were fined $5.00 each for being drunk and disorderly. The man who obstructed the Police and assaulted the Guard was fined $30.00, and the Solder who assaulted Constable Carter was fined $10.00 and ordered to pay half the cost of the glass. The third was fined $20.00 for obstructing the Police and $6.75 as compensation for the glass."


September 6, 1941 OBITUARY "JULIA ANN GOSSE: Spaniard’s Bay. On Friday, August 29th., there passed peacefully away to a more celestial clime, the soul of Julia Ann Gosse, at the age of 79 years, after a long and painful illness. Of a very quite and pleasing personality, it is no exaggeration to say that she was well liked by her many friends and acquaintances, and that she had no enemies, and in her passing much sorrow was felt by her many friends.

Her funeral took place on Sunday, the 31st, and was largely attended, many coming from nearby settlements to pay their last tribute to her whom they all respected and esteemed. Her casket was profusely covered with floral tributes, testifying to the respect and esteem in which she was held by her many friends.

The Rev. J.L. Reynolds, M.A., of the United Church of Bay Roberts, officiated at the service both at Church and Cemetery. At the Church he delivered a most eloquent and soul inspiring address, taking as his text, Psalm 116, V-9 : “I Will walk before the Lord in the land of the living, “ which must have greatly impressed those present. The following hymns were sung: at the home, “How bright those glorious spirits shine”; at the Church Mrs. David Dawe presided at the organ, and the hymns, “Jesus the very though of Thee” and “Abide with me” were sung. After the committal service at the cemetery, all that was mortal of a fond and loving wife and mother was gently laid to rest in God’s Acre until that day.

She leaves to mourn their sad loss one son, Ebenezer at Spaniard’s Bay; one adopted son, Lincoln, at Spaniard’s Bay; four daughters, Beatrice, and Elsie at New York, Effie at Boston, and Bertha at Montreal; her aged husband at home. Also one brother, Mark Yetman, at Bryant’s Cove, to all of whom much sympathy is extended.

Now the Labourer’s task is o’er, Now the battle day is past, Now upon the farther shore."

September 6, 1941 WEDDING BELLS "HANLEY — McGUIRE: A very pretty wedding was solemnized Thursday, Sept. 4th at the Oratory of the Sacred Heart Convent of Mercy, with Nuptial Mass celebrated by Rev. R.T. McGrath, when Elizabeth Ann (Betty), daughter of N.B. and the late Laura McGuire, was united in matrimony to Gerard Richard, son of Margaret and the late Jas. Hanley. The bride was attended by her sister, Margaret and the groom was ably supported by the bride’s brother, Bernard. After the ceremony, breakfast was served at Woodstock, after which the bride and groom left by the evening’s express for “Lake of the Woods”, where their honeymoon will be spent.

NEARY — KAVANAGH

St James Church was the scene of a very pretty wedding on Saturday morning Aug. 9th., when Patrick, son of Mr. T.F. Neary, was united in the bonds of matrimony to Agnes, daughter of Mr. Thomas Kavanagh, the ceremony being performed at Nuptial Mass solemnized by Rev. G.F. Bartlett at 10 a.m.

The bride was charmingly attired in white satin with lace trimmings, and carried a bouquet of pink and white carnations. She was attended by the groom’s sister, Miss Mary Neary, who wore pink taffeta with veil and pink coronet. She also carried a bouquet of carnations. The groom was supported by Mr. William Kavanagh, brother of the bride, as best man. During the ceremony the Ave Maria was sung by Miss Mary Hughes with Misses Eleanor Lawlor and Mary Petrie at the organ.

A wedding breakfast was held after the ceremony, at the home of Mr and Mrs. T.F. Neary, where the event was happily celebrated. Only the immediate relatives and friends were present. The happy couple left on the 3 p.m. boat, to spend their honeymoon on the mainland. The bride’s going away suit was a grey costume with pink accessories.

Mr. and Mrs. Neary have taken up residence at their new home on Portugal Cove Road. The groom has a position at the American Base here in St. John’s. We wish Mr. and Mrs. Neary many years of wedded happiness. — The Bell Islander."

September 6, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "Fresh codfish was practically unobtainable in the local markets yesterday, and householders visiting the coves had to return home without their regular Friday’s supper. Weather conditions were unfit for fishermen to get on the grounds.

The Twillingate Sun states that first arrivals from the fishery were, “Speed Queen” and “White & Sons”. They had 800 and 1200 qtls respectively. The “Speed Queen” crew put 200 ashore at Croc, to be taken upon the second trip.

Announcement was made in the R.C. Churches last Sunday, that in accordance with the wishes of His Majesty the King, His Grace the Archbishop, had directed special services of intercession to be held in all the Churches tomorrow Sunday.

Four Seamen were before Judge Browne at the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, charged with being absent from their ship without leave. Two of them agreed to go on board, and were ordered to sign bonds that they will do so. The other two were sent to the Penitentiary till the ship is ready to sail.

A reception was held at the Mercer’s Cove School last week, in honour of William Mercer, a Naval Recruit who will be proceeding overseas in the near future. Mr. W.E. Mercer made a presentation of a sum of money which was collected at the door. Tea was served by the ladies of Mercer’s Cove and vicinity, and a very enjoyable time was spent by all. Bay Roberts Guardian .

Last week the Entertainment Committee, with the co-operation of the W.P.A., held a social evening in the Court House in honour of Airman Neil Harnett, who was home on a short visit from Canada. The program was in charge of Rev. T.J. Pitt, Vice-Chairman of the committee, who gave an address of welcome. Other speakers were, Adjutant Wright, His Lordship Bishop Abraham, and Rev. J. Goodland. Musical items interspersed with Mr. Frank Anstey playing. Choice refreshments were provided by the W.P.A. Following this, a small money gift was presented by Rev. Goodland, on behalf of the N.P.A. Mrs. Wood also presented a sum of money from members of her committee. — Twillingate Sun. "


September 8, 1941 WEDDING BELLS "WINSOR — GRANDY: A very pretty wedding took place on Saturday, September 6th., at St. Thomas’ Church, city, when Elizabeth, daughter of Mr and Mrs. Thomas B. Grandy of Garnish, became the bride of Caleb, son of Mr and Mrs. Arthur Winsor of Wesleyville, the ceremony being performed at 8.30 p.m. by Rev. Canon Meaden.

The bride looked charming in a pale rose dress with a corsage of pink and white rosebuds and asparagus fern. She was attended by the groom’s sister, Miss Mildred Winsor. The groom was supported by Mr. Wallace Stratton as best man.

After the ceremony the wedding party motored to the Crosbie Hotel where the event was enjoyably celebrated.

Mrs. Grandy , mother of the bride, was present at the wedding, and will return to her home at Garnish in a few days.

Constable Roy Grandy, brother of the bride, returned to Heart’s Content immediately after the wedding.

Mr and Mrs. Winsor will take up residence at St. John’s. We wish the happy couple many years of wedded bliss."

September 8, 1941 ENGAGEMENT The Rev. Canon and Mrs. Howitt announce the engagement of their daughter, Margaret Ruth, to Mr. Charles William Fullerton, son of Mrs. Fullerton and the late Judge Fullerton. The wedding will take place early in October.
September 8, 1941 MARRIAGE WINSOR – GRANDY – On September 6th at St. Thomas’s Church , City, Elizabeth, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas B. Gransdy, Garnish , to Caleb, son of Mr and Mrs. Winsor, Wesleyville.
September 8, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "Many people were in the country berry picking yesterday, but they found the weather cold and conditions not favourable. Berries were found to be scarce and only fairly good baskets were secured.

A man who was before Court on Saturday charged with stealing a bag of coal from the Newfoundland Railway Yard, pleaded guilty. He stated he had taken some on previous ocassions. He was fined $10.00 or 30 days.

The lighted and whistling buoy from the brandies shoals outside Catalina Harbor, broke loose from its moorings and subsequently was towed into Catalina by Captain William Norman. — Fishermen’s Advocate.

The Great Eastern Oil Co. have announced that the 1941 motor car register published by them, is now ready for distribution and may be obtained at several of the city gas stations.

A truckman was fined $1.00 at the Magistrate’s Court on Saturday, for parking his truck in one of the areas prohibited.

A number of cases against American Soldiers which had been pending for some time, were heard before His honour Judge Browne on Saturday. All were for breaches of the Traffic Act and fines from $1.00 to $4.50 were imposed in six cases heard. Some others will be heard on Thursday and on Saturday of this week.

A man who was before Court on Saturday charged with being drunk, and having in his possession two packages of Lucky Strike cigarettes on which there were no Customs Revenue stamp, was fined $6.00. He stated the cigarettes were given to him by a Sailor friend.

The store in the Tobin Building which was formerly occupied as a retail sales store for the Board of Liquor Control, and was vacated when the store at the corner of Water and Holloway St. was taken over, has again been secured and will be used in addition to the one now in use. It is now being put in readiness.

A motorist who was charged with driving at a rate of thirty miles per hour on LeMarchant Road, was fined $3.00 at the Magistrate’s Court on Saturday. Another who was convicted of driving at a speed of 45 miles per hour on the Topsail Road was fined $3.00 .

Two sailors were before Court on Saturday, and were convicted of being drunk and disorderly in a Hostel. The evidence was that they broke up a number of bottles and glasses and destroyed two chairs. They were fined $10.00 each for being drunk and disorderly, and $3.00 for compensation for the damage. One of the accused, who was in possession of a flask of whisky on which there was no controllers’ label, was fined $10.00 for that offence.

The Catalina correspondent of the Fishermen’s Advocate states, “Bad weather which vexed us more than usual this year, continues into September, and an almost continual downpour of rain, with fog between showers has halted many activities. Some grass remains uncut and much that is mown at the present time remains unmade and is spoiling. Fishermen find it difficult to make their fish, and it is feared a low quality will result.” "

September 8, 1941 ODDITIES "DITCHLING, England — Sir Frank Brangwyn, well known artist, is a member of the “Defenders of Ditchling” committee, to oppose a development scheme which the committee says will spoil the character of this Sussex village.

Uruguay ranks next To Russia in Government control of business."


September 10, 1941 OBITUARY "RICHARD HIBBS: After a very brief illness, Richard Hibbs, formerly Minister of Public Works, entered into rest yesterday afternoon in his 65th year, at his residence at Kelligrews, and the news of his passing was heard with deep regret all over Newfoundland. The deceased was born son of the late Thomas and Susannah (Walsh) Hibbs at Riverdale, Kelligrews, on October 15th, 1876, and was educated at the public school, Kelligrews.

In his early life he farmed the family land at Kelligrews. In 1915 he was a Reporter on the staff of the Evening Advocate, and a member of the Fishermen/s Protective Union. When the Morning Advocate appeared the following year, he was Editor of that paper, and was Business Manager of the Union Publishing Company from 1916 to 1924. From 1924 to 1926 he was President and Managing Director of the Daily Globe Publishing Company.

As a member of the party of Sir Richard Squires, and on the F.P.U. platform, he was elected to represent the district of Fogo in 1919, and from that date to 1924, he was Deputy Speaker and Chairman of Committees in the House of Assembly. He was elected to represent the District of Trinity in 1923, and in the following year, after the dissolution of the House, was elected to Fogo District and re elected in 1928, taking the portfolio of Public Works.

The deceased was Editor of the Hansard from 1919 to 1924, Compiler and Editor “Newfoundland Road Booster"", annually from 1921 - 24.” “Newfoundland for pleasure” in 1924 - 5, “Who’s Who in and from Newfoundland” in 1927 and 1930.

His work as Minister of Public Works was notable, especially in connection with a good road program, and he was an executive member of the Canadian Good Roads Association.

His wife, nee Selina Anthony of Kelligrews, predeceased him three months ago. He leaves to mourn two sons and six daughters. The funeral takes place tomorrow Thursday, at 3 p.m. interment ay Hopewell Cemetery."

September 10, 1941 WEDDING NOTICE HOVER – KNIGHT: At Brooklyn, New York, on August 31st., Ethel Grace, daughter of Mr and Mrs A. H. Knight, to Donald H. Hover, of Gayer, Penn.
September 10, 1941 BIRTHS STEPHENS — At the Grace Hospital on September 9th, to Mr and Mrs. W.G. Stephens, a son.
September 10, 1941 DEATHS "HIBBS — Richard at Kelligrews, at 4.40 p.m. Tuesday, September 9th, aged 65 years. Funeral on Thursday, September 11th, at 3 p.m. to Hopewell Cemetery.

MORRISSEY — Passed away after a long illness, Mary, aged 84 years, wife of the late P.S. Morrissey (Tailor) and daughter of late Captain William and Mary Smart of Harbor Grace, leaving to mourn, two sons and two daughters, Peter of the British Imports Co., and John at Gloucester, Mass., Mrs Edward Cantwell, Torbay, and Mrs. F. Leonard of the city; also one brother, and one sister residing in the U.S.A.. Funeral on tomorrow Thursday, from her late residence, 47 Parade Street. R.I.P.

SIMMS — Passed peacefully away on September 8th, Frederick Simms, son of H.J. and Barbara Simms, leaving to mourn, wife, one child, father, mother and six brothers, William of the Newfoundland Clothing Co., Walter, Henry, Francis, Edward, and Philip serving overseas. Funeral at 2.30 p.m. today Wednesday, from his father’s residence, 7 New Gower Street.

PINE — Passed peacefully away yesterday morning, Capt. James J Pine, aged 78 years. He leaves to mourn three daughters and two sons. Funeral on tomorrow, Thursday, September 11th at 2.30 p.m., from his daughter’s residence, 105 Springdale Street."


September 11, 1941 BIRTH TUCKER — At St. Clare’s Mercy Hospital on September 10th, to James R and Mollie (Newhook) Tucker, 70 Golf Ave., a son.
September 11, 1941 MARRIAGE "BURSEY – NICOL: At St. Thomas’s Church, on Sept. 8th, by Rev. J.T. Rhodes, B.A., Leah, daughter of Mrs. and the late Harry Nicol, to Lewis, son of the late Mr and Mrs Uriah Bursey, both of this city.

TETFORD – LeDREW: The wedding took place at Laurenceton, on August 27th., of Mildred M., daughter of Winnie and the late William Tetford, to Leslie LeDrew, both of Laurencetown. The ceremony was performed by Rev. D. Brushett. The groom is a member of the Nfld. Ranger Force, and after spending their honeymoon, will proceed to Englee where he is now stationed. – Twillingate Sun."

September 11, 1941 DEATHS "MOYST — Passed away suddenly Wednesday evening, Joseph Moyst, aged 58 years, leaving to mourn wife, two sons, Cyril in H.M. Navy, Alton in Mercantile Navy; 3 sisters, Mrs. John Clarke, City, Mrs. Cole, Boston, U.S.A., and Mrs. Harry Janes, Boston, U.S.A.; 2 brothers, Herbert, H.M. Customs, Thomas, 2nd Engineer S.S. Caribou. Funeral 2.30 Friday, from his late residence, 4 Hayward Avenue. American papers please copy.

CLARKE — Suddenly at St. John’s on Saturday, August 30th, William George Clarke, aged 64, leaving to mourn his widow, his daughter Janie, at home, and his step-daughter Mrs. William Mugford of Clarke’s Beach, and also his brother, Charles, of Montreal."

September 11, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "Some codfish was offered for sale in the local markets yesterday and ready purchases were found. No large catches were made by the fishermen.

This is the regular meeting day of the city Council, but the hour for meeting may be changed or the meeting cancelled till tomorrow, in view of the ceremonies which take place.

Weather for the holiday yesterday, was miserable again, and many who made plans for the afternoon had to cancel them.

The Special Parade of the C.L.B. for the purpose of participating in the Review for the Duke of Kent, will now be held at 1.25 p.m. today, instead of at 8.45 a.m. as previously announced.

The W.P.A. at Bay Roberts, sent to headquarters last week, 50 pairs socks, one pair mitts, 30 pairs gloves, 12 sweaters, 2 scarves. Mrs. James White won the tassels donated by Mrs Cameron.

The Bay Roberts Guardian states that William T. Snow of Bay Roberts East, now serving with the Royal Artillery, received head injuries some time ago, and was sent to the Royal Sussex Hospital for treatment. He is now well again and able to go back to his Regiment.

Summer months end as at September 21st., but all who have subscribed to the notion that a swallow does not bring summer are true this year. In fact, people generally have not reported such birds. It is no diversion from the truth to say that it has been a poor season so far. Despite a significant desire for holidays, the weather has not granted much, although many visitors have come or are going shortly with others, already back to home life. — Twillingate Sun."


September 12, 1941 DEATHS "TILLEY — Passed peacefully away September 11th., Mary Maher, aged 67 years, beloved wife of George Tilley; leaving to mourn husband, 3 sons, 2 daughters, 5 sisters and a large circle of friends. Funeral on Sunday at 2.30 p.m. from Upper Battery Road. (Montreal and U.S. papers please copy)

CONDON — Passed peacefully away on Thursday night after a tedious illness, Mary, dearly beloved daughter of William and Margaret Condon; leaving to mourn, her sorrowing parents and five sisters. Funeral on Sunday at 2.30 p.m. from her late residence 20 Bond Street. May she rest in peace.

STEPHENSON — Entered into rest Thursday, Sept. 11th., Elsie Aydon, beloved wife of John H. Stephenson; left to mourn are husband, one son overseas, and one daughter. Funeral on Saturday at 2.30 p.m. by motor hearse from her late residence, 32 Leslie Street."

September 12, 1941 ANNOUNCEMENT Mrs. Ettie Adams of Milton, announces the engagement of her daughter Marjorie, to Sgnm, R.E. Homes, Royal Canadian Corps of Signals of Sault. Ste. Marie, Ontario. Marriage to take place in the near future.
September 12, 1941 NOTE OF THANKS Mr. John A. Butt and family of Carbonear, wish to thank all those who helped in any way during the illness and death of a dear wife and mother, also those who sent flowers, messages, letters or cards of sympathy, after her death.
September 12, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "Repairs are now being made to the brickwork of the Eastern wall of the Museum Building.

Great progress has been made in demolishing buildings on Water Street West and now a whole section has been completed from Watt’s Office to Tessier’s Bldg. Daily, many visit the site to see the speedy manner in which very old buildings are being knocked down.

The City Council have placed a light on the King’s Beach, over the steps West on the National War Memorial. That was a very dark spot and many suffered accidents in falling over the steps. The light is a noted improvement and is appreciated by all who had occasion to pass up and down there.

A meeting of the Shop and Office Employees will be held at Victoria Hall on Monday night. At this meeting a report will be made of the progress made by the negotiating committee on the amendment to the wage scale. Other business of major importance will also be discussed.

At several places along New Gower Street now, barrels mark off the places where manhole tops have been broken in the past few days. These will remain till tops can be procured. The barrels are causing some traffic congestion. Last night a car collided with some which are located near the junction of Holdsworth Street.

The voters list for the forthcoming Municipal election is now being taken in the city, and all sections are being covered.

A Construction Foreman who hails from New York, was before the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, charged with being under the influence of liquor whilst in charge of a car, with taking a motor car belonging to Isaac Levitz without the permission of the owner, and driving with out a licence. The first charge was dismissed and on the other two he was fined $20.00.

A visitor to the office of the “Times” recently was Mr. Clarence Bishop, son of Mr and Mrs Jas. Bishop, Power Street, St. John’s. He was spending a few days in New York as the guest of his cousin, Mrs. Elias Noseworthy. For the past two years Mr. Bishop has been engaged in wireless work on British Mercantile ships, and is now Chief Wireless Operator on a British ship engaged in war work. Mr. Bishop has had some interesting and dangerous experiences in the pursuit of his calling, since outbreak of the war. – Newfoundland Times.

A visitor to the office of the Newfoundland Times was Capt. G.C.P. Menzies of the Royal Navy. Capt. Menzies is interested in securing new or used reading matter, cards, games, gramophone records, or other material of that kind, for the use of the Navy lads operating in Newfoundland waters and elsewhere. The request was relayed to the Nfld. War Veterans Association at New York, and at their recent meeting, they agreed to sponsor, in conjunction with the “Times”, the collection and supplements of articles of the kind for the purpose outline. — Newfoundland Times.

The two new draggers built for Capt. John Murley of William St. Fairhaven, formerly of Marystown, and William Elridge, also of Fairhaven, have sailed on their first trips to the fishing ground. The “Eldridge” is Captained by Thomas Keeping of New Bedford, and formerly of Marystown, part owner of the “Whaling City” which was sold to the Government some time ago. Captain Meade, part owner and Captain of the “John G. Murley”, also sold his other boat to the Government. A new dragger is being built for Capt. Mike Smith, former owner of the “Noreen”, which was purchased by the Government. — Newfoundland Times."


September 14, 1941 BIRTHS TUCKER — At the Grace Hospital on Wednesday, September 10th., to Elsie, wife of Mr Best Tucker, a son. Mother and baby doing well.
September 14, 1941 MARRIAGE WORNELL – WHITE: At Woodstock on September 10th, by Rev. A.F. Binnington, Helen, daughter of Mr and Mrs. Ernest White, to Douglas, son of Mr and Mrs. E.J. Wornell, both of this city.
September 14, 1941 DEATHS "RENDELL — Rebecca Rendell, wife of the late James Rendell, aged 71. Funeral notice later.

FLYNN — At Marystown, on Sept 9th., James, son of the late M.T. Flynn, aged 51 years; leaving one brother and four sisters."

September 14, 1941 WAR 25 YEARS AGO TODAY "September 13, 1916 — French continued advance on Somme front, capturing Bouchavenes.Bois de L’abbe and a trench system, South of Le Priez farm. Dimitrakopoulos became Prime Minister of Greece

September 14, 1916 — Russian air raid on German Hydroplane Station on Gulf of Riga, destroyed several machines. British advanced on Vandar Valley on Salonika front; Serbians advanced on Monastir."

September 14, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "Members of the Constabulary are now covering the city taking the annual list of Jurors.

A man who was before Court yesterday, charged with assaulting a Taximan on Craigmiller Avenue last Saturday night, was convicted and fined $10.00.

Twelve men were before the Court yesterday morning, charged with drunkenness, and fines of one or two dollars were imposed.

A special meeting of Terra Nova Council 1452 Knights of Columbus, will be held at Columbus Club tomorrow, after last Mass.

The quarterly meeting of the St. John’s T.A. & B. Society, will be held tomorrow afternoon at 2.15 o’clock, at the Hall.

A Naval Rating and a resident of the city was before Court yesterday, charged with fighting on the public street, and they were fined $5.00 each.

The meeting of the city Council was again postponed yesterday afternoon, because of the visit of the Duke of Kent. It will now be held at 10.30 this morning.

A Naval Rating was before Judge Browne at the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, changed with assaulting and tearing the overcoat of a Taxi Driver on Thursday night. He was fined $25 or 30 days and was ordered to pay $5 compensation for the damage done.

A Taximan charged with speeding on Topsail Road, and passing traffic at a speed greater than 25 miles per hour, was fined $25.00 by His Honour, Judge Browne. A Traffic Officer stated the accused was going between 60 and 70 m.p.h. at Flanagian’s Nap Curve, and he could smell the tires of the car burning."


September 17, 1941 OBITUARY "ROBERT WILLIAMS: Last evening at his home, 37 Parade Street, Robert Williams, for nearly fifty years in the service of the Horwood Lumber Co., and Manager of the Carpenter Shop Department, passed to his rest. After serving his apprenticeship, he worked for some time in Montreal, Canada, and then returned to St. John’s.

The late Robert Williams was ill for about a month, and had reached the alloted span of life. He was a quiet, gentlemanly man, cautious and faithful to his firm, and all duties entrusted to him for nearly half a century by the Horwood Lumber Co. He was a devout member of the Church of England, being a member of St. Thomas’s Church.

His daughters, Mrs. Alice Smith and Miss Irene Williams, arrived from Boston, Mass., a short time ago, with Mrs. Smith’s two children, Robert and Barbara, to see him. Miss Irene Williams and Miss Barbara Smith, with her brother Robert, left for their home in Boston by the last express.

The late Robert Williams married Miss Annie Gribble, who with their three daughters, Mrs. Alice Smith, Mrs. Victor Reid, and Miss Irene Williams, survive. Mr. Edmund Williams, (Carpenter) of Matapan, Mass., and Mr. Arthur G. Williams, Empire Avenue, formerly of Harvey Brehm Ltd., are brothers.

The funeral takes place on Wednesday afternoon at 2.30 p.m. from his home 37 Parade Street. The late Robert Williams dies universally regretted. — Q."

September 17, 1941 MARRIAGES "KENNEDY – NEVILLE: On Sept. 1st., at St. Patrick’s Convent, with Nuptial Mass celebrated by Rev. J.D. Savin, Nance Neville to Terence Kennedy, both of this city.

STERLING – TOTTERDELL: On Sept. 15th at All Saints Cathedral, Halifax, N.S., by the Rev. Dean Whalley, Marjory Totterdell of Lancashire, England, to Second Lieutenant A. Bruce Stirling, R.C.A. of this city."

September 17, 1941 DEATHS "BOYLES — Passed peacefully away on Monday at 10 p.m., Rev. A.H. Boyles of Topsail; leaving to mourn, wife, one son, father, brother and two sisters. Funeral will take place from the residence of Blanche Joyce, 7 Franklyn Avenue, Wednesday at 3 p.m.

BUSH — Passed peacefully away yesterday morning, at St. Clare’s Mercy Hospital after a brief illness, Mary Kavanagh, wife of William Bush, leaving to mourn, husband, one daughter, Helen; three brothers, John, Lawrence and Frederick, and one sister Maud, (Mrs. Peter Kelly). Funeral on Wednesday at 2.30 p.m., from her late residence, 90 Hamilton Street. (Sydney, Montreal and Boston papers please copy.) R.I.P.

WALSH — Passed peacefully away yesterday morning, Elizabeth Walsh, aged 54 years. Funeral on Wednesday at 2 p.m. from her uncle’s residence, Patrick Walsh, Topsail Road. Interment at Topsail.

WILLIAMS — Entered into rest after a short illness, Robert Williams, aged 73 years; leaving wife, (nee Annie Bribble), three daughters, Mrs Alice Smith, and Miss Irene of Boston, and Mrs. Victor Reid (Bessie) of this City; also one sister, two brothers and two grandchildren. Funeral at 2.30 p.m. Wednesday, from his late residence, 39 Parade St. No flowers by request.

URQUHART — Passed away suddenly in London, England, Thursday, September 11th, James B. Urquhart. He is survived by his wife and daughter."

September 17, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "The Bell Islander stated that it is announced by Rev. G.F. Bartlett, Administrator, that the new R.C. Parish Hall at Wabana will be completed about the end of September, and will be officially opened by His Grace the Archbishop. The date of His Grace’s visit will be announced later.

It has been announced that a new Hospital will open next year to replace the present surgery, which has long since outlived it usefulness. This is welcome news to the employees and the public generally. — The Bell Islander.

Two Canadian Soldiers were before Court at Grand Falls last week. One was charged with disorderly conduct on the public street, and the second with obstructing the Police in the discharge of their duty, and also with having in his possession a quantity of liquor bearing a defaced label. The first was fined $2.00. The second was fined $10.00. It appears that one of the Soldiers raised objection to his companion being arrested, and attempted to give a demonstration of his fistic ability against the Police. Constable McCarthy proved to be more than equal to the occasion, and after a brief skuffle, the Soldier found himself cooling behind the bars. — Grand Fall Advertiser.

A motorist was before the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, charged with driving without a licence, and was fined $1.00. On being convicted of driving at 50 m.p.h. on a curve on the Topsail Road, he was fined $20.00. The accused stated he had a licence from the State of New York but had failed to take out a Newfoundland licence.

Wednesday evening, a hawk swooped down and seized one of Mr. V.P. Martin's pigeons, bearing it to the ground in Miles Lane. Unable to lift the heavy, kicking pigeon, the hawk set about to kill it on the ground. However the raider was discovered, and Mr. Martin's son, Harrison, came with a shot gun, and neatly cut the head off Mr. Hawk with a discharged shot, without injuring the pigeon, which calmly got up and strutted away. — Fishermen’s Advocate.

In the height of the storm late Tuesday afternoon, a fire occurred in the Bakery of Mr. Edward Parsons at the rear of the Hotel on the Green. An overheated stovepipe running from the oven to the chimney, set fire to the wood work in the vicinity. The Firemen responded promptly when the Company’s whistle sounded, and as there was a good supply of water available, they had no difficulty in extinguishing the fire with the hose. There was considerable smoke and excitement for a while, but the fire was fortunately discovered before it could gain any headway. — The Bell Islander."


September 18, 1941 BOY IS DROWNED IN THE HARBOR "Frank Martin of Cabot Street Falls Over Wharf of A.H. Murray & Co.

Frank Martin, aged 13 years, grandson of Mr. Azariah Martin, of 13 Cabot Street, was accidentally drowned on Tuesday afternoon, when he fell over the wharf of A.H. Murray & Co. The body was recovered about 8 p.m. and taken to the morgue, where later in the night, it was taken in charge by Undertaker Barrett, and conveyed to his home.

Tuesday afternoon, Mr. Azariah Martin reported to the Police, that at 2.30 p.m. he came in a motor boat to the West side of the East wharf of A.H. Murray & Co., and having in the motor boat, his son Francis and his grandson Frank. The deceased got up on the wharf, and shortly afterwards they saw his cap floating from the wharf. It was presumed that the lad had fallen overboard. Search was made and the body was recovered about 8 p.m., when it was conveyed to Baird’s Wharf, placed in the Police van, and taken to the morgue."

September 18, 1941 OBITUARY "NINA BRAGG: GLACE BAY, Sept 10th — Stricken ill two days ago with a heart ailment, Miss Nina Bragg of Channel, Newfoundland, died at General Hospital this morning, two hours after she had been admitted for treatment. A native of Newfoundland, she had arrived in Glace Bay several days ago, to visit Mr and Mrs. Robert Ferguson, Bay Street.

She is survived by her mother, Mrs. Winnie Bragg, Channel, Nfld., and one brother Norman, at Corner Brook. The body, reposing at Lowden’s Funeral Home here, will be forwarded to Newfoundland for burial.

JOSEPH MURPHY: We regret to announce the death of Joseph, son of M.P. Murphy (Manager of Bowden & Co. Ltd.) who passed away Tuesday evening at 7 o’clock, after a brief illness. Joie as he was affectionately called, graduated from St. Bon’s College in 1939. Possessed of rare artistic instinct for painting and sketching, his work was dearly recognized as of a very high quality, and had Divine Providence spared him, there is no doubt that he would have attained fame at the work which he loved so dearly.

Possessed of a gentle nature, he was the idol of all who had the pleasure of his company, and his passing will be mourned by many of his classmates and friends. He leaves to mourn his passing, father, mother, four brothers and three sisters. The funeral takes place this afternoon from his late residence, 72 Prescott Street, at 2.45 p.m."

September 18, 1941 OBSEQUIES LATE ROBERT WILLIAMS "One of the largest funerals seen for some time, took place yesterday afternoon, when the late Mr. Robert Williams of the Horwood Lumber Co. was laid to rest in the Church of England Cemetery. The deceased was for nearly fifty years in that firm’s employ, and the business was closed for the funeral out of respect for their old employee. Messrs Cyril and George Horwood, Directors, and a large number of employees were present, as also was a guard of honour from “Emmie Lodge”, Sons of England.

The service at St. Thomas’s was conducted by Rev. J.T. Rhodes, who also officiated at the grave side. To his widow (nee Miss Gribble), his brother, Edmund, his daughters, Mrs. Alice Smith and Miss Irene Williams, Boston, and his sister, Mrs. L.J. White (St. John’s), and daughter, Mrs. Victor Reid, and brother, Mr. Arthur G. Williams, of St. John’s, his friends extend their sincere sympathy."

September 18, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "Flour prices are unchanged and there is no special news about spring wheat, but Ontario wheat is exceptionally high, and pastry wheat flour has advanced another 20 cents. Ontario has had a long dry hot Summer in contrast with the Maritimes, and the wheat crop there is not up to average. — Newfoundland Review.

On Tuesday morning at the R.C. Cathedral, Mass of the Holy Ghost was celebrated by Rt. Rev. Monsigor Kitchin, and the children of the various Schools in the parish were in attendance. Monsignor Kitchin addressed the pupils.

Two Naval men were before Court on Tuesday, charged with stealing traffic lights. They pleaded not guilty. The lights were found in the possession of the accused at an East End Tavern. They were valued at $4.87 each, and were damaged when recovered. The men denied taking the lanterns, and stated that when they arrived at the Tavern, they were under the table there. The hearing was adjourned until this morning.

The opening assembly of the Memorial University College will be held this afternoon at 4.30 o’clock.

The weekly meeting of the City Council will be held this afternoon, and will start at 2.50 instead of at three o’clock as usual.

The weekly Newfoundland broadcast over the BB(British Broadcasting) was heard last night, and was enjoyed. Many messages to home folks were heard from boys in the Royal Artillery and Royal Navy.

A Naval man was before His Honour, Judge Browne, at the Magistrate’s Court on Tuesday, charged with breaking Glass in a Golden Arrow bus. The evidence was that he made some insulting remarks to a lady passenger, and when she paid no attention to him, he smashed a pane of glass. He was fined $10.00 for disorderly conduct, and $7.00 compensation for the glass.

A great deal of concern is being felt by the Nova Scotia trade, regarding future supplies of brushes. It is very difficult to obtain bristles, now that supplies from China have been cut off, and although some substitutes from newly developed plastics have been tried for this purpose, production in large quantities is not yet underway.

The new Church of England Academy on Bell Island, was officially opened last week when a card party and dance were held in the building. An immense crowd of people took advantage of the occasion to visit the new School and inspect it. The social event was one of the most successful ever held on the island in point of attendance. — The Bell Islander.

Tea prices in the last two sales on the Calcutta market, showed declines, and the market is easier. On August 5th., common tea dropped 1.2d and better grades 1d, while a week later, a decline of the same amount was recorded. Buyers believe that the price will go still lower in future sales. It is reported that few steamships will be available before the end of September, but should sailings then become more frequent as it is now anticipated, tea will be available in ample quantities. It is estimated that there are 57,000,000 pounds of tea available for out-markets, over and above last years output. It is unreasonable to believe that with so many Countries shut off all together from purchasing tea, this quantity will be required."

September 18, 1941 ODDITIES "It takes 499 seconds for the light of the sun to reach us, when it is as far distant of 92,000,000 miles.

Unwary Whale — A cable repair ship pulled up a broken cable off the Coast of Newfoundland in 1931, and found a whale on it. The cable had pierced the whales mouth, and was completely looped around the body.

Frank Chance, of the famous ""Tinker-to-Evers-to-Chance"" infield of the Chicago Cubs, died at Los Angeles 16 years ago today. He managed the Cubs from 1906 to 1912, was succeeded by Johnny Evers, who stayed one year. Joe Tinker was the Manager in 1916.

The pug dog originated in China."


September 19, 1941 OBITUARY "Rev. ARTHUR BOYLE: Rev. Arthur H. Boyle passed peacefully away at 10 o’clock Monday night September 15th., at his residence in Topsail. Funeral took place on Wednesday at 3 o’clock, from the home of Mrs. Joyce, on 7 Franklyn Avenue, St. John’s. The service was held in the home by Rev. A.F. Binnington, M.A. At George Street Church, Mr. Binnington also conducted the service, while Rev. Dr. Curtis led in prayer and Rev. W.B. Perry, B.A., gave a brief address. Miss Jean Taylor rendered most beautifully, “Face to Face.”

Mr. Boyle, though cut off in the prime of life at 46 years of age, rendered a very fine service to the United Church, and the people whom he served in Newfoundland. He was a faithful, conscientious, sincere, and devoted Minister of the Gospel. He was never robust and in later years carried on his work under the great handicap of ill-health. He bore his sickness with fortitude and courage and as long as he had strength, even against advise of his friends, kept up his work with efficiency and marked ability. He was a lover of youth, and for many years directed the work of the Teachers’ Training Course, among the youth of the Newfoundland Conference. This work was well done and good results will be seen down through the years.

A little over a year ago, he was forced to retire, and to relinquish the work which lay so near his heart. He knew he was facing the end, but there was no fear and no cloud of doubt crossed his soul. He resigned himself to the will of God and waited for the hour of departure. He died so easily as though he just fell asleep in the Everlasting Arms.

He leaves a wife and child, father, mother, and two sisters, to all of whom we extend our deepest sympathy. His wife and child will have our special prayers as they face life alone. May God sustain them. COM."

September 19, 1941 WEDDING BELLS "JONES – HALEY: A very quite and pretty wedding was solemnized at the Church of St. John the Evangelist, Topsail, Wednesday afternoon, September 10th., when Anne Enid Louis, daughter of William J and the late Caroline Haley, became the bride of Llewellyn Ernest Jones, son of Mrs Jean and the late Ernest Jones. The ceremony was performed by Rev. W.A. Butler.

The bride was attended by Mrs. John Harding, sister of the groom, and Mrs. Cyril Butler, sister of the bride. The groom was supported by his brother, Trevor, and John Noel. The wedding march was played by Mr. Bob Macleod.

After the ceremony, a reception was held at the home of the bride’s parents, where the usual toasts were duly honoured. The couple received many presents testifying to the esteem in which they were held.

The writer joins with their many friends in wishing the young couple many years of happiness. — M.F.C."

September 19, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "The Friday members of the Red Cross are asked to meet at Calvert House, 65 Rennie’s Mill Road, today, as the usual work room at the Pitts Memorial Hall is not available today.

A motorist who was before Judge Brown at the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, charged with going around Davey’s Curve on Topsail Road at a speed of forty miles per hour, was fined $4.00.

Passengers for St. Pierre-South Coast-Halifax service will leave St. John’s at ten o’clock tomorrow morning. This will be the final connection for St. Pierre this season.

A Steward of one of the local ships, was before Court yesterday, charged with being drunk and disorderly on an expess train, and being in possession of two packages of cigarettes on which there was no Customs Stamp. The accused stated he had been arrested for nothing. He was ordered detained without bail, until the Conductor who gave him in charge can give evidence.

The Codroy Valley Correspondent of the Western Star, states when the Apostolic Delegate passed through there on his way to St. John’s, many people assembled at the station, St. Andrew’s, Tompkins, and Doyle’s, to receive his blessing. At Doyle’s, two little girls, Rita Martin and Marina McIsaac presented bouquets of flowers, and received in return medals, which they prize dearly."

September 19, 1941 BORN SPURRELL — Born Sept. 16th at St. Clare’s Hospital, a son to Mr. and Mrs. J.G. Spurrell.
September 19, 1941 THE REAL REASON An Oslo girl, sitting in the lounge of a Hotel, was approached by a German Officer asking her to dance. She refused, and shortly afterward, he returned and spoke in rather a threatening tone. “Is it because I am German?” he inquired. “Oh, no” she said, smiling sweetly, “Not at all! It is merely because I am a Norwegian.”

September 20, 1941 NEWFOUNDLANDER BURIED IN ENGLAND "Further Details of the Death and Burial of Sgt. Frank Smith, R.A.F., of Brigus:

At the opening of the Memorial University College on Thursday, a tense, emotion-charged silence filled the Assembly Hall when the President, in a tone of reverence and fond remembrance, read the Honour Roll of Old Memorials who have paid the supreme sacrifice in the war against Nazi Germany. One of the names on the list was that of Sergt. Frank Smith, R.A.F., son of Mr. Michael and the late Mrs. Smith, of Brigus.

Sergt. Smith joined the Royal Air Force in England in 1938, before the outbreak of war. During his period of active service, he had a splendid record, taking part in “pamphlet raids” and making in all, a grand total of thirty five flights over Germany, besides his activities in connection with other Countries.

In October, 1940, Sergt. Smith entered the R.A.F. Hospital at Gosford, suffering from spinal trouble. After a gallant fight against the grimmest foe of all, the young Airman took his final flight, free from war and pain, on July 22, 1941. He was buried with full service honours at Churchyard in Donnington, Albrighton.

The bereaved father has received several comforting letters from officials in England, assuring him that everything humanly possible was done for Sergt Smith during his illness. Following is an extract from a letter written on July 30th by the Wing Commander, commanding R.A.F. Station Cosford: —

“Sergeant Smith was under the care of the Hospital of this Station since October 1940, during which time he received the personal attention of the Senior Medical Oofficer and Officer Commanding the Hospital.

“I can assure you that complete arrangements were made respecting the funeral, which took place with full service honours, and although it was not possible for myself to be in attendance, I was represented by an Officer of this Station, a Newfoundlander himself. The body was taken to the Roman Catholic Church on the Station, and as is customary, remained overnight. A Requiem Mass was said prior to interment, the Mass being attended by a number of personnel of this Station.”

Later, Mr. Smith received a most sympathetic, comforting letter, from Group Captain C. O’Neill, dated August 3rd, and which is reproduced below in its entirety:

R.A.F. Hospital, Cosford. 3rd August, 1941.

Dear Sir, – I am writing to you to give you some details regarding the death and last illness of your son, Sergt. F.J. Smith, and to express to you on my own behalf, and that of the Hospital Staff, our heartfelt sympathy in your bereavement.

As I told you in my last letter, he had been steadily going down hill for a long time. I am afraid there was no hope for him. I feel sure however, you will be comforted to know that he was surrounded by all possible care and attention, and that everything humanly possible was done for him. He was most popular with all the Staff, so that looking after him and attending to his wants and comfort, was genuinely a pleasure for the Sisters and Staff. I may add that they were genuinely distressed when he died.

He was an excellent patient right through his illness. He never complained right up to the end. He had a philosophical outlook and disposition, and a quiet sense of humour, which were particularly endearing to everyone.

Though his illness was a long one, it was not uncomfortable, and he had no pain or distress. He was frequently attended by the Roman Catholic Chaplain, and had the Sacraments frequently, so that you may feel particularly happy on that score. His death was most peaceful.

He was buried with full service honours at the Chuchyard in Donnington, Albrighton. The funeral was particularly nice and impressive. There was a wreath from Admiral Silver, who had taken great interest in him, and who had visited him with his wife a number of occasions in the Hospital. I also had two wreaths sent from the Hospital, one being marked, “In loving memory from alll his relatives and friends in Newfoundland”, and the other from the Hospital Staff.

The position of the grave is being notified to the War Graves’ Commission, who will make provision for a head-stone at the conclusion of the war. In the mean time, a temporary cross will be provided. Arrangements have been made for regular care and attention to be given to the grave, and for flowers to be placed there at regular intervals.

Please again accept our most profound sympathy in your great loss.

I remain, Yours truly, C. O’NEILL. Group Capt. Commanding R.A.F. Hospital, Cosford.

And, finally, an extract from a letter written to Mr. Smith by the Assistant Trade Commissioner for Newfoundland, dated Aug. 6, 1941: —

“I would like to express my deep condolences in your great loss, as well as the sympathy of all members of the staff of this office. Your son was well known to us all in the office, from his many visits when on leave. He was very well liked, and we were all most distressed to hear of his tragic death.”

Mr. Smith deeply appreciates the kindness which prompted the writers of these letters, in the mist of exacting duties and the peril of German raids, to try to bring a ray of cheer to a grief-stricken father in the far-away Island of Newfoundland."

September 20, 1941 WEDDING BELLS "FRANCIS — KEAY: A small but pretty Military wedding took place in Corpus Christi Church at Kilbride, Wednesday morning, at 8.30, Rt. Rev. Mgr. Rawlins officiating, when Eunice, daughter of Mr and Mrs. Alonzo Keay of Lourdes, N.S., and Gnr. W. Francis, son of Mr and Mrs. W. Francis, of Plymouth, N.S., a member of a Canadian Artillery Unit stationed here, were united in marriage, in the presence of friends and members of the unit.

The bride entered the Church on the arm of Major E.D. Walsh, accompanied by Miss Mary Smyth, the bridesmaid, and wore a tailored costume of beige gabardine with brown accessories, and carried a corsage of tailsman roses. The bridesmaid wore brown with a corsage of carnations. The groom in service dress, was attended by Gnr. J.F. Wilkinson. After the wedding ceremony the bridal party attended Mass.

The following evening, a reception was held at the home of Mrs. S. Densmore, Kilbride. The bride intends to remain in Newfoundland for a few weeks, before returning to their home in Lourdes, Pictou County, Nova Scotia."

September 20, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "During the past week, sixty two men, and twenty two horses, were working at the Sanitary Department. A total of 555 loads of ashes and garbage were carted to the various dumps.

The Magisterial Enquiry into the fire and the death of the late John Furlong, was continued before Magistrate O’Neill yesterday afternoon. Assistant Chief of Police Strange was conducting the enquiry..

Two labourers who appeared before Court yesterday with breaking a pane of glass in the store of Mrs. Clinton, George St., and stealing chocolate bars, etc., were remanded without bail. They were arrested early yesterday morning.

The Western Star states that word has been received that Mr. W.A. King, who has been Collector of Customs at Corner Brook since shortly after the opening of the mill, has been promoted to another position in the Department of Customs at St. John’s, and leaves for the new post at the end of September.

District Inspector Walsh and Constable Boyle of Corner Brook, have arrived here in charge of two prisoners — Hedley Jackson and Harold Mercer, who were charged with stealing jewellery to the value of $1,884.00, from the store of Simon Tuma at that place. They have been remanded to the Penitentiary pending investigation into another charge of burglary.

A Canadian Soldier was before His Honour, Judge Browne, at the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, charged with disorderly conduct, and he was fined $10.00 or 14 days. He was arrested at an early hour yesterday morning, at the rear of a residence on Sudbury St. The evidence was that he had been hanging around for several nights, and it was thought that he was trying to enter the house.

A resident of Scott St. was before the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, charged with dangerous driving on the afternoon of September 1st. He pleaded not guilty. Some evidence was taken, but the case did not conclude. He was the driver of the car which capsized on Rennie’s Hill, and from which one of the occupants were seriously injured.

Dunphy Ltd., are making an extension to their wharf, which will provide them with more than four thousand square feet of additional wharf space. One section has been extended fifty or sixty feet, and the head will extend 83 feet across, with a depth of twenty feet of water at low tide, and is so laid out as to make easy docking of ships. Nearly one thousand piles will be used in construction. — Western Star.

One of Bowaters dinky engines has been running ballast from Brake’s Point ballast pit to the new siding at West side, for several nights recently. Night shifts for the steam shovel and engine have become necessary owing to the main line being extra busy in the day time with other traffic. The siding should be finished in another week. It will be a great convenience in the handling of pulpwood coming over the railway for the Company. — Western Star."


September 22, 1941 MARRIAGE RALPH — HOWSE: On Wednesday, September 17th, at the C of E Cathedral, The Right Rev. The Lord Bishop of Newfoundland officiating, Miss Emma Frances Howse, daughter of Mr and Mrs. Avalon Howse of Glovertown, to Rev, Wilfred Frances Ralph, Incumbent of White Bay.
September 22, 1941 DEATHS RICE — On September 21st., Helen Margaret, aged thirteen months, darling child of Leo and Nellie Rice, 75 Harvey Road.
September 22, 1941 WEDDING BELLS "RALPH – HOWSE: A very pretty wedding took place at the Church of England, September 17th., when Miss Emma Frances Howse, daughter of Mr and Mrs Avalon Howse of Glovertown, was married to the Rev. Wilfred Francis Ralph, Incumbent of White Bay. The ceremony was performed by the Right Rev. The Lord Bishop of Newfoundland, and the Holy Communion was celebrated by the Rev. Canon Higham, Rector of the Cathedral.

The bride was attended by her sister, Miss Mildred Howse, and was given away by her father. The Rev. F.H. Buffett, Chaplain of Queen’s College, was best man. Mr. E. Marett presided at the organ.

The bride’s dress was of white Duchess satin, and shoulder veil with orange blossoms attached. She carried a bouquet of pink and white carnations with lilies and maidenhair fern. The bridesmaid wore a dress of peach taffeta with shoulder veil to match, and carried a bouquet of sweet peas, pink carnations and maidenhair fern.

The wedding breakfast at the Crosbie Hotel was attended by a number of relatives and friends. The health of the bride and groom was proposed by the Bishop and responded to by the groom. The health of the bridesmaids was proposed by Mr. Buffett.

The newly-married couple left by Thursday’s Express for Glovertown, where they will spend a few days before proceeding to Flat Islands, the home of the groom. The bride’s going away attire was Royal Blue chiffon velvet dress with sequin trimmings, and a pale blue coat with navy hat and accessories .

They take with them the good wishes of all their friends for a long and happy married life."

September 22, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "Two motorist charged with exceeding the speed limited in the city, were fined $2.50 each, at the Magistrate’s Court on Saturday. Another was fined $3.00 for the same offence.

Quite a few passengers availed of the final Summer Sunday Special yesterday, for points as far as Placentia. The weather was fine and the day was enjoyed to the full.

Mr. Fred Dalton’s Shop in Catalina was broken into last week. The shop was closed at 9.15 p.m. and the culprit broke a window and made off with some loot, between then and the following morning. Constable Hickman Rose made an investigation. — Fishermen’s Advocate.

The work of demolishing the former West End Stores has been completed in short time, and very little remains now but a pile of old brick. The former G.M. Barr’s Building is being taken down, as well as that on the Western corner of the Cove, latterly used by James G. Crawford.

Frost last week affected the crops in some sections near St. John’s. Blue berries were also bitten.

A motorist from Argentia was before the Magistrate’s Court on Saturday, charged with exceeding the speed limited on a highroad. He was fined $4.00 .

Passengers for regular point on the Labrador service as far as Hopedale, will leave St. John’s at ten o’clock tomorrow morning. This will be the final connection for points on this service North of Cartwright.

Weather conditions yesterday were fine, and any people took advantage and proceeded country wards. It is generally noticed that there is a “fallish” look on all sides, and whatever semblance of a summer we have had is now over.

Three boys appeared in the Juvenile Court before Magistrate O’Neill on Saturday, and were charged with stealing goods to the value of $16.00 from Harvey & Co’s premises. They pleaded not guilty. The charge against two of them was dismissed. The third was convicted and was detained until his parents could be communicated with.

We understand that the governing bodies of the Church of England and United Churche at Bonavista, are preparing for another fair to take place towards the latter part of next month. The co-operation between these two bodies is one of the outstanding features of our local culture, and we wish and predict unbounded success for them in their joint undertaking. — Fishermen’s Advocate.

Jacob Somerton was before the Magistrate’s Court on Saturday, and was charged with having in his possession, liquor not obtained from the Board of Liquor Control, and for failing to declare all liquor in his possession. On the first count he was fined $150 or 6 weeks imprisonment, and for the second charge he was sentenced to 7 days in gaol. At the request of Assistant Chief of Police Strange, the premises of the accused were interdicted.

The Bonavista Correspondent of the Fishermen’s Advocate says: “No basic change in weather conditions has yet been made itself apparent enough, though we had a couple of passably fine days last week. A little fish was taken, though the shortage of bait is crippling, even when weather conditions permit fishing. We are glad to report that the outlook for the gardens is not so dark as we anticipated a few days ago. In the past couple of days we have received reports which indicate that so far as staple crops are concerned, the shortage is not likely to be so great. A lot will depend on the weather in the next two or three weeks. It is almost too much to hope however, that the remaining days of the fishing season will compensate for the last month of August and the first half of September.”"


September 24, 1941 WEDDING BELLS "MURPHY — POWER: A wedding of interest to a large circle of friends, was solemnized at the Sacred Heart Church, Placentia, on Wednesday Sept. 10th., when Alicia, daughter of Mrs. and the late Thomas F. Power of Dunville, was united in marriage to Michael F., son of Mrs. and the late John Murphy, also of Dunville. The ceremony was performed by Rev. Wm. O’Flaherty. P.P. Mrs. Michael Tobin, a close friend of the bride, rendered the wedding march.

The bride’s dress was of Copen blue Ramada crepe, with navy accessories, and she carried a bouquet of dusty rose buds, interspersed with lily-of-the-valley and maiden hair fern. She was attended by her sister, Miss Annie Power, who was attired in a dress of dusty Pink Ramada crepe with a corsage of Copen blue apple blossoms. Mr. Jerry Murphy, brother of the groom, who has recently returned from overseas, acted as best man.

After the ceremony, the bridal parted motored to Fullord’s Hotel, South East, where supper was served, after which they returned by motor car to Dunville, where a reception was held at the home of the bride, and where the customary toasts were honoured by their many friends.

Prior to her marriage, the bride was engaged in the Teaching profession. Mr and Mrs. Murphy were the recipients of many practical gifts, and intend making their future home at Dunville. The writer joins with their many friends in wishing then “bon voyage” over the “matrimonial sea.”

MOORES — HUDSON: An interesting wedding took place in Grace United Church, Dartmouth, on September 13th., when Rev. G.B. Pickering, united in marriage, Miss Marjorie Hudson, daughter of Mr and Mrs. J K Hudson, of St. John’s, Newfoundland, and Robert Moores, Halifax, formerly of Blackhead, Newfoundland, son of Mr and Mrs. A.G. Moores, Blackhead. Mrs. Pickering presided at the organ.

The bride wore a teal blue wool dress with jacket and fur trimming, a matching hat and blue accessories, and a corsage of Talisman roses. George A. Moore, Toronto, a friend of the family, gave the bride away. She was attended by Miss Norma Noftle, who wore a burgundy wool dress with matching hat, and her corsage was of white sweet peas and roses. Howard Moores, Blackhead, brother of the groom, was best man.

A reception was held later at the home of the groom’s cousin, Mr and Mrs, J.T. Moores, Dartmouth. Mrs. William Noftle poured tea, and assisting in serving, were Misses Carol Publicover, and Carrie and Jean Noftle. The bride’s table was centred with a three tier wedding cake, and decorated with sweet peas and lighted candles.

Mr and Mrs Moore will reside in Halifax."

September 24, 1941 DEATHS JEANS — Passed peacefully away at the Grace Hospital Tuesday afternoon, September 23rd., Stanley Jeans in his 67th year. Leaving to mourn, besides wife, three daughters, Marion in England, Annetta and Frances at home. Funeral will take place from his late residence, 157 Pennywell Road, Thursday, at 2.30 p.m., to the Church of England cemetery.
September 24, 1941 WAR 25 YEARS AGO TODAY Sept. 24th, 1916 — British took Jenmita and attacked Kara Dakovbala on the Struma front in Mecedonia; Allied patrols active near Doiran. Canadians drove off German counter attacks on Courcellette on Somme front.
September 24, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "His Lordship, Bishop O’Reilly of St. George’s, has announced the re-appointment of Rt. Rev. Monsignor Sears as Vicar General of the Diocese, according to an item in the Humber Herald.

The dance held at the Yacht Pavilion last night, was well attended. Mickey Duggan and his orchestra supplied the music. Another will be held tonight with the same music."


September 25, 1941 THE LAST DUEL SEPTEMBER 25th 1873 "Two Men Fought For Hand of girl — Finished With a Fist Fight. The last duel in Newfoundland was not that which was fought at Robinson’s Hill between Capt. Rudkin and Ensign Philpot, in which the latter was killed. There was a duel in 1873 September 25th, beginning with pistols from which the bullets were taken out, unknown to the principals, and only the powder remained. Augustus Healey and Denis Dooley who fought for the hand of a city belle, one Miss White.

The encounter took place at Fort Townshend where the Police cabbage garden is today. The Seconds were Mr Fred Burnham and Mr. Thomas Allan. Dooley fainted when the guns went off, but Healey stood his ground. The combatants, followed by their seconds and the crowd, then went to John Casey’s field, LeMarchant Road, to fight it out with their fists, where Healey won the day. The Police, under Sergt. Sullivan, then came on the scene and dispersed the crowd, and arrested the principals and their Seconds.

There is an old song handed down, relating to the event, of which this day September 25th 1873, is the anniversary.

“On Friday last at half past two, Two love-stricken chaps, Up in Fort Townshend Hollow met For satisfaction’s raps. One of them, Gus Healey was, The other Dooley Din, Come over here from Heart’s Content, Miss White’s green heart to win. Sergt Sullivan the gallant cop, Brought six Policemen out, And turned the pistolizing crowd Around to the right about. With pistols hugged beneath their arms, They went to Casey’s Farm, Where Dooley Din got well oiled-off, behind John Casey’s barn."" P.K.D."

September 25, 1941 FIRST CHILD BORN "Victoria Ann Warren, Daughter of Lieut. A and Mrs. Pratt Warren, Born at St. Clare’s Mercy Hospital September 21st. With at least two, and perhaps three firsts to her credit, Victoria Ann Warren entered her first year of life, as the daughter of Lieut. A and Mrs. Pratt A. Warren, Newfoundland Base Command, U.S. Army. Born at St. Clare’s Mercy Hospital, St. John’s on September 21st, Victoria Ann, in addition to being the first child born to the Warren’s, is also the first to be born to any member of the American Military Forces stationed in Newfoundland, the First Base of American Forces overseas. Still another first is possible, in that she may be the first child to be born in any of the newly organized based.

Lt. Warren is a native of Kansas, having entered the military service by way of the Thomson Act. and transferring to the Regular Army in 1940. Mrs Warren, the former Mary Ann Kaul, formerly lived at Fairault, Minnesota. The Warrens live at 25 Monkstown Road, St. John’s."

September 25, 1941 PASSENGERS FROM FOGO SERVICE A passenger list from the gulf steamer was not received yesterday. The following passengers arrived yesterday morning from the Fogo Route; Miss D. Forsey, Miss I. Winter, Mr and Mrs. G. Downer, Mr and Mrs. D Bursey, Mr and Mrs F. House, Miss D Barbour, Mrs. G Matthews, Mrs. W. Chapman, Miss M.E. Hiscock, Mrs. R. White, Mrs. K Richards and child, Miss M.B. Burke, G. Ellsworth, Ranger Peet, T. Humphries.
September 25, 1941 DIED AT THE GOULDS Mr. John Howlett, an aged and well known resident of the Goulds Road, died there on Tuesday morning, after a short illness. Interment took place in the R.C. Cemetery at the Goulds yesterday afternoon, and was largely attended, including some friends from St. John’s. Very Rev. E.J. Rawlins P.P., read the last prayers for the departed at the Church, after which, interment was in the Church grounds nearby.
September 25, 1941 FUNERAL OF LATE PTE. A.W. PAYNE "A large number of ex-service-men turned out yesterday afternoon to attend the last obsequies of their old Comrade, No. 2886, Pte. Arthur W. Payne, of the Royal Newfoundland Regiment. The funeral which took place, from Merrymeeting Road, had a most representative cortege. Comrades of the Great War acted as pall-bearers, and the casket was draped in the Union Jack and carried many beautiful floral tributes.

The Dominion Command of the G.W.V.A. was represented by Secretary W.R. Martin and Vice-President S. Dewling M.M., and there were also representatives of the Society of United Fishermen, Lodge No. 5, of which the deceased had been a member.

Interment was in the Church of England Cemetery, where the service was taken by Rev. J.T. Rhodes, and at the grave side the G.W.V.A. Ritual was recited by Capt. L.C. Murphy, followed by the falling of the poppies of remembrance.

Thus under the clear blue skies and sunshine of a September afternoon, was another splendid Newfoundland Soldier laid to rest."

September 25, 1941 BLUE PUTTEES’ RE-UNION The Committee in charge of the annual Blue Puttees’ re-union, will meet at the G.W.V.A. Headquarters tonight Thursday, to make arrangements for their 27th anniversary celebrations.
September 25, 1941 THIS MORNING’S WEDDING "In the Church of St. Joseph’s at Petty Harbor, this morning, with Nuptial Mass, there will take place the marriage of Miss Margaret Hefferman of Maddox Cove, to Mr. Francis Cantwell, of Cape Spear.

The ceremony will be performed by Very Rev. E.J. Rawlins, P.P., and the wedding breakfast will be held at Jack Robinson’s Hostelry. A number of guests, including friends and relatives of the contracting parties from St. John’s, have been invited, and the event is one of much local social interest."

September 25, 1941 INCREASE OF FARES "The Newfoundland Railway gives notice that effective October 1st., passenger fares will be increased on the Carbonear and Argentia Branch Lines, and between all points East of Placentia Junction.

Some years ago, the fares in this section were reduced to a basis, considerably lower that fares West of Placentia Junction, and under the new tariff, effective Oct. 1st., the former rates will be restored. This arrangement will not effect the through fares now in effect, to or from points beyond Placentia Junction.

Examples of fares effective Oct. 1st are: 1st. class 2nd class, St John’s to Carbonear, $4.00, $2.40. St. John’s to Argentia, $4.10, $2.50."

September 25, 1941 OBITUARY "MARY KAVANAGH BUSH: It is with profound regret we record the passing on September 15th., of Mrs. William Bush. The deceased was the daughter of the late Arthur and Mary Kavanagh of this city. Mrs. Bush was stricken with paralysis on September 13th. She entered St. Clare’s Hospital where everything possible was done to revive her, but on Monday, September 15th., fortified by the rites of Holy Church, she calmly and peacefully breathed her last.

The late Mrs. Bush was a lady of that splendid type, whose main interest in life was her home and family. Possessed of a kind disposition, her humorous and cheerful manner won for her a great many friends.

A faithful and regular attendant at St. Patrick’s Church, she was also a member of St. Anne’s and Blessed Virgin Society. A kindly neighbour, she was ever ready to render a good deed to those who needed it. The funeral took place on Wednesday, September 17th., from her late residence, 90 Hamilton Street. At the Cathedral, service for the dead was recited by Rev. Fr. McGrath. Burial was in Belvedere Cemetery.

Thus passed from our midst a good citizen, loyal wife and mother, a true friend. She will be sadly missed, especially by her husband and only daughter Helen, also left to mourn are her sister Maud, three brothers, John, Lawrence, and Frederick, to all of whom sincerest sympathy is extended."

September 25, 1941 DEATHS "FORAN — Passed peacefully away at St. Clare’s Mercy Hospital on Wednesday, September 24th, 1941, Margaret Foran, daughter of the late John W. and Margaret A. Foran. Funeral by motor hearse from the residence of Mr. Frank Kenny, 42 Cochrane Street, on Friday, September 26th., at 2.30 p.m.

NOLAN — Passed peacefully away at his son’s residence at 3 o’clock yesterday morning, Patrick Nolan, aged 79 years; leaving a wife, one son, one daughter, and two brothers, to mourn their sad loss. Funeral on tomorrow, Friday, at 2.30 p.m., from his son’s residence, Topsail Road.

SHAW — Passed peacefully away at 11.20 p.m. yesterday, Wednesday, September 24th, at the Fever Hospital, Frederick Shaw (Tinsmith), in his 38th year, son of Priscilla and the late Henry C. Shaw, leaving to mourn wife, one son, Henry, mother, three brothers, John, Henry, and Hayward, and three sisters, Patience (Mrs. Fred McDonaugh) at Ausable Forks, New York, Ella (Mrs. Clifford Noel) and Mollie (Mrs. Edward Collins), both of the city. Funeral notice later. United States papers please copy."

September 25, 1941 ANNOUNCEMENT The engagement is announced of Monica, the youngest daughter of Mary and the late Edward Durdle, of this city, to Albert, son of Mr. and Mrs N.R.J. Wright of Montreal, Canada.
September 25, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "A large cargo of flour consigned to various Conception Bay Dealers, was discharged at an East Coast port last week, according to the Bay Roberts Guardian.

A number of fishermen and their families returned to Bay Roberts from the Labrador last week.

Weather conditions yesterday, were excellent, and many people enjoyed the half holiday out of town. Farmers availed of the weather to get in some hay that had been out for some time. Others were cutting and spreading fodder.

Gus Hambling of the Hudson Bay Co’s Fort Chimo Post, arrived at Bay Roberts last week on a visit to his parents, Mr. and Mrs. J.F. Hambling. Gus has spent the past five years at various posts on the Labrador, in the Hudson Bay Co. employ.

It is learned that Sergeant O.P. Kelland, of the Constabulary, who has spent the past three years in Bay Roberts, has been transferred to St. John’s, and leaves with his family this week. It is not known who his successor in Bay Roberts will be. — Bay Roberts Guardian.

His Excellency, the Apostolic Delegate, entrained at St. George’s for the return trip to Ottawa. He was given an enthusiastic send-off, and at St. Andrew’s, he was greeted by parishioners with a band of bagpipes, to do honour to the distinguished visitor. — Humber Herald.

The Twillingate Sun states that most fishermen were doing well last week, with some of the boats loading daily, at the Arms. One boat crew of two, made $20.00 on one day. If suitable fishing weather prevails, much cash will be put in circulation, as a result of the sale of fillets to the Fresh Fish Plant, and livers to the Oil Factory.

Miss Maggie Walsh, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Timothy Walsh, Aguathuna East, fell off a truck recently at Boswarlos. She struck her head and raised quite a bump. Then almost immediately, she bumped her head on the organ in the hall. It must have been the already damaged spot, because she became unconscious for several hours, not speaking until the following day, and then only a few words, after which she lapsed into delirium from which she had not recovered at the end of last week."


September 26, 1941 WEDDING AT PETTY HARBOR "The Canwell – Heffernan Nuptials Yesterday Morning. “But happy they, the happiest of their kind, Whom gentler stars unite, and in one fate their Hearts, their Fortunes, and their Beings blend.” — Thomson.

The Church of St. Joseph, in the well-known settlement of Petty Harbor, St. John’s West, was the scene of a very pretty wedding yesterday morning, when Miss Mary Margaret Heffernan (daughter of Mr. and Mrs Michael Heffernan, of Maddox Cove) was united in the bonds of Holy Matrimony to Mr. Francis Joseph Cantwell (son of Mr. and Mrs. William Cantwell, of Cape Spear.)

The ceremony was beautifully exemplified with the celebration of Nuptial Mass by Very Rev. E.J. Rawlins, P.P., in the presence of a very large congregation, including the relatives and friends. The bridesmaid was Miss Nora Heffernan, while Mr. Weston Cantwell acted in the capacity of best man.

It was a pretty picture when the bridal party had assembled within the Altar rails for the ceremony. The bride was attired in white Liberty satin and lace, with flowing veil to match; she wore white satin shoes and white French lace gloves. Her bouquet consisted of carnations, lilies and maiden hair fern. The bridesmaid, her sister, was dressed in powder blue ivory satin, with shoulder length veil, and silver shoes. She carried a bouquet of carnation and ferns. The flower girl was little Eileen Bidgood, who was an attractive picture in pink silk organdie, with hat to match; she carried a basket of pink and white roses.

After the wedding, the couple proceeded to St. Edward’s School, where the bride had been a member of the teaching staff, and where the present Teachers and pupils had assembled in the class-room. Master Willie Chafe, on behalf of the Altar Boys, read a beautifully illuminated address, and Miss Margaret Chafe on behalf of the girls, presented appropriate souvenirs of remembrance.

The wedding party then motored to Mr. Jack Robinson’s Hostelry at Donvoan’s, where the wedding breakfast was served to some thirty guest. The toast to the bride and groom was proposed by Rev. E.J. Rawlins, who spoke in felicitous terms of the event commemorated, and Mr. Cantwell made a suitable reply. Capt. L.C. Murphy toasted the health of the parents, and short address were also given by Miss Josephine Halley, Messrs Joseph F. Cantwell, and Geo. Summers. This very pleasant affair terminated at noon.

The bride’s going away dress was an Air Force Blue costume with wine accessories. The honeymoon will be spent at “Sea View Hotel”, Bay Bulls, and the many friends of Mr. and Mrs. Cantwell will wish them many years of happy wedded bliss."

September 26, 1941 PORT REXTON NOTES "Weather Interferes With Berry Picking. PORT REXTON, Sept 23. — News received yesterday from the three fishing schooners not yet home from the Labrador, states that they are on the homeward. Chas. Butler, Master, arrived at Catalina in yesterday’s storm, having loss a motor boat. Although the weather has been reported to be stormy on the Labrador Coast all summer, and conditions bad, yet the schooners from this place are reported to have saving trips. We wish the skippers and crews pleasant sailing for the remained of the voyage.

The berry picking season is here again and people are eager to be in the woods, as berries are plentiful and a good price is being paid for them. But the weather conditions are unfavorable, and rain almost every morning, when people are just about ready to set out, is very disappointing. Some of the Storekeepers started by paying 30 cents a gallon, but it is said the price has risen to 40 cents. At this rate, with fine weather, a good day’s pay could be made. .

PERSONAL: Dr. C.T. Fitzgerald returned from St. John’s by the S.S. Glencoe. He accompanied his son, Bruorton, to town, from where he proceeded to Canada to take up his studies for the coming year.

Mrs. C.G. Butler and daughters, Geraldine and Ruby, returned from Montreal on Friday, Sept. 5th. They spent two months in Canada and theirs was a very enjoyable holiday.

Rev. F. and Mrs. Hollands, recently returned from St. John’s, where they had been spending a two week holiday.

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Rex. Jr., are receiving the congratulations of their many friends, on the birth of a daughter on Sept. 2nd.

Congratulations are also extended to Mr. and Mrs. Bertram Cook on the birth of a baby girl recently.

Among salesmen visiting here during the last few days, were, Mr. Young, Mr. Evans and Mr. T. Jenkins. CORRESPONDENT

OBITUARY: MISS ELIZA RANDELL: There passed peacefully away at Woolford Hotel, Placentia, on Wednesday, Sept. 10th., Miss Eliza Randell in her 55th year. For the past few years, the deceased was employed at the Hotel there, during the summer months, but returned in the Fall to spend the Winter here with her brother, Mr. Ernest Randell. The body arrived here by Friday’s train, and the funeral took place on Saturday afternoon to Christ Church. She leaves to mourn one sister, Mrs. Elizah Randell, and three brothers, James, Ernest and Charles, all of this place. Sympathy is extended to the bereaved relatives."


September 27, 1941 NAVAL VOLUNTEERS "The following Naval Volunteers have arrived at St. John’s for interview and final medical examination:

BELL ISLAND DISTRICT:— Daniel Joseph Neville, Joseph Christopher Dobbin, William John Pynn, Charles Henry Skanes, John Clayton Rees, Jack Goodison Case, Robert Melvin Skanes, John Joseph Byrne, Albert Edgar Blackmore, Harold Boone, Raymond Decker, Walter Joseph Fitzgerald, Clayton Harvey, Peter Kevin Kent, Richard Lahey, Alexander Parsons, Stanley Parsons, Charles Maxwell Rees, James Kevin Sweeney, James Shea, Eber Kearley, William Henry Geo. Bursey.

BONAVISTA DISTRICT: — Clement Tremblett, Eli Ivany, Chesley Vokey, Eugene Joseph Downey, Eliol Joseph Miller, Augustus Pippy.

BONNE BAY DISTRICT: — Gordon Rufus Payne.

CARBONEAR DISTRICT: — Thomas Hedges, George Frederick Marshall, Ronald Richard Barteau, Lewis Howard Mercer, James Leo Whalen, Thomas Patrick Coombs, Malcolm George Whalen, William Crane.

CLARENVILLE DISTRICT: — Bernard Seward, William Benedict Ryan, Edward Clarence Genge, Andrew Rogers, Felix BAll.

CORNER BROOK DISTRICT: — Theodore Stone, Eli John Saunders, Ronald DeVerge Park, Gilbert Roy Park, Mark Stuckless, Francis Conrad Loader, Rufus Hutchings, Howard James Marshall, Eli Sheppard, Frank Young, Walter Llewellyn Wight, John Henry, Baxter Sheppard.

GRAND BANK DISTRICT: — Chesley Wilfred Patten.

Grand Falls District: — Edmund Abbott, Clyde Chaulk, William Francis White, Lewis Harvey, Arthur James Sheppard, Raymond Eugene White, Maurice Joseph Barry, Edward Breen, Angus Graham Lane, Ronald George Whalen, Hardy Frank Luff, Hedley Newhook, Emanuel Anderson, Henry Douglas Langdon, Frederick Burrill Langdon, Ralph George Milley, John William Byrne, Curtis Moreley Leyden, Ives Lorenzo Layte, Stephen Tulk, Leonard Vernon Grimes, Harold James Goodyear, Leslie Martin Farr, George Woodrow Churchill, Percy Ford Moores, Douglas Halfyard, Reuben Murdock Patey, Frank Wheaton, Joseph Thomas Miles.

HOLYROOD DISTRICT: — Thomas Smith, William Smith.

La SCIE DISTRICT: — John Thomas Packwood, Malcolmn Norman, Ralph Elms, Chesley Decker, Malcolm Regular, Henry Elms, Alan Gavin.

PLACENTIA DISTRICT: – Peter Fewer.

SPRINGDALE DISTRICT: — William Roy May.

St. MARY’S DISTRICT: — Patrick Leo Wall.

St. ANTHONY DISTRICT: — William Joseph Whalen.

St. GEORGE DISTRICT: — Wallace Cornet, Stanley McLean, Raymond McLean, William Dunphney, Richard Joseph Bruce, Arthur Vincent Samms, Isaac Kendell.

TWILLINGATE DISTRICT: — Albert Paynter, Cyril Chancey Verge, Leonder Earle, Benedict Burke, Barke, Francis Garfield Brown, Gregory Sexton, Allan Kitchener Collins, Thomas William Loder."

September 27, 1941 OBITUARY "Mrs. S.K. BELL: The passing of Mrs. S.K. Bell which occurred yesterday, following as long illness, has been learned with great regret throughout the city. Mrs. Bell, who was in her 77th year, had been taken ill over a year ago while on a visit to Prince Edward Island.

She was the second child of George Graham Crosbie of Brigus, in which town she was born in 1865. After completing her education, she taught school for a brief period before her marriage to the late Capt. Harry Bartlett. By this marriage, she had two children, Sybil, now Mrs. Gordon Harrower of Togabo, British West Indias, and Elizabeth, who was married in 1939 to Paymaster, Commander R. Pearce, and whose untimely death, which occurred a few months ago in England, came as a great shock to her family. She married Hon. Samuel Bell in 1898, by whom she had one son, Charles R. Bell of this city.

The late Mrs. Bell was a woman of much enterprise and ability, and for more than thirty years managed with great success, the Crosbie Hotel, which she inherited from her mother. Her business interests were not allowed to interfere with her social service obligations, and she was active all her life in charitable, Church, and educational works. Her special interest was the United Church Orphanage, on the board of which she served for many years, and she was founder of Arbour Day, which is annually commemorated at the institution. She was also prominent in the activities of the Ladies’ College Aid Society, of which she was for some years the President. Mrs. Bell was also a member of the committee formed after the last war, to undertake the erection of a National War Memorial. To all these various undertakings she gave devoted service, and this was appreciated, not only for what she did herself, but for the inspiration which she gave to others.

She is survived by her daughter, Mrs. Harrower, her son Charles R. Bell, by two brothers, George Crosbie in New York and Walter in Bay Roberts, and by two sisters, Mrs. Woodman and Mrs. Rogers of Prince Edward Island. To the bereaved relatives the News extends its very sincere sympathy."

September 27, 1941 LAID TO REST "The funeral of the late Stanley Jeans, of the Nfld Forestry Corps. which tool place on Thursday afternoon, was largely attended, and the usual last tribute of the G.W.V.A. was paid at the C. of E. Cemetery, where interment took place.

Deceased was over military age during the last war, but was determined to “do his bit”, and went overseas with the Forestry Unit, where he rendered excellent service, and had many friends amongst all ranks.

President W.D. Edwards and Secretary W.R. Martin represented the G.W.V.A. at the last obsequies, and the fluttering of the flag over Dominion Headquarters, announced the passing of another true Newfoundlander and son of the Empire, who has gone to join the Silent Battalions."

September 27, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "A number of Water Street Stores yesterday, had window displays designed to make an appeal for Red Cross Flag Day, which is today.

The Summerside Correspondent of the Western Star states; “The heavy frost of last week left its mark on our vegetables patches, blackened leaves and ruined cucumbers are the result.”

The annual chicken supper and sale of work of the United Church Topsail Ladies Association, will be held in the new United Church Hall on Wednesday next, October 1st.

Twenty five horses housed at the Sanitary Department last week, consumed 3500 lbs hay, 25 sacks oats, and 3 sacks bran, as well as using 350 lbs straw. The cost of all was $134.50.

The Wedding of Miss Margaret Pike, daughter of Mrs. Cyril Pretty of Port aux Basques, to Mr. Bret Sharpe of Corner Brook, took place at St. James Church, Port aux Basques, on September 17th.

A motorist who was before Court yesterday, charged with exceeding the speed limited on Military Road, was fined $3.00.

The regular monthly meeting of the Star of the Sea Association will be held tomorrow afternoon. At this meeting, nomination of officers and executive for the coming year will be held.

In the last week, there were sixty-two men working in the Sanitary Department with 20 horses. In the period 559 loads of ashes and garbage were deposited on various dumps, and 10 gullies were dipped and carted, and 53 gullies cleaned.

At Pennywell Road in the past week, four hundred feet of curb and gutter were laid and 300 feet of ground excavated. Work is progressing satisfactorily at the laying of the concrete sidewalk on Harvey Road. Seventy six feet of inverts were laid in Kenna’s Hill.

Quite a large number of sportsmen are preparing to get on the grounds for the opening of the shooting season, and some will go out tomorrow to be there at dawn on Wednesday. Reports from some sections are that partridge are plentiful, whilst other parts report a scarcity.

The latest and best in the washing and locker rooms for mill employees at Corner Brook, has now been planned and will be started immediately. There will be four in all, the first in the paper mill, the second in the screen room, third in the sulphite plant, and fourth at the boiler plant. – Western Star.

For the past week or more, woodsmen have been arriving to sign up for the winter cut of pulp wood. Some of these men have now visited their homes for hay cutting, others are beginners, but all of them are looking forward to a good year’s work under the greatly improved conditions now existing, and which have been existing for the past three years. This season’s cut will again be a heavy one, and though shipping conditions have been delaying delivery of supplies somewhat, things are well in hand for a satisfactory delivery of hay and feeds before navigation closes. — Western Star."

September 27, 1941 BIRTH FLEMING — At St. Clare’s Mercy Hospital on Wednesday, September 24th, to Mr. and Mrs J.F. Fleming, Bell Island, a son.
September 27, 1941 MARRIED McCARTHY – CARROLL: At St. Joseph’s Church on Sept. 25th., with a Nuptial Mass by Rev. Fr. Ryan, Anne M., daughter of the late Richard and Elizabeth Carroll of the city, to Felix J., son of Mary and the late John McCarthy of Carbonear.
September 27, 1941 DEATHS BELL — Early yesterday morning, after a long illness, Martha Ellen, widow of the late Hon. S.K. Bell; leaving one son, Charles R. Bell, of the city and one daughter Mrs. R.H. Harrower of Tobago, West Indies. Funeral by motor hearse on Sunday at 2.30 p.m., from her late residence, Rennie’s Mill Road.
September 27, 1941 REMEMBER WHEN Outfielder Babe Ruth, pitching his first game in nine years, hurled New York Yankees to an easy 9-3 victory over Boston Red Sox in the American League game 11 years ago today. The home-run king–a great southpaw pitcher with the Red Sox in 1916 and 1917 – allowed 11 hits.

September 29, 1941 WEDDING BELLS "IVANY — HILLIER: SHOAL HARBOR. Sept. 25. — Shoal Harbor Church was the scene of a very pretty wedding on the evening of Wednesday September 17th., when Lena, daughter of the late Garland and Mrs. Ivany, was united in marriage to George Hillier, son of Mr. and Mrs. Archibald Hillier of Campbellton, Rev. R.W. French, B.A., officiating.

The bride entered the Church escorted by her brother, Huntley, to the strains of the Bridal Chorus (Lohengrin) which was beautifully rendered by Mrs. W.L. Butler. The bride was becomingly gowned in white satin with lace yoke, pointed sleeves, and a train. Her tulle veil was attached to a coronet of calla lilies. She carried a bouquet of mauve and white dahlias. The two little flower girls, Ena and Leone Ivany, nieces of the bride, looked charming in long dresses of rose organdy and carried baskets of yellow roses. The groom was attended by Mr. Frank Ivany and Mr. John Peddle.

During the signing of the register, the Hymn, “O Perfect Love” was sung. The wedding procession left the Altar while Mendelssohn’s wedding march was being played. The little flower girls strewed rose petals in the path of the happy couple.

Following the ceremony, a reception was held at the bride’s home, which was attended by a host of friends and relations. Among the guests were Mrs. Max Rideout and Miss Clemmie Hillier of Campbellton, sisters of the groom. Supper was served at a beautifully decorated table, and the young couple received many useful gifts.

Mrs. Hillier was formerly a United Church Teacher and last taught at White Rock Trinity Bay. Mr. and Mrs. Hillier will spend their honeymoon at Campbellton. We offer our most sincere felicitations."

September 29, 1941 DEATHS "HISCOCK — At Grace Hospital Sunday, Sept. 28th., Edmund Hiscock. Funeral from his late residence at Brigus Tuesday, at 2.30 p.m.

COLLINS — Passed away after a brief illness, Sept. 27th. Baxter, son of Carrie and the late William Collins; left to mourn, a loving mother, 3 sisters, 2 brothers. Funeral today at 2.30 p.m. from his late residence, 21 Bannerman Street.

NEWMAN — Passed away Saturday morning, Sept. 23rd., after a long illness, John Frederick Newman in is 73rd year, (formerly Chief Dispatcher of the General Post Office); leaving to mourn, wife, four sons, Capt. A.S. Newman, residing in England; George, Jack, and Edward of this city; two daughters, Mrs. Frank Arnold, residing in New York, and Marion at home; also two sisters and one brother. Funeral today at 2.30, from his late residence, 7 Parade Street."

September 29, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "Large numbers of the men who are working in St. John’s on the various construction works, and whose homes can be reached by buses and cars, return home for the week ends. Buses and trucks are kept busy on Saturday night and Sunday, taking the men back.

An extraordinary special meeting of the Newfoundland Protective Association of Shop and Office Employees, will be held in Victoria Hall on Wednesday night at eight o’clock, when a report will be received from the committee appointed to negotiate amendment to wage scale.

The monthly meeting of the Newfoundland Fishermen’s Star of the Sea Association, was held yesterday afternoon, at which much business was transacted including nomination of officers and executive for the coming year. The election will be held at the annual meeting in October.

The Fishermen’s Advocate states: “With berries thirty cents per gallon, every man, woman and child who can possible get in the woods, are picking the crimson wealth of the barrens, and carrying them to the different stores, who are buying this valuable fruit for export.

The Murray’s Pond Club House will close for the season as from tomorrow, September 30th.

Partridge berries are reported to be plentiful on the barrens in all sections. Those who visited the Southside Hills yesterday secured good baskets.

A labourer who was employed at the Quidi Vidi Base, was before the Magistrate’s Court on Saturday, charged with being drunk and disorderly. He was find $15.00. Evidence of the Chief of Police at Fort Pepperell was that the man was under the influence of liquor, and started to obstruct traffic, and when he was cautioned, he showed fight.

The women’s Association of Gower Street Church will hold a sale of work, tea and concert in the Lecture Hall on Thursday.

A meeting of the Society for the Protection of Animals will be held at the City Hall on Monday next Oct. 6th., when important business will be transacted.

Saturday was a very busy one with the business houses, and in the night, the number of patrons in the stores was like what is usually experienced during the Christmas season.

A resident of Kelligrews and driver of a motor delivery van, was charged with having faulty brakes on his vehicle, at the Magistrate’s Court on Saturday. He was fined $25.00.

A girl who stated she was nineteen years of age, was before the Magistrate’s Court on Saturday, charged with being loose and disorderly on board a foreign ship. She was arrested at four o’clock on Saturday morning. The Captain of the ship was also charged with permitting her to be on board. Evidence showed, the Captain was ashore at the time, and the charge against him was dismissed. The girl was remanded for investigation.

A man who was charged with a breach of section 39 of the highway Traffic Act — stealing a motor car, the property of William Parsons, Harvey Road, was before Court on Saturday, and was fined $50.00. Sergt. Pike giving evidence, stated that information that the car was stolen, was received at 1.30 and later he with Constables Whitten and Butler, found the car parked in front of the residence of the accused. On Saturday, His Honour Judge Browne heard a case in which a resident of Torbay is suing a lady owner of a motor car, for damages caused when the car collided with the horse and cart of the plaintiff. At the time, the car was being driven by a member of the Navy. Evidence was taken in the forenoon and afternoon, but was not concluded, and the case continues this afternoon. Mr. J.A. Gibbs appears for the plaintiff and Mr. Isaac Mercer for the defendant."


September 30, 1941 BIRTHS GLENDINNING — At the Burin Cottage Hospital on September 29th., to Dorothy, wife of Corporal Ian Glendinning, a daughter, mother and baby doing well.
September 30, 1941 MARRIAGE "GREEN — DELANEY: At the Oratory of the Sacred Heart Convent of Mercy, on September 29th., Mary Ursula, daughter of Mrs. and the late Charles Delaney, of this city, to Thomas G., Son of Mrs. and the late Edward Green of Placentia.

HAMMOND – KENNDY: The marriage of Mr. Patrick Hammond of Lance Cove, to Miss Minnie Kenndy, took place last week. — The Bell Islander

ROBBINS — HIBBS: The wedding of Mr. Fred Robbins of the Front, to Miss Dorothy Hibbs of Wabana, on last Tuesday afternoon. — The Bell Islander"

September 30, 1941 DEATHS "RYALL — Passed peacefully away at 11.30 p.m. yesterday, September 29th, after a short illness, Robert Ryall, Shoemaker, in 84th year. Funeral notice later.

TUCKER — Died at Harbor Grace on Monday, September 29th., 1941 Abela Tucker in her 80th year, the youngest daughter of the late Captain John H. and Lavinia Ann Tucker. Funeral at Harbor Grace. She leaves one sister, Mrs. John W. Taylor, and one brother Stephen J. Tucker, Springdale Street, St. John’s.

SHEPPARD — One of the oldest residents and early settlers at Grand Falls, passed away on September 19th., after an illness of fourteen days, and in his 74th year. Mr. Eldred Sheppard went to Grand Falls from Hr. Grace thirty-four years ago, during construction days. He helped build, and after ran, the Slasher Mill of the A.N.D. Co’s plant, being the man who cut the very first log in the mill. — Grand Falls Advertiser."

September 30, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "The Red Cross of the Newfoundland Graduate Nurses Association, will meet at the offices of the Departmental Nursing Service, Y.M.C.A. building tonight, at 7.30 o’clock.

A shopkeeper whose business place is on New Gower Street, was before the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, charged with selling overproof beer. The evidence of Constable Cox was that a sample of the beer when analysed, showed 3.45 per cent alcohol. A fine of $10.00 was imposed.

The new quarters for men of the Mercantile Marine, situated in the L.D.A. Hall on the Scotia Ridge, were to have opened last night with a card party and dance, prizes won in the recent garden exhibition were distributed. — The Bell Islander.

An unusual sight in St. John’s was seen on Sunday morning on Military and Queen’s Road. It was a goat; there was a time when goats ran over the streets in numbers almost as great as dogs, but for some years they have been absent. Perhaps Sunday’s visitor was an advance guard.

It is learned that the annual Agricultural Exhibition will not be held this year, owing to the backward conditions of the crops due to the poor weather. The decision not to hold the exhibition this season has been taken on the advice of the Department of Agriculture. — The Bell Islander.

Mr. W. King, Customs Collector at Corner Brook since the start of the mill operations, is being transferred to a post in St. John’s. Mr. King’s successor will be Mr. George Cobb, Customs Collector at Grand Falls, who is to be succeeded by Mr. H.L. Winsor, recently promoted from the staff of the Corner Brook Office. Mr.Winsor’s successor is R.G. Knight, who has already enter upon his duties in the “long room”. — Humber Hearld."


October 2, 1941 OBITUARY "Mrs. Bride Sullivan (Placentia): After a short illness, and with all that medical skill and the attentive nursing of the devoted Sisters of St. Clare’s Mercy Hospital could achieve, there passed away on August 14th, fortified by the rites of Holy Church, the soul of Bride Mary Sullivan (nee Bruce), beloved wife of P.F. Sullivan, Placentia. She had the consolation of having with her at the dread hour, the loving attention of her daughter, Sr. Cornelia of the Presentation Convent Cathedral Square.

Bride, as she was familiarly called by her hosts of friends, was an indefatigable worker at Church functions, meetings etc., and any advise she offered was invariably acted upon. These friends will sadly miss her.

Left to mourn their sad loss, are her husband, two sons, Wilfred working at Argentia, and Patrick of the Postal Telegraphs; four daughters, Mrs. Neil Power, Sr. Cornelia, Presentation Convent St. John’s, Genevieve, and Maureen at home.

After Requiem Mass, on August 16th, her remains were laid to rest in the quite cemetery overlooking the town, there to await the final call, and to hear those beautiful words of her dear Lord, “Come ye blessed of My Father and possess the Kingdom prepared for you.”"

October 2, 1941 THROUGH THE AVENUE "An Approach to St. Michael’s, at Belvedere.

The bare trees used to meet over the Avenue, and the gray brown twigs were chattering and fighting as October comes. On the other side of the Avenue, the stalks of weeds made a blur of color, but there was always the open gate. The gravel crunched under our feet, and the sun was mellow on the lawn or the ivy, which we seemed to see was covering a hallowed building. The steps there were worn long years ago, but these same steps are being treaded by the youthful, cheerful girls of St. Michael’s. This is not an orphanage, as we knew it; it is a guiding step. A help to the future. How can one review it?.

Our recollection is of a quite walk, when happy children, well dressed, contented, moved along a road. Our mind carries us too, how nicely they were dressed. Of the little girl in pink and white; a Sister picked her up and said, “I’m afraid you can’t walk any further.” I saw these things.

Alway a thought–that is the spirit of remembrance. Of these Sisters, they do exactly what you and I indifferently think. Surely the collection will be worth while. (L.C.M.)"

October 2, 1941 BIRTHS DRISCOLL — At Grace Maternity Hospital, October 1st., to Queenie (Vallis) wife of Walter Driscoll, a son.
October 2, 1941 IN MEMORIAM "SOMERTON — In memory of ex-Private Charles Somerton, who was accidentally killed Sept. 29th., 1922. Inserted by his father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. Richard J Somerton."
October 2, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "The weekly meeting of the City Council will be held this afternoon, and some interesting matters are expected to be discussed.

The Radio Bowling Alleys will reopen today. They have been reconditioned and are now in first class shape.

Cochrane Street Choir will in future, meet on Friday evenings in the League Room. This is instead of Thursday as in the past.

Dr. McKay of Dalhousie University will be the speaker at today’s meeting of the Rotary Club. Rotarian Alan Fraser will be Chairman for the day.

Workmen are repairing and renovating the building which was formerly used as a coal shed by Adrian Dawe, and which will now be the Nail Manufacturing Plant of Dawe’s Nail and Hardware Ltd. — Bay Roberts Guardian.

A few boats are fishing out of Bay Bulls whenever weather conditions permit. No squid made its appearance this year, but herring is being used for bait, and the fishermen reports that fish is plentiful, and if squid was available, good catches would be made.

Last Saturday about 7 p.m., when a motorist went to his garage to take out his car, he discovered the hinges of the door were forced off, and an entrance had been made. A bicycle which was kept there was missing, and the matter was reported to the Police, who found the stolen bicycle in a grove near the railway tracks. Two brothers aged 8 and 12, were responsible for the theft. — Bay Roberts Guardian.

Pork production in 1941 will reach 1,230,000 lbs., an increase of 10 per cent over 1940, it has been estimated by Agriculture Department officials in Canada. They feel confident that Canada will be able to meet the requirements of Britain for 600,000,000 lbs. bacon in the new agreement period, which starts November 1st.

The Newfoundland Trade Review, states that pastry flour prices have again advanced, raising twenty cents above the level of two weeks ago. The Farmers of Ontario are reported to be so busy with farm work, that they have no time to market their wheat, and there is a scarcity at present. Mill feeds have advanced. There is no local corn available, and what is being brought in from Manitoba is very high in price. Regarding flour and feed, one usually informed source states: “I believe that if everyone wants to buy, they should buy now. You can print that in the biggest type you’ve got.” White beans, oatmeal and rolled oats are all higher."


October 3, 1941 MISSING IN ACTION The Secretary for Defence, Lt. Col. W.F. Rendell, has been advised by the R.C.A.F. Record Officer, Gloucester, England, of the following casualty: DICKS, John, Bartlett, RCAF Sergeant, Can/R65446 missing September 28th 1941. Aircraft failed to return to base after operation flight. Next of kin, father, Mr. John Alfred Dicks, Hr. Buffett, Placentia Bay, Newfoundland.
October 3, 1941 DEATH "PIERCEY — Suddenly at one o’clock this morning at his late residence, 19 Boncloddy St., Samuel Piercey. Funeral notice later.

SKANES — Passed peacefully away Oct. 2nd., William Skanes, aged 85 years. Funeral on tomorrow Saturday, at 2.30 p.m., from his late residence, 22 Hayward Ave. R.I.P."

October 3, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "During the past week, 108 feet of six inch cast iron water pipe, were laid in Monchy Street, and the work there is now completed. The laying of the new six inch water main in Suez Street was also completed, and a total of 828 feet were laid.

Petroleum products were used at a rate of 150,000,000 gallons a day in the United States during 1940.

Mr. Eric Hinton has been appointed Assistant Manager of the Hydro-Electric Department of the Company, to take effect from Oct 1st., 1941. The above notice was posted on the bulletin board at the general office of Bowaters Nfld. Pulp and Paper Mills Ltd., Corner Brook, and signed by Mr. H.M.S. Lewin, General Manager. — Western Star.

A motorist who was charged with exceeding the speed limit in the city, was fined $5.00 at the Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

The first ice dance for the season will be held at the Arena tonight. A large attendance is expected.

The Summerside Correspondent of the Western Star, states that “Work is now going on at full swing at the new Herring Oil Plant. It is certainly a great accomplishment for the time it has been under construction, especially considering the drawbacks of continual bad weather, and almost a continual lack of building supplies.

Several cases for breaches of the Highway Traffic Act — parking regulations etc. — were heard at the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, and various fines were imposed.

Passenger for the St. John’s – Humbermouth route, will now leave St. John’s at five o’clock tomorrow afternoon, instead of today.

A special meeting of the Importers and Employers’ Association, will be held at the Board of Trade Rooms tonight, at 8.15. Business of importance is to be discussed.

In August just past, 3.190 dried tons of sulphite were produced at the new mill in Corner Brook. This averages 107.6 tons per operation day. The scheduled production calls for 100 tons per day or 30,000 tons per year. At the present rate, this total will be easily produced. — Western Star.

Five Canadian Soldiers were before Court yesterday, charged with being drunk and disorderly. The evidence was that when Constable O’Neill, in plain clothes, was getting out of a car at the top of Garrison Hill, they attempted to get into the car, and when told it was a private car, they still insisted, and one of them caught hold of the Constable and another hit the driver of the car. Another car that came along, went to the Central Barracks for assistance, with the result that Constables Gibbons and Mahar arrived, and the five solders were arrested. Fines of $3.00 and $5.00 were imposed"


October 4, 1941 THE FADING CLARET AND WHITE "Another War Veteran Passes.

“Their Souls at peace They rest content, For the sacred torch, they know is safe With the gallant hereos....”

The voice is robbed of speech but for a fleeting moment, yet it seems an age of centuries since we, the Sergeants’ Mess at Stob's Camp, in all the congenial atmosphere of the Sergeant’s Mess at Stob's Camp.

Today he is cold in death, and thus another link with the glorious past, of real comradeship and loyalty—of good nature and sympathy—is severed.

No. 757 Samuel G. Piercey, left our shores with the original “C” Company of the 1st Battalion. He was attached to the Transport Section in France and Belgium, under the late Stan Goodyear, and was one of the reliable men who always saw the rations reached the troops in the trenches.

He was for some time, in charge of the Canteen in the G.W.V.A. Building and was very popular with the boys. He was frank and open — a cheerful conversationalist and proud of his early brigade training.

His sudden passing came as a great shock to his many friends, but it is only another poignant reminder of the fading claret and white — the colours which should never be forgotten.

We hope that the attendance of ex-servicemen this afternoon, at the last obsequies, will be large and worthy of their late comrade. In these stirring days, acts of remembrance mean so very little, but are worth so very much to those who survive. With another War raging, we should be conscious more than ever, of the sacrifices made in 1914–1918, and the years after — but as Oxenham has put it in one of his short poems: – “Why Cloud today With fear of the sorrow That may or may not Come with the morrow.”

The memory of the Silent battalions will ever rest close to our hearts."

October 4, 1941 FUNERAL NOTICE The funeral of the late Samuel G. Piercey, Chief Steward, will take place from his late residence, 19 Boncloddy Street, today, Saturday, at 2.30 p.m.
October 4, 1941 DEATHS "COWLEY — Passed peacefully away last evening, after a short illness, borne with Christian resignation to the Divine Will, Anne Joseph Cowley, beloved wife of James F. Cowley; leaving to mourn, her husband, two sons, one daughter, four grandchildren, two brothers, and four sisters. Funeral tomorrow, Sunday, at 2.30 p.m., from her late residence, 41 Merrymeeting Road. Deceased was the eldest daughter of the late Captain James Burke of Brigus. May her soul rest in peace.

HEALE — Passed peacefully away 11 p.m., Oct 3rd, Samuel Thomas Heale, in his 67th year; leaving to mourn, wife, four sons, and one daughter, also 2 brothers, John in Ferrisburg, Vt., U.S.A., and James, Eastlake Farm, St. John’s East. Funeral on Sunday at 2.30 p.m., from his late residence, 45 Prince of Wales Street.

BARNABLE — Passed away on Thursday at 3.15 a.m., at General Hospital, Leone May, aged 21 years, daughter of Anne and the late John Barnable; leaving to mourn, mother, three sisters and one brother. Funeral tomorrow, Sunday, at 2.30 p.m. from her late residence, 25 Barron Street, “May the Sacred heart of Jesus have mercy on her soul”. — R.I.P."

October 4, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "Passengers for the St. John’s-Humbermouth service will leave St. John’s at 5 p.m. today.

The devotion of the Holy Hour was held last night at the R.C. Cathedral.

There was very heavy frost again last night and early this morning, and cars everywhere, as well as roofs, bore evidence of it after daylight.

Mr. William Collins, 55 Park St., Corner Brook, has announced the engagement of his daughter, Agnes Dorothy, to Mr. Ronald B. Taafe, son of Mrs. and the late William Taafe. – Western Star.

The Central and West End Fire Apparatus responded to an alarm yesterday, and proceeded to a house on Water Street West, where defective wiring caused a blaze. Very little damage was done.

A meeting of the S.P.A. will be held in the Council Chambers, City Hall, on Monday night.

The retail price of gasoline has advanced one cent in the city and is now 40 cents per gallon.

A man was before Court yesterday, charged with being drunk in charge of a car, and was fined $25.00 and his licence was suspended for six months.

At Pennywell Road, 470 feet concrete curb and gutter were laid during the past week and to date 850 feet have been laid on the North side.

The funeral of the late Leona Barnable, victim of the fatality which occurred on New Gower Street on Thursday morning, will take place tomorrow afternoon from her mother’s residence, Barron St.

The awning over the window of the Good View Café was on fire yesterday morning. The blaze was extinguished without calling the Fire Department. It is believed the cause was a lighted cigarette butt thrown on it.

In the Civil Court yesterday afternoon, a Farmer took action against the Nfld. Railway for the value of a cow, which was killed at White’s Crossing inside Bowring Park, on June 10th. The case was before Judge Browne and was not concluded.

At the magistrate’s Court, yesterday a truck driver, who formerly resided in the United States and is now employed at Fort Pepperell, was fined $20.00 and his licence was suspended for six months, after he was convicted of being drunk in charge of a truck. Evidence showed that in driving along Duckworth St. and New Gower St., he collided with a motor truck and a car."


October 6, 1941 WEDDING BELLS POWER — MORGAN: The marriage took place at Holy Cross Church, Holyrood, at 4 o’clock Sunday, by Rev. Fr. Murphy, of Mary (May) Morgan to Charles Power, both of Holyrood. Their many friends join in wishing them many years of future happiness.
October 6, 1941 OBITUARY "SAMUAL B. PIERCEY: The mortal remains of Samuel B. Pearcey were laid to rest Saturday afternoon last, in the peaceful Church of England Cemetery, by the Lakeside. “Sam” as he was affectionately known by his host of friends, has gone to give an account of his Stewardship to the Captain of his soul — Almighty God.

If was judged from human standards, then surely Sam has nothing to fear regarding the account of his Stewardship, because whilst holding here upon earth the position of a Chief Steward, his work as such was all that could be desired from any human being. Possessed of a very jovial, generous, and self-sacrificing disposition, he always discharged his earthly duties to human perfection. Those who have come in contact with him, will feel that this earth will be a sadder place because he is no longer here, but heaven we feel sure, glories in welcoming another great soul to the bosom of God.

Like the Prophet Samuel of Old, who when his Lord called, answered resignedly; “Speak Lord for thy servant heareth”, so our deceased namesake, when God called him to Himself, answered the summons resignedly and well prepared. He has finished his last long journey and has sailed with flying colours into the heavenly harbor, where the Captain of Captains has greeted him with the accounting words: “Give an account of thy Stewardship for now thou canst be Steward no longer”. We who have known Sam so Well in life, feel great comfort in realising, that after the accounting, came the inevitable rewarding words: “Well done thou good and faithful servant, enter thou into the joy of thy Lord.”

Deep sympathy is extended to his sorrowing sisters; Mrs. L. Bartlett, Mrs. J Morrissey, Mrs. E. Chafe, Mrs. F Phelan, Miss Maggie Piercey, and his brother, Mr. William Piercey.

“Eternal rest grant unto him, O Lord, and let perpetual light shine upon him.”

GEORGE KENT: Lance Cove, Bell Island. Again that immutable law that man must die, has claimed another life, in the spirit of George Kent, and Lance Cove, Bell Is., is poorer indeed, with the passing of one of its fine old respected citizens, of one of the fine old families, but, “After Life’s fitful fever, he sleeps well.”

George Kent was born in 1866, and a grandson of the second splendid Colonist of Lance Cove, Peter Kent, an Englishman, settling in Lance Cove in 1790. Of his generation, he left fine looking, stalwart, clever men, and not the last was George Kent, who died October 3rd.

Of this man it can be said, he was an ideal citizen, kind, industrious, and a good neighbour. He worked faithfully any well at the mines since its inception.

Alas it is, that of the older Colonial families, the third generation, who are quickly passing on. They enriched their birthplace with fine qualities that could be emulated with profit by the present generation. They wrought well in the days when this Colony was young, and laid the foundations of fine characters and homes.

Death has been busy in this family. Within six months, three of these brothers have gone on. The passing of this man leaves another blank in the history of this fine old settlement, Lance Cove, and his familiar cheery hail will long be missed.

Leaving to mourn him, are his widow (who is a great-grand-daughter of the first Irish settler on Bell Island, Captain William Dwyer, who settled on Bell Island in 1780, and now, a late contemporary of Gregory Normore, the first settler on Bell Island), and three sons, Rev. Brother Kent of St. Bonaventure’s College, George and John on Bell Island, and one daughter, Mrs. Ellard of Kelligrews. To all, the sympathy of the whole community is extended.

Of the early days on Bell Island, George Kent was a good chronicler, and was a fund of information to those who sought the date of his early days. Lance Cove, and Bell Island can ill afford the debt that death claims in the person of its fine old descendants of its first great settlers. Yet, it has its compensations. Death “scarfs up the troubled eye of care.”

May the sod of his birthplace lay lightly upon the mortal remains of the fine old man. F.F. JARDINE."

October 6, 1941 DEATHS "DWYER — Passed peacefully away after a long illness, Thomas J Dwyer, leaving to mourn wife, one son, James, one brother and four sisters. Funeral today at 2.30 p.m., from his late residence,18 Catherine Street. On whose soul Sweet Jesus, have mercy.

CROCKER — Passed away at 9.20 p.m. Sunday, Mrs. Maud Crocker, leaving to mourn three sons and one sister. Funeral today at 1.45 p.m. from her son’s residence, Head Constable E. Crocker, 1 Henry St. Interment at Petty Hr. via motor hearse.

GUSHUE — On Sunday, the 5th. October, George W. Gushue, in his 88th year. Funeral private at his own wish, at 8.50 o’clock this morning, from the residence of his sister, Mrs. K.S. Barnes, 129 LeMarchant Road.

WALSH — Passed Peacefully away at the Fever Hospital, Sunday, October 5th., of meningitis, Elizabeth (Betty) age 10 years, darling child of Mr. and Mrs. Michael Walsh, 31 LeMarchant Road; leaving to mourn, father and mother, five brothers, Raymond, Kevin, Cyril, Michael and Edward, serving with H.M. Royal Artillery, 3 sisters, Mary, Eileen and Gertrude, at home. Funeral from Fever Hospital today, Monday, at 2.30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances please accept this the only intimation. May the Sacred Heart of Jesus have mercy on her soul."


October 7, 1941 SURVIVORS GRATEFUL FOR KINDNESS SHOWN "Appreciate Attention Given in Hospital Here.

Mr. Albert Willamson of England, a survivor of the Mercantile Marine, was landed at St. John’s on Aug 13th. 1941, and taken to the General Hospital for medical treatment. A successful operation was performed by Dr. Rusted, and the patient has recovered from his grim experience. Mr. Williamson states that he will never forget the kind attention he received at the Hospital from Dr. Sharp and the Nursing staff. He deeply appreciated the visits of Mrs. Cameron, Mr. and Mrs. Hutchings, Mr. Donald Nicholson, and Mr. Ian Frazer, of the Toc. H. Rooms. His sincere gratitude goes out to Mrs. Roberts of Gower St. for the whole-hearted hospitality extended to him during his stay at her home.

Another member of the Mercantile Marine, Mr. Charles H. Firman, who recently received treatment at St. Clare’s Mercy Hospital, wishes to thank all who in any way did kind favours for him, visited him at the Hospital, used their professional skill and nursing care to restore him to health, and make the period of his illness bright and homelike, especially the following: — Dr. L. Conroy and nursing staff of the Hospital, Miss Furlong and Mr. R. Furlong of Winter Avenue, Miss F. Carr of Newcastle-on-Tyne, Mrs. George Crosbie, Mr. and Mrs. Clancy and family, miss B. Adams, Mr. F., Campbell Avenue, Mr. Donald Nicholson, Mr. Ian Frazer of the Toc. H. Rooms, staff of the Fuerness Withy Co., especially Miss Lindsay and Mr. A .Reid and also Mr. and Mrs. Roberts and family, in whose home he enjoyed a happy stay, surrounded by friendliness and hospitality .

Both gentlemen deeply appreciate all reference to survivors appearing from time to time in the Daily News, which thus enables fellow survivors to follow one another’s progress along the road to recovery.

Mr. Williamson’s address is: — 86 Garvary Road, Custom House, London, E. 16.

Mr. Firman’s address’s is: – Luggate Place, South Shields, England."

October 7, 1941 PERSONAL Mr. Paul Berty, representative of the Eastman Kodak Company of Ottawa, arrived by the express yesterday. He has visited Hospitals at Corner Brook and Grand Falls, and goes to Harbor Grace today. Whilst in St. John’s, he will inspect and advise on the photographic work at the city Hospitals.
October 7, 1941 DISCHARGED FROM ROYAL ARTILLERY "The following Newfoundlanders have been discharged from the Royal Artillery and arrived back in Newfoundland on September 27th, 1941:

Gnr. 971534, Stowe, Robert William, Bell Island, C.B.

Gnr. 971405, Tobin, James, Dunville, Placentia.

Gnr. 971353, Green, Chesley, Winterton, Trinity South.

Gnr. 970992, Lundrigan, John Arthur, 41 Long’s Hill, City.

Gnr. 970957, Skiffington, Michael Joseph, 5 Convent Square, City

Gnr. 970861, Mahar, Leo Francis, 25 Plymouth Road, City

Gnr. 971299, O’Neill, Peter Patrick, Valley Road, Southside Hill, City.

Gnr. 971163, House, Leslie, Seaward, Bellburns, Dist. St. Barbe.

Gnr. 971494, Collins, Adrian, Lamaline.

Gnr. 1075438 , Abbott, Naboth, Musgrave Harbor.

Gnr. 970744, Kearney, Gerald, 8 Lime Street, City.

Gnr. 971137, Thompson, Wm. Anthony, Freshwater Road, City.

Gnr. 971254, Mercer, William, 25 Calvert Ave., City.

Gnr. 971138, Barry , John Alfred, Corner Brook West."

October 7, 1941 OBITUARY "ALFRED E CANNING: After an illness of some months, Alfred Edward Canning, Superintendent of Bowring Park, entered into rest at 3.30 o’clock this morning, in his 65th. year. The deceased, who was born on May 8th 1877, son of William Stratford and Louisa (Penney) Canning, was educated at the Methodist College and Bishop Feild College. For many years he conducted a Nursery, and for the past twenty years he has been Superintendent of Bowring Park. He was a fellow of the Royal Horticultural Society of Great Britain and a Fellow of the America Institute Parks and Recreation. He was a member of the Masonic Order.

He is survived by his widow, nee Florence Brown, and by a twin brother, William F.

MRS. ANNIE STRAFFORD: Mrs. Annie Strafford, widow of John Strafford, passed away on Sunday, September 21st., at the residence of her son-in-law, Major W.H. Hillier, Wellington St. N., Hamilton, Ont., at the age of 94 years. Her death followed a brief illness. Mrs. Strafford was born in Harbor Grace, and for a number of years, resided in St. John’s, then later she moved to Philadelphia, Pa., U.S.A., and resided with her son for a while. Returning to Canada, she lived with her daughter until her death.

Surviving are one son, Major J Stafford of Cleveland, Ohio, and a daughter, Mrs. Major W.H. Hillier, Hamilton, Ont., with whom she resided. Two grand-daughters, Miss Ida Starfford of New York, and Miss Ruby Strafford, of Cleveland, Ohio.

Her sister, Mrs. Andrea Blackwood, and step-sister Mrs. Edwin Whiteway, of St. John’s, and her step-brother John Trapp, of Hr. Grace, pre-deceased her. The funeral service was conducted by Lieut. Colonel H. Ritcie, assisted by Brigadier E. Owen, and Major G. Earle. Pallbearers were: Brigadier, E. Owen, Majors J. Mercer, J.Wiseman, R. Thierstein, A. Crowe, and A. Whitefield.

Interment took place in Woodland Cemetery, Hamilton, Ont."

October 7, 1941 ACKNOWLEDGMENT The Sisters of Mercy, Belvedere Orphanage, beg to acknowledge receipt of $55.00, from the parishioners of St. Raphael’s Church, Mount Cashel, per Rev. T.J. Bride, P.P.
October 7, 1941 MARRIAGE "MOORES — BROWN: July 28th, 1941, at the Yarmouth Parish Church, by the Vicar Canon Aitken, William Thomas, younger son of Mrs. and the late Mr. William C. Moores, of Carbonear, Newfoundland, to Vera Alice, elder daughter, of Mr. and Mrs. J.E. Brown, of Fleggburgh, late of Yarmouth.

MURRAY — The Bell Islander states “His many friends on Bell Island have learned with pleasure of the Marriage in England of Gunner Myles Murray, who is serving with the Royal Newfoundland Artillery. BURKE—BOONE: A quiet but pretty wedding, was solemnized at Botwood on September 25th, when Miss Sadie Burke of Victoria, Carbonear, was married to Mr. Donald Boone, son of Mr. and Mrs. Peter Boone of Botwood. The Rev. H.G. Copin officiated, the ceremony taking place at the Manse. — Grand Falls Advertiser."

October 7, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "The Grand Jury has been summoned to attend at the Supreme Court today. It is probable they will be asked to consider three bills of indictment.

The ice dance held at the Arena last night, was well attended and enjoyed to the full. Mickey Duggan’s orchestra provided the music.

A general meeting of the St. John’s Players will be held at eight o’clock tonight, at the Memorial University College.

Two men who were arrested on Sunday for fighting near the Post Office, were fined $5.00 each at the Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

The express this evening, will make connection at Lewisporte for the St. John’s-Lewisporte service.

Jennie Martin, the girl who was arrested for ringing in a false fire alarm, early Sunday morning, appeared before the Magistrate’s Court yesterday and was convicted of the charge. She was fined $50.00 or six weeks imprisonment.

A special train leaving at 5.30 this morning, makes connection at Argentia for the Western route of Placentia Bay.

The Overland Limited this afternoon, will leave in two sections. First and second class passengers will leave at six o’clock and sleeping car passengers at 6.20 p.m.

The Bell Islander states that Mr. and Mrs. William Hibbs of Portugal Cove celebrated their 45th wedding anniversary last Tuesday. Their many friend will join in extending congratulations.

A Truckman was before Court yesterday, charged with a breach of the Alcoholic Liquors Act. He was find $10.00. When arrested, the man had on his person $916.40. He assured Judge Browne he would invest the money in War Saving Certificates.

Further reduction is shown in flower prices this week. Beef moved up another $1 per barrel. Sugar is 30 cents a sack higher. Rolled oats and all feeds are still advancing. Hay is up $4.00 a ton to $43. — Newfoundland Trade Review.

The Trade Review on Saturday’s date states, “Nova Scotia Gravenstein Apples” arrived this week Prices are as we expected, quite reasonable. Wholesale prices are $4.25 per barrel for quarters to halves, and $4.50 per barrel halves up. Retailers are selling at 20 to 25 cents per dozen.

The Town Square branch of James Baird, Ltd., was removed this week to a new site across the street, and is now located in the store formerly occupied by Mr. D. Feder. Their new stand is much larger than their former place of business. They opened up the new place on Thursday morning. — The Bell Islander. The Ladies’ Aid Society of Wesley United Church, will hold its annual sale of work, tea and concert, on Wednesday and Thursday of this week. Lady Walwyn has kindly consented to open the sale at 4.30 p.m. Wednesday. A concert and sociable will be held on Thursday night."


October 8, 1941 AGREEMENT NOW ONE YEAR OLD "Anniversary of Arrival First Americans. On September 2nd of last year, negotiations between the Government of the United Kingdom and of the United States were concluded, for the acquisition by the latter, of Naval and Air Bases in Newfoundland, amongst other parts of the Empire, in the Western Hemisphere.

Subsequent to this agreement, on October 11th of last year, 35 members of the United States Corps of Engineers arrived in St. John’s, and of these, 12 are still here and carrying on their work, and are Col. P.G. Burton, C.E. District Engineer; Captain Wright Hiatt, C.E., Chief of the Engineering Division; Mr. Arthur W. Jackson, Chief Administration Assistant; Mr. Samuel G. Neff, Senior Engineer of the Operation Division; and Messrs H.A. Preston, W.C. Iseminger, T.H. Bolles, Charles Saver, D.K. Joselyn, H.A. Kadijan, C.J. Wittman, and C.P. Oakely.

On Saturday night next, October 11th., the first anniversary of the arrival of the vanguard of those to take part in the construction projects for the United States Government, a dance sponsored by the Quidi Vidi Club, will be held at Fort Pepperrell."

October 8, 1941 CASUALITES IN THE NAVY "The Trade Commissioner for Newfoundland in London, England, has informed the Secretary for Defence, Lieut Col W.F. Rendell of the following Newfoundland casualties: —

WARHAM, Douglas, Seaman JX195264 killed in air raid on Northshields September 30th, 1941, next of kin, Mother, Mrs. Thomas Wareham, Salmon Cove, Bay de Verde, Newfoundland.

HEWLIN, Llewellyn, Seaman JX 2200933, missing in air raid on Northshields, September 30th, 1941. Next of kin, wife, Mrs. M. Hewlin.

FRANCIS, Harold Douglas D., Seaman, Lt/JX 242285 injured in air raid on Northshields, September 30th, 1941. His condition gives rise to no anxiety. Next of kin, Father, Mr. Robert Francis, Demonstration Farm, Mount Pearl, St. John’s West, Newfoundland."

October 8, 1941 WEDDING BELLS "MACDONALD — LEAHEY: A quiet wedding took place in St. Patrick’s Church Rectory at ten o’clock on Saturday morning, September 27th, when Catherine Jean, elder daughter of Mr and Mrs. H.C. MacDonald, of Stellarton N.S., was united in marriage to Mr. James Leahey, of Montreal, son of the late James A Leahey, of St. John’s, Newfoundland, and of Mrs. Leahey, Rev. Father Moyle officiating.

Miss Naomi MacDonald of Stellarton was her sister’s only attendant, and Mr. Fred Leahey was best man for his brother.

The bride wore a rose coloured jacket dress of French wool with black accessories and carried a nosegay of shaded chrysanthemums and Joanna Hill Roses. The bridesmaid was wearing a French wool dress of moss green with brown accessories and a corsage cluster of yellow carnations.

After a few days spent in the Laurentian’s followed by a trip to Ottawa and Quebec, the newly wedded couple will live in Montreal. The bride wore for travelling, a Margaret Rose plaid tartan suit with glengarry to match.

The bride is a graduate of the Royal Victoria Hospital and Mr. Leahey, of the Faculty of Engineering of McGill University — Morning Star."

October 8, 1941 OBITUARY "MRS. PATRICK MORRISSEY: There passed to her eternal reward at Holyrood, C. Bay, on Sept. 9th, one of its oldest and most highly respected citizens, in the person of Mary Flannigan, widow of the late Patrick Morrissey, in her 95th year. Possessed of a kind and cheerful disposition, she endeared herself to all who had the great pleasure of her acquaintance, and who now mourn the lost of a very dear friend.

Visitors to her home were always welcome most cordially, and delighted to listen to the many tales of “Ye Olden times” as told by this grand old lady of Holyrood. During her illness she was attended by the devoted Pastor, Rev. Fr. Murphy P.P., who administered the Rites of Holy Mother Church, and also recited the Rosary at her obsequities.

She was of the grand old stock, whose grandfather came to this Country from Tipperary, Ireland.

One son Michael, was killed in New York City, U.S.A., while engaged at iron construction work, Sept. 9th 1926. Her husband also predeceased her 15 years ago. Her funeral took place Thursday, Sept. 11th. after Requiem Mass, at Holy Cross Cemetery, South Side Holyrood, where all that was mortal of this venerable old lady was laid to rest in the family plot.

Mr. Michael Dumphy had charge of the funeral which was largely attended, and a beautiful floral tribute, sent by the office staff of the American Base Fort Pepperrell, adorned the casket. Left to mourn are one son, Patrick of the American Base, Fort Pepperrell, four daughters, Mrs.Nicholas Brien, of Gloucester, Mass., Mrs Sebastian Boland, Margaret and Hannah at home, also several grand children and one great grandchild, to all of whom the writer extends deepest sympathy. “May her soul rest in peace.” S.J.C."

October 8, 1941 DEATHS TESSIER — On Monday afternoon, C. Germon Tessier, eldest son of Bertha M. and the late Chas. W.H. Tessier, passed peacefully away. Funeral by motor hearse this Wednesday at 2.30 p.m., from his late residence, No. 4 Hollett Place. (off Pleasant Street)
October 8, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "A meeting of the Newfoundland Auxiliary of the British and Foreign Bible Society in Canada, will be held in the Pitts Memorial Hall on Sunday, October 12th, at 8.15 p.m. The speaker will be Rev. J.B. Armour, B.A., General Secretary. The proceedings will be broadcast.

The five boys who were arrested early yesterday morning, charged with breaking and entering the Central Trucking Office, Bishop’s Cove, were before the Juvenile Court yesterday. Evidence showed that the Police were attracted to the place, when they saw sparks coming from the chimney, and when they entered the boys were huddle around the stove. Nothing was taken from the premises. Two of them were ordered to sign bonds in the sum of $25.00, and the other three were kept locked up till yesterday afternoon.

It was very cold last night and frost was seen very early. At nine o’clock the thermometer at the corner of Alelaide Street registered at the freezing point.

A meeting of the Truckmen’s Union was held last night at the L.S.P.U. Hall, for the purpose of nominating officers for the coming year.

A number of Sportsmen who were able to get on the barrens for a day or so, have made arrangements to go out this afternoon, and they hope the weather will be fine for the half day.

A general meeting of the Regatta Committee will be held at the City Hall on Friday night, for the purpose of finalizing all matters in connection with the past season.

A meeting of the ladies and gentlemen of the St. Patrick’s Hall Field Day Committee, will be held at the O’Hurley Memorial Room, St. Patrick’s Hall, on tomorrow night at eight o’clock, for the purpose of discussing the proposed “Country Store.”

A series of weekly auctions for the [?] fives tournaments, will be held in the card room at the Masonic Temple between now and the Christmas season. The first in the series will be held tonight at eight o’clock sharp. Members of the fraternity may bring their friends.

The delayed express will leave St. John’s today in two sections. All first and second class passengers will leave at 11 a.m. and the sleeping car passengers will leave at 11.20 a.m. Baggage will not be checked after 10.45 a.m. This change of time applies for the above mentioned train only. The regular express train will leave Thursday as usual.

In the United Church School, Bishop’s Falls, last week, the United Church Sunday School and Trail Rangers gave a farwell party to Bruce Petrie, son of Mr. and Mrs. J.A. Petrie, who is leaving to join the R.A.F., this being the fourth son to offer his service for active service. The others, Bob and Bert, are overseas, George volunteered but did not pass. – Grand Falls Advertiser.

The interior of the R.C. Cathedral at Grand Falls, has recently been redecorated, and now presents a still more pleasing appearance. The cold white of the walls have been replaced with a warm cream colour, and the ceiling has been retouched with white, gold, and the palest blue. The effect is quite beautiful and the congregation is loud in its praise of the splendid piece of work planned by the Pastor, Rev. Father Finn, P.P., and executed by his workmen. – Grand Falls Advertiser."


October 9, 1941 OBITUARY "HENRY BECKFORD: Lance Cove, Bell Island. Within a week, death has been busy amongst the older generation of the pioneer families of Bell Island. Today we have to mark on the roll of pioneer families, the name of Henry Beckford as “absent”. This fine old man was of the first generation of the Beckford family. He had reached the age of 76, was of a vigorous type of Colonist, and worked on the mine up to last summer. He was a most unassuming, kindly man, and was held in great respect by the community of Lance Cove.

This man was the son of the first Henry Beckford, a West Country Englishman, a Soldier. He later became a Warden at the Penitentiary in St. John’s. During his term as Warden, he was sent to Bell Island in charge of a detachment of prisoners, to do some public work in 1851. The people on the Beach were then beginning to move up to the land they had cleared on the top of the island, and a road of sorts was built. Under the superintendence of Henry Beckford, a retaining wall under the cliffside was built. So well was the work done, that it remains today, and down the years has had but little repairs. In the meantime, Henry Beckford had taken land at Lance Cove and settled there permanently. This first Henry Beckford was a sterling character, and was held in great esteem by the first old settlers.

This second Henry Beckford followed the trail of his father, and was a very fine type of citizen. Henry Beckford severs the link of the first generation of the Beckford family. He leaves to mourn his passing, a large family. Besides his widow, he leaves 6 daughter, Mrs. E. Parsons, P. Coxworthy, Mrs. F. Hammond, Mrs. C. Picco, Mrs. B. Parsons, Mrs. J. Parsons and 2 sons Joseph and Edward. To all of whom, the sympathy of Bell Island is extended. F.F. JARDINE."

October 9, 1941 PERSONAL "Rev. Alfred Woods leaves by today’s express for Boston, U.S.A., where he will visit relatives and friends at Long Island, New York, and other places, chiefly in Massachusetts, where during his long Ministry, he was appointed to twenty pastoral charges in that State. He has been invited to be present as a guest of honour, at an anniversary celebration of a Church, whose Pastor he was, some sixty years ago. Rev. Woods, who passed his ninety-fourth milestone in August, is enjoying good health, and looks forward with keen anticipation to meeting once again the friends of other days.

Mr. George Brown of Bell Island was in the city on business yesterday.

Mr. and Mrs. H.P. Skanes arrived in town on Tuesday night for a short visit."

October 9, 1941 ODDITIES "On the side of the moon visible from the earth, there are 10 mountain ranges.

The 1934 mining disaster of Gresford, England, left 200 widows and 800 orphans.

Exactly 115 nails were removed from the stomach of a man who underwent an operation in Dublin .

There are 3070 counties in the United States.

A body weighing 100 pounds on earth would weigh only 38 on Mars and 82 on Venus.

Eyes of children do not move in unison until three months after birth."


October 10, 1941 CO-OP TO BE LOCATED IN COLONIAL BUILDING Changes make for Increased Efficiency> The Co-operative division of the Department of Natural Resources, which has had its offices in the Law Chambers for the past two years, will now be moved to the Colonial Building, a News Reporter was told by Hon. P.D.H. Dunn, Commissioner for Natural Resources. This, with possibly other changes, will make for increased efficiency in the working of the Department. Mr. McEachern and Mr. McNeill of the Co-operative Division will occupy the office at present occupied by Mr. A, Hearn, Fishery Officer.
October 10, 1941 CODFISH STOCKS "A statement of stocks of salt codfish, declared by licenced exporters as being in hand 30th. September last, was released yesterday by the Statistical Division of the Newfoundland Fishery Board, and showed a grand total of 212,475 quintals, as against 281,065 quintals at the same date last year.

Stocks at the end of last month, were made up of 131,714 quintals of Shore, 37,920 quintals of Bank, and 42,841 quintals of Labrador and Newfoundland Soft Cure, but included under the last heading are 17,555 quintals of Bank and Shore Cured Labrador Style.

Stocks at the end of September 1940, were 281,065 quintals made up at 157,380 quintals of Shore, 62,376 quintals of Bank and 61,309 quintals of Labrador and Newfoundland Soft Cure."

October 10, 1941 PERSONAL Capt. Thomas Hollett of the firm Hollett and Sons, Burin, is at present in the city on business. Mrs. Curtis, wife of the Rev. Dr. I Curtis of Corner Brook, arrived yesterday to spend a few days in the city. Mr. Thomas Roberts of the city, recently entered St. Clare’s Mercy Hospital for medical treatment. His friends will be pleased to know that Mr. Robert’s illness is not of a serious nature.
October 10, 1941 MEMORIAL TO MEN JERVIS BAY IS UNVEILED. "SAINT JOHN, N.B. Oct 4 — Tribute to the Heroism of Officers and men of the H.M.S. Jervis Bay, armed Merchant Cruiser, lost in defending a convoy last November, was left to posterity today, in the form of a 12 foot memorial unveiled at East Saint John.

“Captain Fogarty Fegen laid down his own life, that of his ship, and many of his men, in fulfilment of the Nelson Signal, that England expects evert man to do his duty”, said Chief Justice J.B.M. Baxter, in delivering the address at the ceremony.

Posthumous award of the Victoria Cross to Captain Fegen would, “Doubtless be the inspiration of countless men in their determination to do their duty to God, King, and Motherland,” he said.

The prayer of dedication was given by Rev. H.H. Hoyt, Port Naval Chaplain, Miss Adine unveiled the memorial. Flowers were deposited by Lieut J.G. Sargent, a survivor of the Jarvis Bay. The monument, obtained by public subscription, stands on the grounds of Saint John Tuberculosis Hospital, opposite the spot where the Jarvis Bay underwent reconditioning, in the summer of 1940.

The six-ton memorial shaft is of gray granite, nine feet high, on a base of three tiers. A plaque records the Jarvis Bay’s heroic action."

October 10, 1941 WEDDING BELLS "LAWSON — CHRISTIAN: The marriage of Miss Charlotte Isabelle Lawson to Mr. Charles Pierson Christian, both of Toronto, Canada, took place at St. Thomas’s, the Old Garrison Church, at 8.30 p.m. on Monday, October 6th., the ceremony being performed by the Rev. J.T. Rhodes. The Church was beautifully decorated for the occasion with multi-coloured autumn flowers.

Mr. H.W. Stirling officiated at the organ, and as the strains of the Bridal Chorus pealed forth, the bride, looking very charming in a gown of coral French wool crepe, with black sweetheart hat and black accessories, and corsage of shaded gladiola and fern, entered the Church on the arm of Mr. Arthur H. Wilde, of Toronto, who gave her in marriage. She was attended by Miss Alyce Y. Saunders of St. John’s, as bridesmaid, who wore wool crepe gown of Lilyheart green, with brown hat and accessories, and corsage of flame gladiola and fern. Mr. R. Fred Porter, Jr. of Montreal, ably performed the duties of best man. During the signing of the Register, a solo, “O Promise Me, “ was charmingly rendered by Miss Joan Gear.

Following the ceremony, the bridal party, together with their guests, motored to the residence of Mr. Wilde, City Terrace, where a reception was held, and the usual toast list duly honoured, after which Mr. and Mrs. Christian left for Brigus, where the honeymoon is being spent."


October 13, 1941 DEATHS OSMOND — Passed peacefully away Oct. 11th, Robert Davison Osmond, aged 63 years. He leaves to mourn, three daughters and four sons, also two sisters and two brothers. Funeral today, Monday, at 2.30 p.m., from his son’s residence, Blackmarsh Road.
October 13, 1941 WEDDING BELLS "BELLOW — PYE: The School Chapel at Cape Charles, Labrador, was the scene of a very pretty wedding on September 14th., when Viola, daughter of Maria and the late Kenneth Bellow of Mount Moriah, Bay of Islands, was united in the holy bonds of matrimony to Cecil Pye, son of Mr. and Mrs. L. Pye of Cape Charles. The ceremony was performed by Rev. A.W. Fudge. — Western Star.

BENNETT — SPENCER: A very pretty wedding was solemnized at the Church of John the Evangelist at Corner Brook, on the evening of September 21st., when Mary Elizabeth Bennett of Nova Scotia, was united in matrimony to John Gilliam Spencer of Port au Basques. The ceremony was performed by Rev. T.E. Loder. – Western Star."

October 13, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "The annual, Natives vs. All-Comers match and dinner, will be held at Bally Haly on Wednesday.

The Kinsmen Dance will be held at the Newfoundland Hotel on Tuesday night. Music will be provided by the Rhythm Kings Orchestra.

Until the coming of the rubber overshoes season, the Arena has decided to discontinue ice dances. At the present time, skating is more popular than dancing, on the ice.

The man who was arrested on Thursday night, and appeared before Court on Friday, charged with sending in a false alarm, was again up on Saturday, when he was convicted and fined $20.00.

Messrs. D. Pinsent, J. Nurse, and R. Bartlett, have successfully passed law exams. Mr. Pinsent completed second intermediate exams, and Messrs Nurse and Bartlett, first intermediate. Their many friends are extending congratulation.

A female resident appeared before Magistrate Mulcahy, and was charged with fraudulently cashing three old age pension cheques, to the value of $40, belonging to another woman. She pleaded guilty and was fined $40. The fine was paid. — The Bell Islander.

One of the crew of the schooner Nantucket, met with a painful accident on Thursday afternoon, while discharging feed at the Dominion Pier. He lost the tips of two of his fingers by getting them caught in the winch. He was treated by Dr. Crummey and taken to Hospital in the city. – The Bell Islander.

An unusual thing occurred this week, when there was a shortage of men at the pier for a time, to discharge a cargo of dynamite. Before the war, there was no scarcity of men to do Longshore work here, but the absence of many young men overseas, and the large number working on the Bases, have made a scarcity of labour. — The Bell Islander.

As a result of Saturday’s rainstorm, some of the dirt roads outside of St. John’s, are in worse condition than ever with potholes washed out. Typical of this, is the Torbay Road from inside the new road to Torbay and through it. This was bad all the year, but now it is in almost impassable condition, and a danger to man, beast, and vehicle.

Passengers for the South Coast and Fortune Bay route did not leave on Saturday, but will do so at noon today.

The Fireman were called to Water Street West on Saturday morning. A fire was in progress in a building used by the U.S. authorities. It had been caused by an electric motor. Not much damage was done to the building, through the motor was damaged.

The Twillingate Sun says, “Sellers of used stamps (or any kind) are advised not to sell their stamps, unless cash is paid in advance. Only this month, a seller was fleeced out of thirty dollars worth of stamps sent to the House of Stamps at Toronto. The party cannot be located, who is playing the fraud, because the idea is to switch to a new address under another name, after so much business is done, and before such a party is caught by the authorities.

Some days ago, the News reported that Thomas Johnston of Northern Bay, had been picked up near Halliday’s Farm, in a badly beaten condition, and when taken to the Police Station, reported that he had been assaulted and robbed of more than $90.00 by two women. On Saturday, a thirty-six year old woman, whose home is on Purcell’s Ridge, and a nineteen year old girl, who lives in the three Pond Barrens, were before Court and were charged with robbery with violence. They were remanded.

Berry picking at Catalina continues in spite of bad weather, and the price remains at thirty cents per gallon. Partridge berries are plentiful, and it is common for a family to have picked several barrels. Blue berries are scarce. There are none on the near barrens, though sportsmen report finding small patches further inland on the high barrens. There will be no blueberry jam this year, while the plenteous season of Fall and the festive season of Christmas, will lack the warm baccnanalian hospitality provided by Blueberry wine. — Fishermen’s Advocate. "


October 14, 1941 WEDDING BELLS "BURT — FRENCH: BIRCHY BAY, N.D.B., Oct 5 — On Friday, October 3, 1941, at 7 p.m. in the United Church at Birchy Bay, Rev. Reuben Davis united in holy bonds of matrimony, Edna, younger daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. French of Birchy Bay, to Mr. George Burt of Elliston, Trinity Bay.

The bride looked beautiful in a bridal gown of white satin and long veil, with wreath of orange blossoms. She carried a bunch of white roses. Mrs. Oliver Hooper, sister of the bride, and Miss Norma Martin, acted as bridesgirls. Mrs. Hooper was gracefully attired in ankle length white satin, Miss Martin wore ankle length blue satin. Mr. Oliver Hooper, brother-in-law of the bride, and Mr. Ernest French, acted as bridesboys.

At 8 p.m., a reception was held at the home of the bride, where about fifty guests were entertained. The bride and groom were the recipients of many valuable gifts.

On Sunday, October 5th, 1941, the bride and groom left for the groom’s home at Elliston, where the happy couple will spend a short honeymoon, after which the bride will return to Birchy Bay and the groom will return to Canada to resume duty in the Royal Navy, where he is now serving.

The writer joins with many friends in wishing the groom a speedy return to Newfoundland, and also wishing Mr. and Mrs. Burt many years of happiness. A GUEST"

October 14, 1941 ANNOUNCEMENT HUMBER — HUNTER: The marriage of Miss Bertha M. Humber of Grand Falls, and Mr. John Macintosh Hunter, will take place on Friday, the 17th October 1941, at George Street United Church Manse.
October 14, 1941 PERSONAL "Mr. Simeon Culmore of the staff of the Newfoundland Fisheries Board, celebrates his birthday today.

Mr. Sheppard, J.P., of Harbor Grace, who had an operation at the General Hospital a while ago, left for home yesterday feeling fine.

Mr. C.G. Manuel left for his home at Bonavista on Sunday, after having spent a week in the city on business.

Mr. Kent of Bell Island, came to the city a few days ago to visit his wife, who is a patient at St. Clare’s Hospital. Mrs. Kent’s many friends will be pleased to hear that she is improving satisfactorily.

Mr. C.H. Kobelt, who has been visiting his two sons attached to the military forces at St. John’s, left the city on Sunday for his home at Montreal, Quebec.

Mr. C.R. Newhook of Jackson’s Cove, is spending a few days in the city on business.

Mr. and Mrs. A.N. Antle of Botwood arrived in the city by yesterday’s express.

Mr. S Simon, of the Engineering staff of the A.N.D. Co., Botwood, is in town on a vacation."

October 14, 1941 OBITUARY "FRANCIS P. NEVILLE: “To us it seemed his life was too soon done, Ended indeed, whilst scarcely yet begun. God in His wiser vision knew that he was fitted for eternity.”

The news of the passing of Francis P. Neville at New York on September 21st., came as a distinct shock to his may friends in this city. Until the week proceeding his death, he had been in the best of health, but a slight cold, unchecked at the beginning, developed into pneumonia, and after a struggle of only five days duration, death claimed its toll.

To those who were intimately associated with Frank Neville, in the old days at Holy Cross, the announcement of his death brought a definite sense of loss, for few were more widely know or more universally esteemed, than he. It brought back vividly, recollections of his prowess on the famous Holy Cross football team of 1921, it brought back too, pleasant memories of his rich tenor voice, so often heard on the concert stages of St. John’s, and so constantly at the disposal of every undertaking in the cause of Church and Charity.

The son of Mrs. Mary and the late John Neville, the deceased left for the United States some fifteen years ago, and up to the time of his death, had been a faithful and trusted employee of the Bethlehem Steel Co. at Brooklyn, N.Y.

Two years ago, he paid a brief visit to St. John’s, and the occasion afforded many the opportunity of renewing an old and very dear friendship, and of enjoying once more, the company of one who was at all times, and in all things, a truly Christian gentleman.

Left to mourn his passing, are a loving wife, (nee Henrietta Meehan of Springfield ,Mass.) and a little son, also his mother, Mrs. Mary Neville of this city, three brothers, Peter J., of South Boston, Augustine of Bronx, N.Y., and Ted at home, and three sisters, Madeline (Mrs. Ralph Burt) of Brooklyn, and Helen and Mary at home.

Interment took place in the family plot of his wife's family at Springfield, Mass.

He sleeps far from his native land, but the thoughts are prayers of his friends are forever with him. Eternal rest grant upon him, O Lord, And let perpetual light shine upon him.”"

October 14, 1941 WEDDING BELLS "HOLDEN — PENNEY: On Wednesday, October 8th, the wedding took place at Corpus Christi Church, of Mary, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Penney of Holyrood, to Thomas, son of Mr. and Mrs. Michael Holden of Topsail Road.

The bride looked very pretty in a wine ensemble trimmed with red fox, with hat to match, and carried a bouquet of Carnations and fern. The bride’s sister, Edith, was bridesmaid, and wore a dress of air force blue with matching hat. The groom was attended by his brother John.

After the ceremony, dinner was served at the groom’s home, after which the bride and groom left for Holyrood, where the honeymoon was spent. We wish them both every happiness in the future."

October 14, 1941 DEATHS RYAN — Passed peacefully away at 9.30 yesterday morning, Joseph P. Ryan, son of the late John Ryan, (Shipwright) aged 67 years; leaving to mourn a wife, 5 daughters and 2 sons, also 1 brother and 3 sisters. Funeral at 2.30 p.m. on Thursday, from his residence, 315 Water Street West. R.I.P.
October 14, 1941 MARRIAGES HOLDEN – PENNEY: On October 8th, at Corpus Christi Church, Kilbride, Mary, eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Penney of Holyrood, to Thomas, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Michael Holden, Topsail Road. The ceremony was performed by Rt. Rev. Msgr. J.J. Rawlins.
October 14, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "The crew of the sealing ship Terra Nova were paid off yesterday. The ship has made a few trips but will now lie up till the sealing voyage.

Mickey Duggan’s Orchestra will be in attendance at the Yacht Club tomorrow night. This will be the third last event at the club for this season.

There will be dancing at Club Hamilton tonight from 8.30 to 12.30. Walter Chambers and his orchestra will be in attendance. This will be for members and their friends. No stag parties will be permitted.

The Catalina Correspondent of the Fishermen’s Advocate stated, that so far, the appeal for partridge berries for the library has met with little response. This may be due partly to bad weather conditions and partly to the lack of a sense of responsibility on the part of the public. It is hoped that when the next fine day comes, the teachers will take the children in the woods for an afternoon picking.

A Steward from Calgary and a Sailor from Ontario, were before the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, charged with stealing a motor car, and on being convicted they were fined $50.00 each. The evidence was that the car was stolen from the Waldegrave Taxi Stand, about three o’clock on Sunday morning. It was found about two hours later near Kane’s Valley. It was in a ditch, and damage to the extent of about $300.00 was done. The men were arrested on Cornwall Avenue, and mud on their clothes corresponded to mud in the ditch and on the car.

A card tournament was held at the C.E.I. Club Rooms last night, for men only. It was well attended and enjoyed to the full.

There is still a fair amount of codfish around the North shore of Bonavista Bay but the weather has been so bad, that seldom can the fishermen get out to secure any.

The express leaving this afternoon will be in two sections. First and second class passengers will leave at 6 p.m. and sleeping car passengers at 6.20 p.m.

Upward movement continues in wholesale prices. Spare ribs already unusually high and a cent a pound up. Rolled oats at $41.50 per barrel. Cheese is five, feed oats are 25 to 35 cents higher. Raisins advanced one cent per pound. — Trade Review.

An enquiry is now being conducted before Magistrate Mulcahy, into the cause of the fire which destroyed the premises of Elias Basha. — The Bell Islander"

October 14, 1941 DEATHS "Two aged residents of Bell Island passed away last week, in the person of Mr. Henry T. PECKION aged 75 years, and Mr. Frank HEALEY, aged 86.

An American truck driver was before Court yesterday, charged with being drunk in charge of a truck. He was fined $25.00 and his licence was suspended for six months.

During the past fortnight, special room for conveyance of patients going to and from Hospital, has been fitted up on the Maneco. This was done by taking part of the space in the last cabin. The new Hospital cabin is large enough to take a stretcher, and patients are now private when on board the ferry. — The Bell Islander.

The Nfld. Automobile Association is considering the regulations governing the parking of vehicles on Water, Duckworth, and New Gower Streets, and plans holding a meeting of the executive of the Association on Friday night to go into the matter. They are asking members or interest motorists, who have the desire to express an opinion, preferably with alternatives suggestions, to forward same to Secretary of the Association before noon on Saturday.

Constable Harvey informed the Chief of Police yesterday, that a wrecked motor boat with the name “Lois” was picked up at Hare Bay last week. In the boat were a propeller and a muffler.

The Magisterial Enquiry into the cause of the death of the child Rossiter, which occurred on New Gower Street in August last, was continued yesterday afternoon before Magistrate O’Neill. Assistant Chief of Police, Strange, conducted the enquiry. It will probably conclude tomorrow afternoon."


October 16, 1941 WEDDING BELLS "GREEN — COSTELLO: AVONDALE Oct. 12 — The marriage took place at 7 o’clock Tuesday morning Sept. 29th., at Nuptial High Mass at Holy Redeemer Church, Cecilia Costello, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Costello of Avondale, to John Robert Green of the Merchant Marine. Rev. Fr. R. Coffin officiated at the ceremony.

The bride wore a conventional bridal costume of white chiffon with bridal veil, caught with orange blossoms. Her bouquet was of coral gladioli and baby’s breath. She also carried a while Prayer Book.

Her only sister, Mrs. Michael Devereaux, was matron of honour. She wore a gown of dusky rose with white accessories, and carried a bouquet of gladioli. The groom was attended by Mr. Michael Devereaux.

A wedding breakfast was held after the ceremony, and last night, a wedding supper was tendered the bride and groom at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Michael Devereaux. About seventy five guests were present, including members of the crew, of which Mr. Green is Second Mate. The groom presented cheques to the bride and her attendants.

Mrs. Devereaux, who was hostess to the wedding party, and her husband, were former favourites of Avondale, Nfld. They made their home at Sydney, Cape Breton, many years ago, and now, as the above ceremony discloses, and an account of which has appeared in a leading newspaper of Sydney, Cape Breton, another member of the fair sex of our town has fallen victim to Cupid’s piercing arrow, in the city of her sister’s adoption.

Her numerous well wishers at home, will accord Mr. and Mrs. Green a long and joyous passage across the matrimonial sea. A FRIEND.

CRANE — ROBERTS: The marriage of Ruby May Cartwright, daughter of Mr. J.H. Roberts and William Heber Crane, was solemnized at Woodstock, Topsail, Wednesday, October 15th at 8 p.m., Rev. Dr. Burns, Minister of Gower Street United Church, officiating.

The bride looked charming in a gown of white satin and lace, cut on princess lines, with a long lace train, caught at the head with a tiara of lily of the valley. She carried a bouquet of heather, received from Scotland, together with gladioli, and was given in marriage by her father. She was attended by her sister, Gladys, who wore a frock of turquoise blue moire and carried a muff of the same material, interspersed with sweet peas. Her sister, Mrs. Marie Giannou, was matron of honour, and wore a gown of pale pink chiffon and carried a bouquet of flame coloured gladioli. Miss Elizabeth Ann Lindsay, of Bell Island, was junior attendant, and wore a frock of yellow shorteakin, trimmed with violet ribbon, and carried a nosegay of variegated roses. The groom’s sister was dressed in teal blue, with matching accessories, and wore a corsage of deep pink carnations. The duties of best man were performed by Mr. E.A. House, whilst Messrs. George Giannou and Carmen Mews were ushers.

During the signing of the Register, Mr. Kevin Osmond sang, “O promise Me” and was accompanied by Mr. W.E. Curtis, A.R.C.O., who also played the wedding music. The toast to the bride was proposed by Rev. Dr. Burns and was responded to by the groom, and the usual toasts in addition, were duly honoured. Following the reception, the bride and groom left on their honeymoon, the bride’s going away costume being of air force blue, and she wore a corsage of gladioli."

October 16, 1941 IN MEMORIAM "THE LATE THOMAS J. MURPHY: “Farewell! A word that must be, and hath been — A sound which makes us linger: – yet, farewell.”

Just a week ago, under the tearful October skies, all that was mortal of the late Thomas J Murphy, of St. John’s East, was laid to rest in the valley of the Silent.

The news of his death came as quite a shock to his large circle of friends, for very few knew he had been ill. It was true that he was indisposed a short time ago, but his strong constitution helped him rally, and he was out and around on his favourite routine, meeting his acquaintances, conversing on topical questions, and displaying nothing that would excite anxiety. His passing came after barely two days confined to his home, and there was no sadness of farewell, for his wife was in constant attendance, and all the available members of the family were close at hand.

“Tom” Murphy was 61 years of age. He was the son of the late James Murphy, well known Wreck Commissioner at Trepassey, a section in which he took an active interest, and Minnie Murphy, granddaughter of Captain James Murphy, prominent Sealing skipper in the prosperous days of that Newfoundland Industry. He was educated at St. Bonaventure’s College, and eventually entered the Postal Telegraphs, being Operator at Come-by-Chance, Fortune Bay, and other Stations, and later appointed to the head office in the department. He spent 35 years in the Civil Service, before retiring on pension.

Deceased was a typical Newfoundlander; frank and open in his comment; proud of the Colony and its people; interested in politics, and fond of his home and family. He is survived by his wife, (formerly Miss Hilda Corcoran); five sons, Clement, who is Brother Aiden with the Christian Brothers in New York, James at the East End Stores; Hubert, Tonsorial Artist; Thomas with the Imperial Tobacco Co., Gordon; and two daughters, Loretta, at the Avalon Telephone Co., and Louise, in Boston — to all of whom sincere sympathy is extended.

The late Tom Murphy was one of many friends whose lives are undivided; so let his memory be. ”And they die, an equal death, — the dreamer and the man of Mighty deeds.” L.C.M."

October 16, 1941 BIRTHS CURTIS — To Rev. and Mrs. L.A.D. Curtis of Brigus, at Grace Hospital, a daughter.
October 16, 1941 MARRIAGES CRANE — ROBERTS: At Woodstock, Topsail, on Wednesday, Oct. 15th., by the Rev. Dr. Burns, Ruby May Cartwright, daughter of Mr. J.H. Roberts to William Heber Crane.
October 16, 1941 DEATHS "TUCK — Passed away suddenly at Winnipeg, October 15th, Harry L. Tuck.

KING — Passed away Wednesday morning, Violet King, daughter of Mrs. B. King, funeral Friday at 2.30 p.m., from her late residence 54 Bond Street.(New Glagow papers please copy)

THOMSON — Died suddenly, Arthur Roland Thomson, aged 63 years. Leaving to mourn one son, two daughters, one sister. Funeral today at 2.30, by motor hearse, from Carnell’s Funeral Hall.

ELLARD — Passed peacefully away, October 15th, Mary Ellard, daughter of the late Nicholas and Bridget Ellard; leaving to mourn two sisters and a large circle of friends. Funeral on Friday at 2.30 p.m., from her late residence, 75 King’s Road. May the Sacred Heart of Jesus have mercy on her soul.

WINSOR — Died suddenly at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Capt. Henry W. Winsor, son of the late Peter and Catherine Winsor of this city, leaving to mourn wife, two daughters, Mary and Patricia, also one son, Harry, now overseas in the Royal Artillery; one brother, Peter, at home, and three sisters in America. Funeral today Thursday, at 2.30 p.m., from his late residence, 26 Water Street W. May the Sacred Heart of Jesus have mercy on his soul.

MURPHY — Suddenly at 7 a.m. Tuesday, October 14th, Michael Murphy (Mason) eldest son of William and the late Elizabeth Murphy; leaving to mourn their sad loss, a wife, three sons, one now serving with His Majesty Forces, and one adopted son, father, stepmother, four brothers and one sister. Funeral at 2.30 today, Thursday, from his late residence Quidi Vidi Road. May his soul rest in peace."

October 16, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "The express leaving this evening, will make connection at Humbermouth for the St. John’s-Humbermouth service.

Mr. Wallace Dawe has arrived at Botwood to take up duties at the Custom House. His home town is St. John’s. — Grand Falls Advertiser.

An extraordinary general meeting of the Civil Service Association will be held in Victoria Hall on Wednesday next, the 22nd October at 8 p.m.

The weekly meeting of the City Council will be held this afternoon at three o’clock."

October 16, 1941 PROMOTIONS AND APPOINTMENTS "970384 A/L/Bdr. Vivian, A. Promoted Acting Bombardier with effect from 13/8/41

The undermentioned personnel are appointed Acting Lance Bombardiers with effect from 12/8/41

970718 Gunner Kane, A

970313 Gunner Dailey, J.

970297 Gunner Moores, W.

970510 Gunner Osmond, E.

970264 Gunner Oakley, C.

970494 Gunner Janes, W.

970088 Gunner Martin, J.

970599 Gunner Candow, C.

970363 Gunner Lush, E.

970049 Gunner Simms, F.

970056 Gunner Lake, H.

970551 Gunner Bowers, W.

970512 Gunner Guppy, J.

970219 Gunner Steele, D.

970021 Gunner Dawe, C.

970084 Gunner Maher, L.

970388 Gunner Kearsey, E.

970684 Gunner Gill, H.

970298 Gunner Gardiner, P.

970163 Gunner Symonds, A.

59th Nfld Heavy Regt., R. A. Appointed Acting Lance Bombardier with effect from 6/8/41, 970939 Gunner Gould, T. R. 970844 Gunner Mills, J.S.

Appointed Acting Lance Bombardier with effect from 6/7/41, 970108 Humber, A.H.

Appointed Acting Lance bombardier with effect from 9/8/41, 971408. Gunner Godfrey, C.E. 971491 Gunner Woodford, H."


October 17, 1941 SEAMEN GRATEFUL FOR KINDNESS Mr. David Murray of Glasgow, one of the 34 survivors who arrived at this port within the past weeks, leaves with the other members of the crew for Canada shortly. Of the survivors, two were at the General Hospital and one at the Grace Hospital, and they are now convalescent. Mr. Murray called at the Daily News office last night, to express his own thanks and those of his shipmates, for the kindness shown them during their stay here, and particularly Mr. and Mrs. O’Donnell, Mrs. Mac Baird, and Mrs. Conrad for the entertainment and motor drives. They also express thanks to the Doctors and Nurses at the General and Grace Hospitals.
October 17, 1941 HIS EXCELLENCY AND LADY WALWYN RETURN "Pay Visit to Gander, Botwood and Bishop Falls.

His excellency and Lady Walwyn returned to St. John’s in the “Terra Nova” attached to the Express, on Tuesday, October 16th., from a visit to Gander and Botwood.

The night of Monday, October 13th., was spent at Gander, and on the following morning, His Excellency inspected Canadian Troops on parade. After the march past, His Excellency addressed the men in the canteen, when he commented on the smart turnout. Lady Walwyn also made a short address to the men.

The Officers entertained His Excellency and Lady Walwyn to lunch in the Officers Mess, after which His Excellency made a tour of the Airport, and at 3 p.m. Lady Walwyn attended a meeting of the W.P.A. At tea, the party was entertained by the Officers of the R.C.A.F. The onward journey to Bishop’s Falls was made that night.

The next morning, Wednesday October 15th, a visit was paid to Botwood, where His excellency inspected Canadian Troops stationed there, and after the parade, both he and Lady Walwyn addressed the men, commenting on their extremely smart appearance. Lunch was taken in the Officers Mess, after which, His Excellency and Lady Walwyn inspected the Hospital and the new Seamen’s Institute recently opened. On the return to Bishop’s Falls, Lady Walwyn attended a meeting of the W.P.A. "

October 17, 1941 WEDDING BELLS "TEMPLETON — WINTER: On the afternoon of Thursday October 16th., at St. Thomas’s Church, the marriage took place of Mr. Robert Ledingham Templeton, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. R.A. Templeton, Bonaventure Avenue, to Kate Duglas, eldest daughter of Hon. H.A. and Mrs. Winter, of Winter Place. The Reverend J.T. Rhodes, B.A., officiated.

The bride, who was given in marriage by her father, wore a long-sleeved gown of white slipper satin, cut on tailored lines with diagonal seaming, the back panels flowing into a long train, to the edge of which her veil of tulle fell softly from a tiny cap of gardenias. She carried a bouquet of flame and white gladioli, lemon and peach carnations, with trailers of asparagus fern.

She was attended by her sister, Miss Gwyneth Winter as Maid-of-Honour, two bridesmaids, Miss Agnes Templeton, sister of the groom, and Miss Judith Carnell, and two pages, Masters Ted and Norman Goodridge. The maid of honour and the bridesmaids were dressed alike, in gowns of cascade green with bouffant taffeta skirts and low waisted fitted green velvet bodice, with sweetheart necks, their headdress being bows of green velvet, caught in the front and back with tiny yellow and peach velvet flowers. They carried bouquets of peach gladioli, yellow white and peach carnations, and asparagus fern. Master Ted and Norman Goodridge wore short trousers of black velvet, with long-sleeved white satin blouses.

Mr. Wilfred E. Peters was best man, and the ushers were Mr. David Templeton, brother of the groom . Lieutenant Norman Winter, the bride’s cousin, and Mr. Bertram Carnell. Mrs. Winters, the mother of the bride wore a gown of Grape lace and crepe, a black hat and accessories and a silver fox fur. She carried a bouquet of Rubrum lilies, pink pompoms and asparagus fern. Mrs. Templeton, the groom’s mother wore a pale blue moire taffeta gown with a black hat , and silver fox fur, and carried a bouquet of pink carnations, gladioli and asparagus fern.

During the signing of the register, Mr. T.W. Stirling, organist and choirmaster of St. Thomas’s Church, played, “Because” by O’Hardlot and Shubert’s “Serenade.”

On leaving the Church, the wedding party passed through staves held by the Boys of St. Andrew’s troop of Boy Scouts, of which the groom had been the Scoutmaster for nine years.

After the reception, which was held at Northbank, Circular Road, Mr. and Mrs. Templeton left on the afternoon express for Spruce Brook, where the honeymoon will be spent. The bride travelled in a bottle green wool crepe dress, over which she wore a fitted coat of beige polocloth, trimmed with a collar of dark brown beaver, her accessories being bottle-green and dark brown.

MILLER — SEYMOUR: A very pretty wedding was solemnized at St. John’s Cathedral at 7.30 p.m. on the evening of October 14th., by Rev. J. Brinton, when Miss Elsie Seymour of Spaniard’s Bay was united in marriage to Mr. Oswald Miller of St. John’s.

The bride entered the Church leaning on the arm of her brother-in-law, Mr. Malcolm Squires. The bride looked charming in rose petal ensemble with wine accessories, and carried a bouquet of white carnations with maidenhair fern. She was attended by Miss Marguerite Renouf, who looked very charming in navy and white ensemble. The duties of the best man was performed by Laughton Hutchings.

After the ceremony, a reception was held at Woodstock, where many friends and relatives of the happy couple gathered, and joined in wishing them every future happiness."

October 17, 1941 AIRMAN MISSING The Secretary for Defence, Lieut.-Colonel Rendell, has received the following information from the R.C.A.F. Officer in Gloucester, England: TAYLOR – Cyril Garfield, Sergeant, R. Can. 69562, missing as the result of air operations on the 12th October, 1941. Next of kin, Mother, Mrs. Gilbert Taylor, 20 First Avenue, Grand Falls, Newfoundland.
October 17, 1941 BIRTHS HOPKINS — At St. Clare’s Hospital Thursday, Oct. 16th., to Mary Cameron, wife of Lloyd Hopkins, a son.
October 17, 1941 MARRIAGE TEMPLETON – WINTER: On Oct. 16th., at St. Thomas’s Church, by Rev. J.T. Rhodes, Kate Douglas, daughter of the Hon. H.A. and Mrs. Winter, to Robert Ledingham, son of Mr. and Mrs. R.A. Templeton.
October 17, 1941 DEATH BISHOP — Passed away on Thursday at 12.15 p.m., at her residence, 48 Pennywell Road, Sarah G., widow of the late Joseph Bishop; leaving one son, John, and two daughters, Mrs. Minnie G. Tucker, City, and Mrs. Major A Brewer, London, Ont. Funeral on Saturday at 2.30 p.m. by motor hearse.
October 17, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "On the South Side of Harvey Road, Council employees have laid approximately 900 lineal feet of concrete sidewalk.

Tomorrow will be Apple Day with the Boy Scouts, and it is hoped it will be as generously supported as in past years.

The monthly meeting of the Newfoundland Protective Association of Shop and Office Employees, will be held on Monday night at Victoria Hall.

Three motorist were before Court yesterday, charged with breaches of the parking regulations. One was fined $3.00 and the others $1.00 each.

A meeting of the general executive of the Newfoundland Patriotic Association will be held at the Board of Trade rooms tonight at eight o’clock. Business of importance is to be transacted.

A special train with some five hundred men, who were recently laid off at Gander, arrived here at points on the Carbonear branch last Thursday night. — Bay Roberts Guardian.

Sunday last was observed as Harvest Festival Sunday in the United Church at Corner Brook. The Church was appropriately decorated with autumn leaves, flowers, vegetables and fruit.

The Codroy Valley Correspondent of the Western Star, states that farmers are having quite a task digging potatoes in the rainy weather. Crops are estimated to be less than half that of former years.

In preparation for the herring fishery, some three cargoes of salt arrived at Curling lately.

A farmer from Mount Pearl was summoned yesterday, for using threatening language. He was put under bonds in the sum of $100.00.

Rabbits were for sale in the city stores yesterday for the first time. The price was high but ready purchasers were found.

A motorist was before Court yesterday, charged with exceeding the speed limited on Quidi Vidi North Boulevard. The prosecution was taken by and in the name of Perley Morse, Chief of Police at Fort Pepperrell. The charge was dismissed as there was no evidence to prove who was driving the car.

Three girls ages 17 years, were before the Magistrate Court today, charged with stealing the property of Dick Harris Jewellery Store. They failed to appear, and bench warrants were issued for their arrest. In the afternoon, they appeared and pleaded guilty to stealing one ring. One was fined $4.00 or 7 days and the others $10.00 or thirty days. The fines were not paid.

The following are the collections of the Red Cross Flag Day, held on October 4th. There are still about twenty Bowaters logging camps to be heard from, and when these come in, the completed collection of the camps will be published. Townside $996.47, West Side $232.23, Curling $131.07, Deer Lake $84.13, Humbermouth $34.46, Howley $13.20. — Western Star."


October 21, 1941 OBITUARY "WILLIAM BARRY LEAVENS: Whilst sitting at his table at home in Summit, New Jersey, on October 12th., Mr. William Barry Leavens was touched by the Angel of Death, and passed on to join his kith and kin in eternity.

He was married to the former Miss Annie MacDonald of St. John’s, a sister of R.G. MacDonald, Esq., and well known Druggist, and of Mrs. Bessie MacGreggor, of St. John’s. He was a Director of the Simmons Bed Co. of New Jersey, but a few years ago retired from business, and spent his last few years in travel and leisure. The late Mr. Leavens is survived by his wife, one daughter, Mrs. Helen Winters, two sons, William and John. The funeral took place in Passaic, N.J., on Oct. 14th., where he was laid to rest in the family plot. The late Mr. Leavens was married at St. Thomas’s Church, and visited Nfld. on two or three occasions.

MRS JESSIE A AMBROSE: The death occurred recently at Brandon, Manitoba, of Mrs. Jessie A. Ambrose, widow of the late Rev. W.B. Ambrose, who passed away in 1934. Mrs. Ambrose, who was 74 years of age, was born in Bonavista, Newfoundland, and for the past six years she had made her home in Brandon.

Surviving are one son and a daughter; George Ambrose, in Whitemouth, Manitoba; Miss Nellie Ambrose of Brandon, and one brother, Mr. Heber Mifflin, at Bonavista. Rev. Eric D. Errey, officiated at the funeral."

October 21, 1941 WEDDING BELLS "HUNTER — HUMBER: The marriage took place at George Street United Church Manse, on October 17th, at 8 p.m., of Bertha May, daughter of Head Constable Andrew and Mrs. Humber of Grand Falls, and John Macintosh, youngest son of Mrs. Hunter and the late Edward G Hunter of this city. Rev. A.F. Binning, M. A., B.D., S.T.M., officiated at the ceremony.

The bride looked charming in a very becoming frock of ruby chiffon velvet, with matching hat and veil. She wore a corsage of palest pink carnations and maidenhair fern. Her attendants were her sister, Mrs. F.D. Snow, as matron of honour, and Miss Annie Hunter, sister of the bridegroom, as bridesmaid. Mr. Gerald W. Wigner of the Newfoundland Base Command, acted as best man. As the bride entered the drawing room, accompanied by her father who gave her in marriage, the Wedding March was played by Miss Helen Oates, A.T.C.L.

After the ceremony, an informal reception was held at the home of the bridegroom’s mother, City Terrace, where the usual toasts were honoured, at the conclusion of which, Miss Margaret Pelley rendered very beautifully two appropriate songs, “I’ll Walk Beside Thee”, and, “Because”.

After a dainty supper had been served, the happy couple left, amidst a shower of confetti and the good wishes of the guests, for a short honeymoon at a point in Conception Bay."

October 21, 1941 DEATHS WINTER — Suddenly on Sunday October 19th., Marmaduke George, youngest son of the late Thomas and Florence Winter. Funeral tomorrow, Wednesday, at 2.30 p.m., from his late residence, 8 Prince of Wales Street.
October 21, 1941 MARRIAGES HUNTER – HUMBER: At George Street United Church Manse on Friday, October 17th., by Rev. A.F. Bennington, M.A., B.D., S.T.M., Bertha May, daughter of Head Constable Andrew and Mrs. Humber of Grand Falls, to John Macintosh, son of Mrs. Hunter and the late Edward G. Hunter of this city.

October 22, 1941 CASUALTY REPORT "THOMAS – Peter Walter, Able Seaman No. P/JX194581, missing, presumed killed on war service. Next of kin, Father, Mr. George Thomas, Portugal Cove, St. John’s, East, Newfoundland.

WALSH — Patrick Joseph, Able Seaman P/JX174351, missing, presumed killed on war service. Next of kin, Adopted Father, Mr. William Howlett, Petty Harbor, St. John’s West, Newfoundland.

TRASK — Joseph Louis, Sergeant, Observer, No. 798549, R.A.F., previously reported missing, now a prisoner of war in Germany. Next of kin, Father, Mr. Chas. Trask, Elliston, Trinity Bay, Newfoundland."

October 22, 1941 HONOURED ON EVE OF HIS WEDDING "On the eve of his approaching marriage on Wednesday, Oct. 22nd, Mr. G.B. Hefferton, Proprietor of the Grocery Store on St. Clare and Golf Avenue, was entertained by a gathering of his friends, at the well known Hostelry of Mrs. Liddy at Torbay, on Monday night, Oct. 20th. After the party had assembled, Mr. Reg Morgan was installed as master of ceremonies, and under his genial lead, assisted by Messrs, G. LeShano and H. Quinton, the party was gay and happy. The crowd was especially pleased to have with them, Mr. McCaulay of Borden’s Milk Canada, a regular visitor to this Country for more than 30 years.

Mr. Reg. Morgan, in very happily phrased language, spoke and expressed the good wishes of the gathering to “Bernie”, and on their behalf, asked Mr. LeShano to present the guest of the evening with a tangible token of their esteem. So George, in a few but graceful words, handed to Bernie a smoker’s stand.

The guest responded, and expressed his deep appreciation of the unexpected token of good fellowship, and amid the continued good wishes for future happiness from the crowd, acknowledged same in customary manner.

Other speakers followed, with an occasional burst of community singing, so that time passed all too quickly, the party dispersing, radiating good wishes to the future groom."

October 22, 1941 DINNER IN HONOUR OF NAVAL MAN "On Monday night, Oct 20th., a number of friends gathered at the home of Messrs, William and Lester Peckford, 6 Kimberly Row, and gave Able Seaman, Reg. LeGrow a turkey dinner. The home of Messrs Peckford was very tastefully decorated for the event, the brothers having gone to much trouble to make their honoured guest and friends feel at home.

Among the guests present, were Capt. Herbert Gosse and Capt. John Dominey, together with Matthew LeGrow, a brother of the Naval lad who is serving with the Newfoundland Militia, and a number of Reg’s closest friends and friends from Bauline.

The guests sat down to a splendid dinner, tastefully prepared by the Misses Peckford. After some twenty five friends had partaken of the dinner, an impromptu toast list was taken up and duly honoured, Mr. Leonard Knight presiding.

Congratulations and good wishes were extended by many present, after which cards, songs and dancing were indulged in until early morning, when with the singing of Auld Lang Syne, For He’s a Jolly Good Fellow, and God Save the King, the party dispersed."

October 22, 1941 WEDDING BELLS "HOLMES — ADAMS: A quiet but most attractive military wedding was solemnized in Norte Dame Church, Grand Falls, on Thursday morning, October 9th, when Miss Marjorie Adams, daughter of Mrs. and the late Alonzo Adams of Milton, was united in marriage to Sgnm. Robert Edward Holmes of Blissfield, New Brunswick, the officiating Clergyman being Captain the Rev. W.J. Enright, Military Chaplin at Botwood.

The bride was beautifully gowned in white satin with tulle veil, and carried a bouquet of sweet peas and maiden hair fern. Her bridesmaid, Miss Kathryn Ethridge, looked charming in an Alice blue gown, with a bouquet. of sweet peas and roses. The groom, who was in military uniform, was supported by Sgnm. Alex Beauchamp, of Douglas, Ont. who was in military uniform also. The bride’s mother, Mrs. E. Adams, who had come from Milton for the happy occasion, was beautifully dressed in Air Force blue.

After the ceremony, a delicious wedding breakfast was served at Baird’s Hotel, where the customary toasts were honoured. The happy couple left by Saturday’s express for Milton, where a reception was held at the home of the bride, and the beautiful gifts which were received, testified to the esteem in which the couple was held."

October 22, 1941 DEATHS DROVER — Suddenly at the General Hospital, last evening, T.L Drover, aged 66 years. Funeral by motor hearse Thursday at 3 p.m., from his brother’s residence, Forest Road.
October 22, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "The Shop and Office Employees Protective Association are holding a card party on Friday night in the T.A. Armoury. The proceeds will be devoted to providing Christmas comforts for members of the Association who are serving overseas.

The Trade Review states that California dried fruits are all very firm, and they have to cross US by rail now, which adds slightly to the cost. United States Government has made some large purchases, and the market thoroughly is described as “very strong.”

The second annual meeting of the Badger Branch of the W.P.A. was held on Wednesday, October 8th. Reports were submitted which showed an improvement over last year’s work. The sum of $300 was raised during the year. It was an increase of $46.10 over of the previous year. The members knitted a total of 425 an improvement, this being 186 more than that of last year. — Grand Falls Advertiser.

A most enjoyable dance was held at Gander, last Wednesday night, when the Belmont Construction Co. acted as host for the occasion of the opening the new Belmont Club at Gander. About sixty young ladies from Grand Falls left by special train at 5 p.m. A turkey dinner was served in Gander and the dance was held in the new club, where an excellent buffet supper was served. The train returned to Grand Falls Thursday morning, and its guests speak highly of the hospitality shown by the Belmont Co. — Grand Falls Advertiser. "


October 23, 1941 WEDDING BELLS "HEFFERTON — BUTLER: The wedding took place yesterday afternoon at 3.30, at the Anglican Church, Topsail, of Rita M., daughter of Rev. W.A. and Mrs. Butler of Topsail, to G.B. Hefferton, St. Clare’s Avenue, St. John’s, the ceremony being performed by Rev. W.A. Butler, father of the bride, assisted by Rev. Heber Gosse, Rector of Kelligrews.

The bride, who was given in marriage by Rev. Canon Bolt, was gowned in white satin, cut on princess lines, with bridal veil, caught with orange blossoms, and carried a bouquet of pink and white carnations. The bridesmaids were Misses Marian Butler and Irene Butler, sisters of the bride, who wore flocks of blue taffeta and rose taffeta respectively, and hats and accessories to match, and carried bouquet of sweet peas and carnations. Mr. S.J. Hefferton, brother of the groom was best man.

The bride’s mother wore a dress of wine chiffon velvet, and a corsage of carnations and fern.

The Church, which was beautifully decorated, was filled to capacity for the wedding, with friends from Topsail and St. John’s, and during the signing of the register, a vocal solo, “O Perfect Love” was given by Mrs. H. Gosse.

A reception was held at the Rectory when the toast to the bride was proposed by Rev. Canon Bolt and responded by the groom, who proposed the toast to the bridesmaids, and this toast was responded by the best man. The toast to the bride’s parents was proposed by Mr. S.J. Hefferton and responded to by Rev. W.A. Butler, the bride’s father.

The bride’s going away dress was a suit of wine chiffon velveteen with fur coat and matching accessories. The bride and groom are spending their honeymoon on the Peninsula of Avalon and will take up residence at St. Clare’s Avenue."

October 23, 1941 SECURED GOOD VOYAGE AT OFFER WADHAMS "Over 300 Quintals Landed By One Crew. Two Elder fishermen Land 30 Qtls.

Mr. Frank Hicks of Doting Cove, N.D.B., and his two sons, one about twelve years old, and the other not quite twenty, with one Shareman not belonging to the family, made something of a record catch this summer. Fishing from the Offer Wadham’s Islands, this crew, three of whom belonged to the same family, landed over 200 quintals using only hook and line. At prevailing prices, the financial returns from the sale of this fine voyage of fish will reach a fine figure. Mr. Hicks could not manage to make all of the fish this fall, and is holding over the remainder in salt bulk till next spring.

Mr. Simeon Guy and Mr. Moses Guy, aged seventy years, and sixty-six years respectively, decided to have another “go’ at the fishery this summer. Leaving their homes at Musgrave Harbor on July 1st., they proceeded to the Wadham’s Island in a small row-boat, only large enough to hold about four quintals of fish. Before the end of the month they had landed over thirty quintals of cod, using hook and line. Satisfied that they could still do their share on the sea, these two hardy fishermen left for the mainland to attend to harvesting of hay and vegetables."

October 23, 1941 VETERANS HONOUR FORMER COMRADE "Last Obsequies of the Late Sergt M.G. Winter, M.M., of “Ours”

“And so we wear the poppy we, In memory of our gallant dead.”

The war of 1914-18 seems like a dream. Only the trailing clouds of memory remain, and those who were prominent in that crusade should not be forgotten.

The funeral of the late “Duke” Winter yesterday afternoon, largely attended by representative citizens, was also a symbol of the everlasting remembrance of the G.W.V.A. A guard of honour from the Sergeant's Mess acted as pallbearers. The casket was draped with the Union Jack, and the Executive of the War Veterans, wearing poppies, were present in the large cortege of mourners.

Interment was in the C of E Cemetery, where the service was taken by Rev. J.T. Rhodes, B.A. The ritual of the C.W.V.A. was read at the grave side by President S. Dewling, M.M., of the Sergeant's Mess, followed by a brief silence and the impressive falling of the flowers of rememberance.

Thus was laid to rest another Soldier who lived to the brightest tradition of the Claret and White on the Field of Flanders, and whos tragic passing is a matter of sympathetic record.

Tomorrow is a hope! Yesterday is a dream! Only the travelling clouds of memory remain!"

October 23, 1941 LIVE RABBIT AWAITS OWNER Yesterday morning, the wife of Constable Reynolds, who lives at Howe Place, saw a live rabbit in their backyard. During the day, some boys tried to catch the animal but without success. But in the afternoon, Constable Reynolds succeeded in doing so. He now has the rabbit waiting for its owner. It is apparently a tame rabbit, being black in colour with a white spot.

October 24, 1941 SIR JOHN R. BENNETT DIED YESTERDAY "Had Notable Career In Political, Business, and Social Life of Country — Was District Grand Master Masonic Fraternity.

The passing of Sir John R. Bennett, K.B.E., which occurred at 10 o’clock yesterday morning, removes one of the city’s foremost citizens, and a well known and highly-regarded son of Newfoundland. In public, business, and social life, he loomed largely in the public eye. Native born, he was proud of his citizenship and not only possessed a staunch faith in his country, but gave freely of his time and talents in the promotion of its welfare. Every public movement found in him an active and enthusiastic supporter, and many organizations will be the poorer because of his removal.

Born in St. John’s on August 8th, 1866, the son of the late Edward and Amelia Goff Bennett, he obtained his education at Bishop Feild College. At the age of 15 he began his business career, becoming a Clerk in the firm of C.F. Bennett& Co. In 1893 he took over and reorganized the business of G.H. Gaden under the name of Gaden Aerated Water Co. Ltd., and later organized a company, of which he became the largest shareholder and President, which purchased the brewing business of E.W. Bennett & Co., a connection which he maintained until his death.

Sir John's public career may be said to have begun in 1902 with his election to the City Council at the head of the poll. Two years later, he entered the larger sphere of National politics, when he was elected to represent St. John’s West in the House of Assembly, as a colleague of the late Sir Edward (afterwards Lord) Morris, a district he continued to represent until 1923, when as the leader of the newly organized Liberal-Progressive Party, he unsuccessfully contested the Dirtrict of Harbor Grace. An election being precipitated the following year, he again contested Harbor Grace, this time under the leadership of Hon. W. S. Monroe, and was successful. In 1932 he was appointed a member of the Legislative Council. He attained Cabinet rank in 1913, When he became Colonial Secretary, a post which he held until 1917, when the Militia Department being created, he became its first Minister. On the conclusion of the war, he resumed the portfolio of Colonial Secretary, and continued in office until the defeat of Sir Michael Cashin’s administration, which succeeded the National Government in the Fall of 1919. With the return of the Monroe Government in 1924, he again became Colonial Secretary. In 1926, in recognition of his public servic, the Order of Knighthood of the British Empire was conferred upon him.

In Masonic circles, the passing of Sir John Bennett will be keenly felt. Fifty-three years ago he was initiated in St. John’s Lodge, No. 579, and after passing through the various offices, became Worshipful Master in 1898. He was the oldest living Past Master of his lodge at his death. In 1923 he succeeded the late Hon. J.A. Cliff as District Grand Master, under the English Constitution, and was installed by Lord Amphill, Pro Grand Knight, who with other officers of the Grand Lodge, came here especially to perform the ceremony. During his term as District Grand Master, he attended important functions at London, and had the privilege of seeing the number of lodges in his district increased.

A life-long member of the Anglican Cathedral, he was prominent in the official life of his Church, and his activities in educational and philanthropic matters will be long remembered. He was a keen sportsman, and for many years was an active member of the Regatta committee, and an ardent curler. He was also a member of the Golf Club.

In 1891, he was married to Miss Laura Taylor, by whom he had three sons, Frank, Manager, Gaden’s Aerated Water Works, Sidney, Director of Reid Newfoundland Co., Ltd., and Raymond, Medical Superintendent of the Sanatorium, and one daughter, Marguerite, (Mrs. John Keddie) residing in Montreal, all of whom survive their father. He is also survived by the widow of his second marriage, formerly Mrs. R. Grieve, daughter of the late George and Mrs. Hutchings. Sir John Bennett will be mourned also by a large circle of friends. For his widow there will be sorrow and sympathy. For him there is peace.

The funeral will take place tomorrow, Saturday afternoon, at 3 o’clock, from the Masonic Temple."

October 24, 1941 OBITUARY "GEORGE BUTLER: A telegram from Corner Brook yesterday morning, announced the death at that town, of George Butler, President of the Corner Brook Branch G.W.V.A.

The deceased, who was in his 49th. year, was born at Greenspond, son of Walter and the late Alfreda Butler. Coming to St. John’s, he was with the Tailoring Department of the Royal Stores Ltd., and in 1914, enlisted in the Royal Newfoundland Regiment, being one of the First Five Hundred, his regimental number being 452. In 1917, he was wounded through the liver, and for two years was an inmate of Wandsworth Hospital, having 17 operations since then. He was one of the Coronation Contingent.

He was Chairman of the West Coast Clinic, Corner Brook. This year, he was elected Grand Master of the Royal Black Preceptory, and was a Past Noble Grand of the I.O.O.F. He was Sergeant-Major of the Salvation Army Corps at Corner Brook.

He leaves to mourn, his wife, the former Lana Downton of Grand Falls, one son George, Pilot with the R.C.A.F., two daughters, Gladys, with Goodyear and House at Corner Brook, and Mildred at home, and six brothers, Charles O., with Confederation Life, James with the Toronto Mail and Globe, Anthony, Mechanical Superintendent with Greyhound Bus Service, Toronto, Walter of the Newfoundland Constabulary, Alexander with the Royal Air Force, Alfred with the Avalon Telephone Company, and one sister, Mrs John Churchill, Corner Brook.

The funeral takes place tomorrow, Saturday, at Corner Brook."

October 24, 1941 BOY HIT ON HEAD WITH A BOARD At 7.30 p.m. yesterday, Mrs. Gallagher, of Burke’s Square, reported to the Police that her son Douglas was hit on the head with a board, by a truck helper, whilst walking on New Gower Street. The boy was conveyed to the General Hospital where he was attended by Dr. H.B. Murphy, and later was taken home.
October 24, 1941 TRIAL BEGINS BUT ADJOURNED TILL TUESDAY "Witnesses On Way From Canada — Held Up for Hour Waiting for Accused.

The trial of Delbert Mills, a Private in the Canadian Army, began yesterday at the Supreme Court, before Hon. Mr. Justice Dunfield and the following special jury: Thomas Clare, Carmen Mews, Maxwell Dawe, Ernest Richards, Wallace Moores, John Snow, James Ash, John J. Kielly, Patrick Caul, John J. Osmond, Frederick Murphy, Joseph McKinlay. He is charged with attempted rape.

Mr. Carter, K.C., appeared for the Crown and Mr. Gordon Higgins for the accused. Only one witness was examined yesterday, Dr. Moores, who was to proceed to Canada, and after his evidence was taken, adjournment was taken until Tuesday next. This was due because of the non-arrival of three witnesses who are on the way here from Canada.

When the trial was called yesterday morning, the accused failed to put in an appearance. After he was arrested in August last, he was remanded in care of the Military Authorities, who undertook to produce him when the trial was set. Sergeant Rocke was sent from the Court to find the prisoner, and located him in the detention camp at the barracks. Hon. Mr. Justice Dunfield instructed the Registrar to get in touch with the Commanding Officer and have the Officer responsible for the delay in having the prisoner produced, come before Court and give an explanation as to the delay."

October 24, 1941 DEATHS "BENNETT — Entered into rest at his residence, Monkstown Road, yesterday morning, Sir John R. Bennett, K.B.E. Funeral on Saturday afternoon from the Masonic Temple at 3 o’clock, to the Church of England Cathedral.

BERRIGAN — Suddenly October 23rd, Elizabeth (Bessie) M. Berrigan, leaving to mourn two nephews, two nieces, and a large circle of friends. Funeral on Saturday at 2.30 p.m., from her late residence, 109 Theatre Hill. R.I.P.

BUTLER — Passed away suddenly at Corner Brook on October 23rd., George Butler, aged 48 years, leaving to mourn wife, two daughters, one son (George with the R.C.A.F.), Father and 6 brothers and one sister.

CLARKE — Passed peacefully away at the Sanatorium 11 p.m. October 23rd, Bertha, aged 28 years, beloved daughter of Ann and the late Samuel Clarke of Victoria. Leaving to mourn their sad loss, a loving mother, four brothers and two sisters.

WILLIAMS — entered into rest suddenly, at an early hour yesterday morning, Mary H. Payne, beloved wife of Walter B. Williams. Funeral from her late residence, 80 Circular Road, today at 2.30 p.m."

October 24, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "The Woods Department management has decided to increase the pulpwood cut this Fall and Winter by several thousand cords, and could now find employment for several hundred men to begin work at once and continue throughout the winter — Western Star.

A Taximan was before Court yesterday, charged with speeding on Le Marchant Road. He was fined $10.00. A Traffic Officer tailed him, and found he was doing 40 m.p.h.

A report from Belloram states that there is a sign of fish but bait unobtainable.

The Bay Roberts Guardian states, “A coal shortage, the second for this year, at present exists here. Many Householders have a twelve month supply in, while there are others with absolutely no firing at all. The prospects for a further shipment of coal in the near future are not so good.”

Maxwell Sharpe and William Young who were arrested early yesterday morning, on the roofs of buildings on Water Street, appeared before Court and were charged with loitering with intent to commit a felony, and having in their possession instruments for the purpose of housebreaking. They were remanded for eiight days. They asked for bail but it was refused.

A surface of pit sand is now being applied to the local road in Bay Roberts, and the work has progressed as far as the S.A. Citadel. Dump trucks were employed at this work, and a surface about one foot deep in the centre, and tapering away at the side of the road, is being put on. Residents of the West end found it very uncomfortable during the past few days of wet weather, as the rain made the new surface very sloppy. — Bay Roberts Guardian.

William Buddie, a Canadian Soldier, was before the Magistrate’s Court yesterday charged with stealing the sum of $120.00 from men in the barracks at Lester’s Field. He was sentenced to twelve months imprisonment. Seargent Goodhue giving evidence, stated that in the early morning of October 8th., he found the accused at the foot of the Sergeant Major’s bed, and later in the day, there were complaints of pockets having been rifled. Lieut. Greaves who gave evidence, stated that the accused did not belong to their Regiment, and he did not know how he got into camp. It was the lowest form of theft that a Soldier could be guilty of, and he asked that the maximum penalty be imposed. The accused in a statement made after his arrest, stated he had spent $65 on taxi driving and on his girl friend. The sum of $55 was recovered."


October 25, 1941 MERCHANT MARINE MEN MISSING Information has been received by the Department of Public Health and Welfare, from the Registrar of Seamen, Cardiff, to the effect that the following men of the Mercantile Marine are missing at sea, their ship being torpedoed on the 19th September, namely: A. THORNHILL, 66 Cabot Street, EDWARD LEE, Grand Bank, and JAMES MONSTER, Fortune, F.B. Steps were at once taken to have the next of kin notified accordingly.
October 25, 1941 CASUALTY REPORT "KEEPING, Chesley, Able Seaman, JX245594, missing on war service. Next of kin, mother, Mrs. John Keeping, Rencontre East, Newfoundland.

CANNING, Weston Knee, Seaman, JX188878, missing on war service. Next of kin, father, Mr. Wilfred Canning, 15 Mayor Avenue, St. John’s, Newfoundland"

October 25, 1941 VOLUNTEERS FOR ROYAL AIR FORCE "The following volunteers for Royal Air Force Air Craft Crews, are being sent to Canada for training:

21st DRAFT: 798736 Grant, Douglas Munroe. 798738 Murray, Allan David. 798738 Power, Jerome Francis."

October 25, 1941 SHIPMENTS ORE FROM INDIAN HEAD "Another Outcrop Staked At Gull Pond in Past Two Weeks.

The iron deposit at Indian Head between Stephenville Crossing and Stephenville, is still under development, with considerable quantities of the ore going to the nearest shipping point.

During the past two weeks, another outcrop of this ore at Gull Pond, about a mile and a half North of Indian Head, was staked off for development, and a motor truck road has been started for shipping purposes.

There is nothing new to report on the gypsum development at Coal Brook, three miles from St. George’s. Engineers representing the owners, have been on the ground for sometime. A road will have to be built, and St. George’s pier repaired, before shipping begins there. – Western Star."

October 25, 1941 ST. MARY’S CHURCH TROUPE AT BRIGUS BRIGUS, Oct. 23 – A delightful entertainment, under the auspices of the Brigus W.P.A., was given by a troupe from St . Mary’s Church, St. John’s, in the Academy Hall, Brigus on Wednesday, October 15th, with Mrs. Messacar, famous artiste of stage and radio, accompanied by Mr. Allan Pittman, as special guest. Also present as guests of the W.P.A. were Able Seamen Barrett and Dawe, who were presented with parcels of cigarettes on behalf of the W.P.A. A special welcome was extended to Canon and Mrs Sterling, who accompanied the troupe. The entertainment which was a great success, was thoroughly enjoyed by everybody, and the sum of $65.00 was realized. The W.P.A. wishes to express its thanks to the performers for the fine entertainment presented.

October 27, 1941 WEDDING BELLS "LeDREW — FOWLER: The marriage of Marion E., daughter of R.C. Fowler of Kelligrews, to Joseph B., son of Mr. and Mrs. Isaac LeDrew of the same place, was solemnized at 3.30 on Tuesday Oct. 14th, at Foxtrap All Saints’ Church, the Rev. Heber Gosse officiating.

The bride entered the Church on the arm of her father, looking very dainty in a gown of white chiffon with floor length veil fastened in tiara fashion, with wreath of orange blossoms, and carrying a bouquet of white carnations, chrysanthemums, pink gladiolus and maiden-hair fern. Her attendants were her sister, Mrs. R. Pennell, and the groom’s sister, Miss Dora LeDrew, tastefully gowned in rose and blue taffeta respectively, with matching halos, and carrying bouquets of white and deep rose chrysanthemums and maiden-hair fern. The groom was supported by his brother Mr. Ralph LeDrew.

After the ceremony, a very tasty supper was served at the home of the bride to some one hundred guests, after which, they all assembled in the C. of E. School, where dancing was enjoyed until midnight, when the bride and groom left on their honeymoon tour. They took with them the good wishes of their many friends and acquaintances. May they have many, many years of wedded bliss, is the sincere with of - A GUEST."

October 27, 1941 DIED AT PETTY HR. "Mrs. Gus Chafe : At 10 a.m. on Saturday morning, following Solemn Requiem Mass at the Church of St. Joseph, all that was mortal of the late Mrs. Mary J. (Baba) Chafe was laid to rest on the hillside cemetery near First Pond, at Petty Harbor.

Deceased was a well known resident of the section, and had many friends in the city and elsewhere. She was pre-deceased by her husband, Augustus Chafe, some years ago, and since then conducted a business in The Harbor with a large measure of success. She was over 70 years of age and is survived by several sons and a number of relatives.

Mrs. Chafe was only ill for a few days, being stricken on Sunday morning, when Dr. O’Regan was called from St. John’s. Later, the Sacrament of the Holy Church was administered, and at an early hour on Thursday morning, she breathed her last.

Mass was celebrated by Very Rev. E.J. Rawlins, P.P., and Undertaker Murphy looked after the final arrangements."

October 27, 1941 ONLY 410 BARRELS LOCAL POTATOES OFFERED. "Public Works Dept. Called Tenders For 1,000 Brls — Balance Will be Imported.

Supplies Division, Department Public Works, on the 14th October, asked for tenders for the supply of 1.000 barrels of graded potatoes, suitable for winter keeping, delivered at the Railway Station, St. John’s, or alternately at the Hospital for Mental and Nervous diseases. As a result of the request only 410 barrels of local potatoes were offered and these were accepted, the balance of 590 barrels were accepted for imported potatoes and one wholesale concern put in a tender.

Tenders were accepted from R.W. Clarke, Victoria; Thomas Terry, Chapel’s Cove; W.G. Parsons & Son, Ochre Pit Cove, and Mrs. Walter Smith, Manuels. The only tender received, that from F. McNamara Ltd. for imported potatoes, was accepted as to 590 barrels.

The price paid by the same Government Department for potatoes at this time last year, was $2.00 per barrel, and this October, the price approximates $4.70 per barrel, or an increased cost of $2.70 on item."

October 27, 1941 CASUALTY REPORT The Secretary for Defence has received the following information, from the Adjutant of the 51st Squadron, England: WHEELER, Clarence Edmund, Segt. R65205 R.C.A.F., is missing from an operational flight on the night of October 24th - 25th, 1941. Next of kin, father, Mr. Francis E Wheeler, 47 Prince of Wales Street, St. John’s, Newfoundland.
October 27, 1941 ODDITIES "West Point, N.Y. – Not in several years has an Army Squad been so alert and capable in the first game of the season, as were the Cadets in defeating the Citadel 19-6.

War is Expensive — Somebody has figured from war statistics, it is costing the warring Countries $50,000 to kill a man.

Engine of Parts — More than 8,000 separates pieces of metal go into a single large air plane engine."


October 28, 1941 WEDDING BELLS "FURLONG — WOOLSTON: The wedding of Gunner Peter Joseph, son of Mr. and Mrs. Peter J. Furlong, of 5 Bully Street, St. John’s, Newfoundland, and Miss Kathleen Ann Woolston, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Woolston of East House California, Great Ormsby, took place at St. Mary’s R.C. Church, Yarmouth, England, on Saturday, September 13th.

Given away by her brother, Mr. George Woolston, the bride wore a satin dress with shoes to match, and carried a bouquet of pink roses and carnations. The bridesmaids were the Misses G.H. and M. Woolston and Miss N. Qacey. The Misses H and M. Woolston wore green satin dresses with headdresses to match. They carried bouquets of Pink carnations, and their gifts from the bridegroom were gold crosses and chains. The Misses G. and J. Woolston, and Miss Wacey, wore blue satin dresses with silver headdress. Gunner G.J. Furlong, brother of the groom, was best man.

A reception was held at the California Tavern. Amongst the fifty presents received was a cheque from the bride’s employer, Mr. R. Wating, and from Capt. Louis Brookes, Liason Officer, and Lieut. Gordon Warrwen of the Newfoundland Regiment, Heavy Artillery.

Gunner Furlong and his brother, are serving with the Newfoundland Regiment Heavy Artillery, somewhere in England. The many friends of the groom here, will extend to him best wishes for a long and happy married life, and will be glad to welcome to Newfoundland, his young bride."

October 28, 1941 MOVING THE CONGESTION AT NORTH SYDNEY On Saturday night last, there were 190 cars of freight at North Sydney for Newfoundland points, and during last week, there were 85 cars moved from North Sydney by regular steamer and a special steamer. The Railway has chartered a steamer with a capacity of 80 cars, which will be loaded in the early days of this week. A steamer with a capacity of 35 carloads (C.N.R. ) will probably make direct connections with St. John’s, and another vessel will be chartered by the Railway, so as to relieve the congestion at North Sydney.
October 28, 1941 CASUALTY REPORT "SYMMONDS, Garfield Cyril, Seaman, JX211516, missing on war service. Next of kin, father, Mr. Cyril Smmonds, Bonne Bay, Newfoundland.

DECKER, Chesley, Seaman, previously reported dangerously ill with meningitis, now reported died at Sydney Military Hospital, Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada, on Saturday, October 25, 1941. Burial in Sydney. Next of kin, mother, Mrs. Gorge Decker, Woodstock, White Bay, Newfoundland."

October 28, 1941 PERSONAL "Mr. and Mrs. K Brown of Salvage, B.B., recently arrived in the city on a business trip.

Mr. W.J. Frost of Hill View, is at present in the city on business.

Mr. C. Strong, of James Baird Ltd., Little Bay Islands, is in the city in connection with the interests of his firm.

Mr. Fisher is visiting the city from Bonavista.

Two sons of Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Charles Howse, Carbonear, are members of the Royal Air Force. Carl A Howse is a Pilot Officer, and William P. Howse is an Aircraftman.

Mr. W. Rolls , son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Rolls of Field Street, left on Saturday for New York, to enter the Novitiate of the Irish Christian Brothers. A talented ex pupil of St. Patrick’s Hall Schools, his many friends will congratulate and wish him success in his holy vocation. "

October 28, 1941 GOOD FISHERY AT BAY BULLS The cod fishery at Bay Bulls, up to last Saturday, had been at least fifty per cent better than the catch in the same month last year, when available. One day last week, boats secured 26,000 pounds entirely on frozen caplin. Fisherman note that codfish caught in Bay Bulls last week, had nothing in their gut except clams, and the nearest clams possibly, are on the Grand Banks.
October 28, 1941 WEDDING AT PETTY HARBOR "A very pretty wedding was solemnized at the Church of St. Joseph Sunday afternoon, when Teresa Dolorosa Healey, daughter of Philip and the late Mary Healey, was united in Bonds of Holy Matrimony to Luke Joseph, son of William Henry and Margaret Chafe.

The ceremony was performed by Very Rev. E.J. Rawlins, P.P., in the presence of a very large gathering of relatives and friends. The weather, which had been very disagreeable before noon, brightened afterwards, and there was glorious sunshine for the wedding, a happy augury.

The bride was attended by Miss Doloroas Healey as bridesmaid, while Mr. Geralad Healey acted in the capacity of best man.

The Daily new extends congratulations to the newly wedded couple, and wishes Mr. and Mrs. Chafe every happiness on their voyage over the matrimonial sea."

October 28, 1941 OBITUARY "MRS. LOUISE O’KEEFE: On Monday morning, at the residence of her daughter, Topsail Road, Mrs. Louise O’Keefe passed peacefully to eternal rest. For more than an year she had suffered patiently, and following several operations, it had been hoped that recovery would be but a matter of time. It was however, ordained otherwise, and comforted by the loving care of her children and the spiritual ministrations of Holy Mother Church, her gentle soul went forth to its eternal reward.

The widow of the late Lawrence O’Keefe, who predeceased her some twenty years ago, Mrs. O’Feefe was widely known and esteemed, particularly in the West End. Although of a retiring disposition, her interest in the different undertakings on behalf of Church and charity, was unfailing, and her generosity in every worthy cause, unbounded. Nothing gave her greater pleasure that to assist quietly, some deserving or needy cause, and many a kindness known only to its recipient, will inspire a grateful memory, of one whose first though was over for others, rather than herself.

In the circle of her home, the late Mrs. O’Keefe was a devoted mother, loving and beloved. Having the interests and associations of her children, she was to them not only a mother, but a beloved companion, and a confidant, whose loss will be irreparable. Only last month she bade good bye to her daughter, Mercedes, who left for Montreal to be married, and to her son Dermot, who resumed his studies in the Seminary at Ottawa, and for them, the realization that this unknowingly was a last farewell, will make their sorrow all the more poignant.

Left to mourn are three daughters, Mrs. William Mulrooney, and Alma at home, and Mercedes, (Mrs. Max Badcock) in Canada, and Bernard at home, and Dermot at Ottawa; three sisters, Rev. Sr. M Francis of St. Patrick’s Convent, Miss May O’Toole, and Mrs. R.E. Costello of Montreal, and one brother James.

The funeral will take place from the residence of her daughter, 47 Topsail Road, tomorrow, Wednesday afternoon. “Eternal rest grant unto her, O Lord, And let perpetual light shine upon her.”

ALEXANDER MOATT CAMPBELL: After a brief illness, Alexander Moatt Campbell, Victualler, entered into rest at 10:45, at his residence, 350 Water Street. The deceased, who was 53 years old, was born at St. John’s, son of the late William and Jane Campbell, and was educated at the Methodist College. Graduating from the College, he entered the business of his father, and after whose death in 1934, carried on the business in his own name up to yesterday.

The business, which had been so successfully carried on by the father of the deceased, has been greatly widened, and customers all over the city were catered to, by the firm. A man who devoted his time to his business and family, yet the deceased was an old cricketer, and took a greatest interest in horses and horse racing and in the season, very seldom missed the partridge shooting. He was a member of Lodge Tasker, No. 454 S.C., A.F. & A.M.

Besides his wife, he leaves to mourn one son, James, in the Engineering Department of the Newfoundland Railway, and one daughter Patricia, a brother, John W., Merchant of Wakefield, Mass., three sisters, Mrs. W.S. King, residing in Texas, Mrs E.P. Ward, and Mrs. H.J. Russell of St. John's.

The funeral takes place tomorrow, Wednesday, at 2:30 pm., from his residence, 350 Water Street."

October 28, 1941 ENGAGEMENT Mr. and Mrs. William Wickford Lanigan, of 92 Fairmont Street, Arlington, Mass., announced the engagement of their daughter, Agnes Louise, to Frank A Bouchie, son of Mrs. Marie Bouchie of Kingston Street, West Somerville, at an informal tea held at the Hotel Shearton.
October 28, 1941 DEATHS "CAMPBELL — Passed peacefully away 10.45 p.m. Monday, October 27th, Alexander Moatt Campbell. He leaves to mourn, wife, one son James and one daughter, Patricia. Funeral by motor hearse 2.30 p.m. Wednesday, October 29th, from his late residence, 360 Water St.

O’KEEFE — Passed peacefully away yesterday morning, Louise, widow of the late Lawrence O’Keefe, leaving to mourn four sons, three daughters, one brother, three sisters, and a large circle of friends. Funeral at 2.15 p.m. tomorrow, Wednesday, from her daughter’s residence, 47 Avalon Terrace, Topsail Road."


October 30, 1941 OBITUARY "MRS. MARY MURPHY: The passing of Mrs. Mary Murphy , which occurred yesterday, was heard of with much regret by the many who knew her and held her in high esteem.

The relict of the late James Murphy, who predeceased her only six months ago, Mrs. Murphy was a lady who lived a very quite and retiring life. The mother of a large family, she concerned herself with little outside of her immediately circle, but she always had time to act the good neighbour wherever anyone was in need of her service. She was of that fine type of Newfoundland lady who is never happier than in doing good for someone who needed it.

For some time past, she had not been in good health, and the death of her husband, such a short time ago, came as a distinct shock to her. In her last moments she had the consloation of having around her the members of her family to whom she was so devoted. A devoted member of her Church, she died fortified by its Holy rites, at peace with the world even as she had lived.

To her seven sons and three daughters, as well as one sister, the sympathy of many friends will be extended. Her funeral takes place at 2.30 p.m. tomorrow from her late residence, 64 Brazil’s Square."

October 30, 1941 MARRIAGES YOUNG — PIERCEY: At St. Thomas’s Church, Wednesday October 29th, by the Rev. Canon Howitt, Edna, daughter of Mr. R. And the late Mrs. Piercey of New Perlican, to John, son of Mr. and Mrs. M Young Temple, Coombe, Somerset England.
October 30, 1941 DEATHS "CLARKE — Passed peacefully away on October 29th, Mary Clarke, darling wife of Patrick Clarke, who is now serving overseas with the Nfld. Forestry Unit; leaving to mourn their sad loss, husband, 2 daughters, 1 son, 2 brothers. Funeral Saturday at 2.30 p.m., from her late residence 22 Casey Street.

MURPHY — Passed peacefully away at 5 o’clock yesterday morning, at her residence, 64 Brazil’s Square, Mary, aged 70 years, relict of James Murphy; leaving to mourn, seven sons, three daughters and one sister. Funeral on Friday, at 2.30 p.m. from her late residence.

WHITE — Passed peacefully away on October 29th, after a long illness, Thomas, beloved son of Helen and the late Martin White, leaving to mourn their sad loss, are a wife, one daughter, three sisters, Mrs. James Foran and Mrs. Anna Woods of Hoboken New York, and Mrs. Ray Walsh, one brother, Mr. Jack White of this city. Funeral on Friday ay 2.30 p.m., from his late residence, 8 William Street. R.I.P."

October 30, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "A twenty four year old man from Deer Lake, is at present on remand in the Grand Falls gaol. He was arrested by Constable Williams on request of Sergeant Dwyer of Botwood. The man is charged with the larceny of goods and cash, from the bunk house of the Atlas Construction Co. at Botwood. The amount involved is learned to be $75.00. — Grand Falls Advertiser.

The Newfoundland Times states that a strike of C.I.O. workers at Robbins Dry Dock, Brooklyn, on October 10th., affected many Newfoundland employees for that concern.

The Child Welfare Association Annual Hallowe’en Sale and Bridge will be held today, at Bishop Feild College Hall. The sale will be held in the morning and will open at 10.30. Bridge will be played in the afternoon at 3 o’clock. Morning coffee will be served.

The express leaving this evening ---- Boston Police Force, a former Newfoundlander, is a special Aide of the Superintendent of Police in Boston. Nfld Times.

The football game in the inter-collegiate series between the St. Bon’s and Feildians, was postponed yesterday and will now be held this afternoon if weather permits. It may decide the championship."

October 30, 1941 ODDITIES "American Population — The Census Bureau reports 150,000,000 persons now live under the United States flag, 19,000,000 of who live outside continental United States.

We are the fourth decade of the twentieth century.

There are 255 bears (black and brown) in Florida.

The nest of a humming bird is but slightly larger than an English walnut.

Less than three per cent of the area of Alaska is always under ice and snow.

Effects of the aircraft industry’s expanding facilities became evident last month, when the OPM announced that August production reached an all time high with a total of 1854 military aircraft."


November 2, 1941 OBITUARY "MRS. ELIZABETH WHITE: It is with deep regret that we chronicle the passing at Burin on October 25th, of one of the oldest residents of that settlement, in the person of Mrs. Elizabeth White.

Mrs. White had attained the age of Seventy-eight years, and her death occurred on the day immediately succeeding the twenty-fifth anniversary of the passing of her devoted husband. Her death was quite unexpected as her illness was of very short duration, and it came as a severe blow to the family, who were consoled by the presence of her nephew, Rev. Father J. Fleming, P.P. of the adjoining parish of Marystown, who administered the last Rites of the Catholic Church.

The late Mrs. White was a lady of high ideals, of outstanding charity, and her sympathy towards the distressed were unbounded, and all her aims during the years of her long life, were solely directed towards the betterment of the community in which she lived — a community which will be all the poorer in her passing.

Left to mourn are one daughter Mary, and six sons John, Leo, Patrick, Charles and Walter, residing at Burin, and Thomas living at Brooklyn, N.Y. One sister Mrs. Mary Abbott, and one brother Mr. Maurice Parsons also survive.

The funeral took place at Burin on Monday morning, October 27th., following Requiem Mass celebrated by Father Fleming. The pall-bearers being Messrs. J.J. Coady, Patrick Walsh, Vincent Reddy, John Parsons, Richard Marshall, Archibald Penney, and George J. Penney, and thus was laid to rest to await the final resurrection, one of the grand old figures in the long history of Burin, whose name will be remembered by many who were the recipients of her kindness and generosity.

Eternal rest grant unto her O Lord. May The perpetual light shine upon her. May she rest in peace."

November 2, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "A Canadian Soldier before Court yesterday, charged with being intoxicated and breaking a plate glass window in the Lily Café, was convicted and fined $16.00.

Quite a bit of codfish was offered for sale in the local markets yesterday, and most of it was of large size. The fishermen are using frozen caplin for bait.

The Overland Limited tomorrow night, will leave in two sections. All first and second class passenger will be leaving at 9 p.m., and all sleeping car passengers at 9.20

During the past week, the South Side Road from the end of the asphalt surface East to Bowring Bros. premises, was treated with tar mix, and the section to Morey’s is now being done.

A Canadian Soldier who was before Court yesterday, charged with being drunk and disorderly, was fined $15.00 and was ordered to pay $9.00 compensation for breaking a window in a taxi.

The laying of concrete inverts on the West side of Barne's Road has been completed as far as possible for the present, and during the last week, 120 feet were laid. At Barter’s Hill twenty-four feet were laid. The concrete side walk on the South side of Harvey Road will be completed in a few days.

Two Canadian Soldiers were before Court yesterday and were charged with stealing radiator mascots, aerial rods, and other equipment from cars, parked on Duckworth Street near the War Memorial. Two owners of cars gave evidence, after which the hearing was adjourned till today. The Assistant Chief of Police stated that is was likely, three or four persons would be called to identity articles.

The train leaving on Tuesday morning will make connection at Argentia for the Western route of Placentia Bay.

A Naval Rating charged with being drunk and disorderly, was fined $5.00 at the Magistrate’s Court yesterday. Another was fined $2.00.

In the Sanitary Department last week, there were twenty-five horses and their feed cost $167.90. Hay cost $66.50; oats, $99.00, and bran $6.50. Straw used cost $4.50. During the past week, sanitary employees carted 586 loads of ashes and garbage to various dumps, and they dipped and carted 107 gullies, as well as cleaning fifty-three gullies.

Today, November 1st., is a Holy Day in the R.C. Churches, and Masses will be celebrated at the same hours as on Sunday.

The women’s Auxiliary of the Blind are holding a sale of work on Wednesday next, at the Presbyterian Hall. The sale opens at 11 a.m.

The Western Star Correspondent from Summerside, states: “Some of our fishermen have begun their Fall operations and all are making rapid preparation. Penney’s boat brought in the first catch, having secured twenty tubs on Friday.”

The Service Magazine Exchange are still in need of magazines, books, games, etc., for distribution to men of the Services. Any who care to assist may leave any donation at any of the Fire Halls where they will be called for.

Annual meeting of the Curling Branch of the W.P.A. was held on Monday night and was presided over by Magistrate Short. Reports for the past year were submitted and the election of officers resulted as follows; President, Mrs. J Fisher; Vice-President Mrs. J.F. Sherren, Secretary Mrs. W. Verge; Treasurer, Mrs. A. Furlong. – Western Star.

The funeral of the late Mrs. Mary Murphy took place yesterday afternoon, from her late residence, Brazil’s Square, and was attended by a large number of mourners. The hearse was covered with floral expressions of sympathy. At the R.C. Cathedral, the prayers were recited by Rev. R.T. McGrath, and interment was at Mount Carmel Cemetery.

There was a meeting on Saturday night last at St. Patrick’s Hall, of herring fishermen and factory workers. The meeting was presided over by P. Fudge, President of the Newfoundland Labourers Union. A committee was formed to consider the various questions under consideration. The committee meet Monday afternoon and prepared a report, which was submitted to another public meeting Monday night. – Western Star."


November 3, 1941 CASUALTY REPORT "TAYLOR — Cyril Garfield, Sergeant, Can. R69562 R.C.A.F., previously reported missing as the result of air operations on the 12th October, 1941, now reported missing believe killed in action. Next of kin, mother, Mrs. Gilbert Taylor, 20 First Avenue, Grand Falls, Newfoundland.

O’ROURKE — Bartholomew, Able Seaman, JX211505, previously reported dangerously wounded on war service (September 4th, 1941) now reported removed from serious cases list. Next of kin, father, Mr. Patrick Wm. O’Rourke, Branch, Newfoundland."

November 3, 1941 NOMINAL ROLL 22ND DRAFT Royal Air Force air craft crews: PILOT: 798739 — McCarthy, Patrick Joseph. OBSERVERS: 798740 — Butler, Gordon Francis. 798741 — Cram, Reginald Harrison.

November 4, 1941 OBITUARIES "A. J. VAUDEN: GLACE BAY, Oct. 28 – Death occurred today of 80 year old Alfred John Vauden, native of Newfoundland, who has resided here for the past 12 years. The late Mr. Vauden had been confind to his bed for the past nine years and resided with his son Wilfred on Long Row.

Prior to coming to Glace Bay, the deceased was employed for some time at North Sydney, and was here for only a short time when an uncurable malady overtook him, and confined him to his bed.

Surviving are his wife and one son, Wilfred.

Remains will be forwarded to Newfoundland where interment will be made in his home town. — Sydney Post-Record.

ALBERT LOVEYS: “In the midst of life we are in death.” Truly may theses words be applied to Albert Loveys, whose death on Friday, under such tragic circumstances, came as a shock to the whole community.

Bert, as he was known to all his friends, was truly in the midst of life. A young man, he was the type that was never idle, always found something to do, and took great delight in outdoor activities. He was a home loving man, and often spoke of his “Place in the Park” and his family, which he loved dearly, and which to the mind of the writer, was his “world”.

For twenty eight years he was a faithful and trusted employee of the Department of Posts and Telegraphs, held in high esteem by all his co-workers, and though today his desk is vacant, he is with us in spirit and will be remembered for all time.

To his sorrowing widow and family, deepest sympathy is expressed, and may they find comfort in the though that though we may see him no more, “They are not dead who die in the Lord.” B.E.

FRANCES SMALLWOOD: The death of Miss Frances Smallwood occurred yesterday afternoon at the home of her nephew, Mr. J.R. Smallwood. She was 78.

Miss Smallwood was the only daughter of the late David and Julia Smallwood. She was a talented singer in her younger days, and took a prominent part in many of the notable cantatas and concerts performed under the auspices of the Congregational Church.

She was graduated by Mt. Allison College of Sackville N.B., thereafter training her for the nursing profession at Moncton Hospital. Her nursing work was done chiefly in the United States. Upon the death of her mother, she returned to St. John’s to manage her father’s household, in which her brother, Alexander, was an invalid. Following her father’s death in 1928 at the age of 90, she returned to the States, living with her brother Duncan, at Oakland, California. He died two years ago. Miss Smallwood had latterly resided with her nephew. She was a proficient artist in her younger days at Mt. Allison, and before that, taught piano lessons in St. John’s.

She leaves to mourn, two brothers, Alexander and Charles W., and a large number of nephews and nieces. The funeral takes place at 2.30. tomorrow afternoon, from 38 LeMarchant Road to the General Protestant Cemetery."

November 4, 1941 BIRTHS COLBOURNE — At the Grace Hospital on Saturday, November 1st, to Jean, wife of F.A. Colbourne, a daughter.
November 4, 1941 MARRIAGE "WILLIAMS — MARSH: The wedding took place at Holy Trinity Church, London, on Saturday, October 25th, of Helen, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Marsh, to Gunner Cecil H., eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Harold Williams of 34 Franklyn Avenue, City. Cecil is serving with the 59th Newfoundland Heavy Regiment R.A. He has three brothers serving with H.M. Forces.

NEWMAN – SKINNER: The wedding of Miss Rosaline Newman, youngest daughter of Mr. Pearce Newman, Botwood, to leading aircraftman Levi Skinner, of the Royal Air Force, took place at the Church of England, Botwood, last week. Rev. W.G. Legge officiated."

November 4, 1941 DEATHS "HANLEY — Passed peacefully away at Belvedere at 2.45 this Tuesday morning, mother Mary Phillppa Hanley.

SMALLWOOD — Died at 4 p.m. yesterday Frances, aged 78 years, daughter of the late David and Julia Smallwood. Funeral 2.30 Wednesday afternoon, from 36 LeMarchant Road. No flowers."

November 4, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "The Trade Review states that the only crude meats to show change last week was fat back pork, which was up fifty cents per barrel.

Imported potatoes are quoted at $2.65 a sack, a reduction from last week’s $3.00. Local potatoes are selling at $4.50 to $5.00 in small lots. — Nfld Trade Review.

IA taximan was before Court yesterday, charged with speeding on Water Street. The evidence was that he was doing 30 m.p.h. He was fined $7.50.

IA “No Entry” sign which was on the top of Long Street opposite the Holloway School, has been misplaced though the post is still there. As a result, a lot of traffic is going down over that incline.

Members of the Topsail Pond Association and their wives, are holding a re-union tonight at Jack Robinson’s Hostelry, Donovan’s. A partridge dinner will be served.

IThe staff of the East End Stores Ltd. with their wives and lady and gentleman friends, are holding a social function at Jack Robinson’s Hostelry, Donovan’s, tomorrow evening beginning at seven o’clock.

IMolasses is two cents and three cents higher. Why this is so is not quite clear, as molasses supplies are understood to be bought in the spring. Presumably, this is some new importation. – Nfld. Trade Review.

ITwo English Sailors were before Court yesterday, charged with being drunk and disorderly on the public street. They were fined $5.00 each.

IA shipment of coal arrived at Bell Island last week, and a shortage that was threatened, was thus relieved."


November 5, 1941 SUDDEN DEATH OF DR. STRAPP "Passed Away at Montreal Hotel, following Heart Attack. ATTACHED TO MILITIA.

A press despatch to the Daily News last midnight, contained the information that Dr. Gerald A Strapp, formerly of Harbor Grace, and latterly Medical Officer to the Newfoundland Militia in St. John’s, had been found dead in his hotel room at Montreal. Death was due to heart failure, and believed to have occurred Monday night.

The late Dr. Strapp was born 30 years ago at Harbor Grace, son of the late Dr. Walter and Margaret Strapp. He was educated at Harbor Grace and St. Bonaventure’s College, and won the Jubilee Scholarship whilst at that College. Leaving Newfoundland, he enrolled at McGill University, where he graduated in 1926. For one year he was an intern at St. John, New Brunswick Hospital, and returning, established a practice in his home town of Harbor Grace. Early this year, on the resignation of Dr. W. Templeman, he was appointed Medical Officer to the Newfoundland Militia, with offices in the Sudbury Building. He was a past Grand Knight of Dalton Council No. 1448 K of C Harbor Grace.

The deceased left St. John’s some two weeks ago, and planned to visit Boston, New York, Ottawa, and possibly Montreal, and whilst there, do some post-graduate work."

November 5, 1941 FUR TRAPPER TRAVELS FAR TO JOIN THE R.A. "Labrador Lad Leaves Coast Ahead of Winter to Get Overseas. (BY NOMAD )

A soft spoken youth of twenty-four, native of a Northern land where winter sets in early, came South as navigation closed, to join the colours.

Born and bred in Labrador where boys soon learn the ways of men in the stern school of experience, Stanley Blake of Rigolet, was a trapper in his own right a year ago. Today he is in St. John’s, learning the ways of the city for the first time, and trying to adjust himself to the strangeness of it all.

At Rigolet, where three families live around a Hudson Bay Company post, Stanley parted from home and friends when the coastal steamer called on the final trip. To get away ere winter settled in, he had to travel Northward as far as Hopedale, following the coastal run right round to St. John’s, arriving here too late to catch the latest draft.

ONE REJECTED

Another Labrador volunteer, who joined the ship at a Southern port, failed to pass his final examinations and returned to the Coast. Stanley stayed, missing his friend’s company. A Royal Artillery recruit, he will have to remain in the city until the next draft is made up. Billeted in a private home, he passed the time sightseeing and visiting the Caribou Hut.

Stanley is the son of Mr. and Mrs. John Blake, and brother of Millicent Blake, Grenfell Nurse at St. Anthony. Stanley is the second young man from Rigolet to volunteer for overseas service. The other is Max Budgell, son of Post Manager Budgell, hero of that epic journey across Labrador with the Indians.

Rigolet’s latest recruit, advises the writer, that Budgell, after completing the trip to Seven Islands, Quebec, enlisted in the Black Watch Regiment, and is at present serving in England. Jordan Goudie, of North West River, is the only other recruit from Northern Labrador serving in the Royal Artillery. About a dozen young men from Labrador are playing their part in the Royal Navy."

November 5, 1941 FISHERY GOOD AT QUIRPON PAST SEASON "One Crew of 8 Men, Landed 1200 Quintals For Summer’s Work.

Fishing operations at Quirpoon were highly successful during the past season, being the best for several years. With larger catches than usual, and fish selling at greatly increased prices, the fishermen of that section of the Northern Coast will receive very satisfactory financial returns. The weather however, was bad throughout the summer, forcing the fishermen to undergo much inconvenience and hardship. Hindered by wind, ice, snow and sleet, with scarcely ever a glimpse of the sun, the work of hauling traps was rendered doubly unpleasant.

Yet the worst feature of the unusually backward weather was the icy cold water, which caused suffering to the fishermen, whose hands became numb and swollen. But for these abnormal conditions, the fishery at Quirpon this year would have broken all records, as fish remained plentiful during the whole season, and up to the present, have shown no signs of fading away from the grounds.

The thirty one ton schooner “J E Hiscock” recently arrived in port with her third load of fish for the summer. In all, about 1200 quintals were secured by the crew consisting of 8 men. The skipper and owner, Capt. Levi Davis of Pound Cove, Bonavista Bay, contracted pneumonia at the outset of the fishing season, and gave over the command of the schooner to his son, Gus, aged twenty two. The young Captain began his career well by securing an excellent voyage, and completing the season’s operation without the slightest misfortune. Capt Levi is now recovering his health, after several months of illness."

November 5, 1941 THREE YEAR OLD VICTIM OF MOTOR ACCIDENT Ran in front of Truck Just moving Off — Dies Soon Afterward: The three year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Cluny Pottles of Mont Royal Avenue, was hit by a motor truck, owned by Ayre & Sons ltd., and driven by William Clarke of Calver Avenue. The small child ran out from the sidewalk in front of the truck as it was moving, and before the brakes could be applied, the accident occurred. The driver of the truck took the little girl to Saint Clare’s Hospital, where she was attended by Dr. Kennedy, and a very short while after entering the Hospital, she passed away.
November 5, 1941 MARRIAGE CRITCHLRY — WATTERS: The marriage of Miss Ruby Mabel Critchley, only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Critchlry of Grand Falls, Newfoundland, and Rifleman Ira Gordon Watters, son of A.W. and the late Mrs. Watters of Apohaguia N.B., Canada, was solemnized in Canada on October 1st. Rifleman Watters is a member of the Royal Rifles of Canada.
November 5, 1941 DEATHS "POTTLE — At St. Clare’s Mercy Hospital, at 12.30 p.m. Tuesday, November 4th., as a result of injuries received in a motor accident, Audrey Victoria, beloved daughter of Cluny and Matilda Pottle, aged 3 ½ years.

LASHA — Suddenly at her home in Gananague, Ontario, June 15th., Blanche, daughter of the late Patrick and Elizabeth Jane Duke, wife of Conrad Lasha, in her 38th year, leaving to mourn, husband, one daughter, Mary, two brothers and four sisters.

WALSH — Passed peacefully away yesterday morning, Elsie, wife of the late James Walsh, leaving to mourn, one son, Max, and a large circle of friends. Funeral from her late residence, 18 Summer Street, Thursday at 2.30 p.m."

November 5, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "The Trade Review states that onions were lower in price last week, but oranges showed an advance of 75 cents.

The total potato crop in the United States was estimated, on October last, as 374,583,000 bushels, compared with the final estimate of the 1940 crop at 397,722,000 bushels. Latest reports from Ottawa estimate the total Canadian crop of potatoes at 39,290,000 bushels compared with 1940 crop of 42,200,000 bushels. Nova Scotia’s crop this year is estimated by Ottawa at 2,225,000 bushels, compared with 2,313,000. New Brunswick’s crop is estimated at 5,449,000 bushels compared with 6,896,000 bushels last year. — Nfld Trade Review

Five Seamen of a foreign ship were before the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, charged with refusing to proceed to sea on a ship requisitioned by the Admiralty. The charge was dismissed.

William Young and Maxwell Sharpe, who were caught on the roof of a Water Street building in the early hours of a morning last week, were before Court yesterday. They were sentenced to four months in prison, each.

A dance will be held at the T.A. Hall tonight with music provided by Harold LaFosse and his orchestra.

A man who was before Court yesterday, charged with being drunk and assaulting Constable Smith in the discharge of his duty, was convicted and fined $10.

Sidney McVane, formerly of Grand Falls, who was arrested last week on a charge of holding up Mrs. J.C. Sapp in her store, Water Street, and attempting to rifle the cash register, was before Court yesterday. He was sentenced to six months for assault, and six months for attempting to steal, the sentences to run concurrently.

A meeting of the charter members of the Citizens Committee will be held in the Board Trade Rooms tomorrow evening at eight o’clock. The business will include adoption of the constitution, election of executive, and a discussion on the subject, “The City Manager System of Government.”

The Women’s Auxiliary of the Institute for the Blind, will hold a sale of work at the Presbyterian Hall, Queens Road, today. It will open at 11 a.m. Novelties and Christmas presents of all kinds have been made by the blind, and will be on sale, and weaving, leather goods, knitted goods, brooms, whisks, rubber mats, aprons, socks, etc., will be included in the goods offered. There will also be candy and pantry stalls, whilst morning coffee and afternoon tea will be served."


November 6, 1941 WEDDING BELLS "DULEY — PITCHER: The Church of St. John the Evangelist at Topsail, was the scene of a most attractive wedding on Wednesday evening, November 5th, at 7 o’clock, when Cyril Chancey Duley, son of the late Mr. and Mrs. T.J. Duley, was united in marriage with Florence, daughter of Mrs. and the late H.E. Pitcher. The ceremony was performed by Rev. W.A. Butler, rector of Topsail Parish.

The bride, who was given away by her uncle, Mr. S. Vavasour, was dressed in a floor length wine coloured velvet gown, with up-to-the-neck lace bodice and a small feather flower hat to match, and carried a bouquet of pink carnations and fern. The bridesmaid, Miss Gladys Macfarlane, wore a victory blue crepe full length gown, with full skirt and tight fitting jacket, trimmed with silver pom poms and a small feather hat to match, and carried a bouquet of mauve chrysthanemums. Mr. H.R. Brooks was best man. The bride’s mother wore a navy crepe gown with wine coloured velvet hat, and a corsage of roses and carnations. Miss Margaret Duley, sister of the groom, wore a black lace afternoon dress with silver fox fur, with hat of black silk, trimmed with black pom poms and a corsage of carnations and violets.

The reception was held at Woodstock, where a company of about 60 were entertained at a partridge dinner. Rev. W.A. Butler, proposing the toast to the bride and groom, referred to the groom’s service in the Royal Newfoundland Regiment and his great interest in welfare work.

After a very enjoyable hour or so, the bride, whose going away costume was on odenile green ensemble with red fox fur, and the groom, departed on their honeymoon amidst showers of good wishes of their friends for their long happiness.

The Church of St. John the Evangelist, with its lovely setting, was decorated with autumn leaves and white chrysthanemums, and formed a lovely background for the wedding ceremony. Mr. Alan Pittman was organist, and whilst the bride and groom were signing the register, Miss Marjorie Dalton sang “O Perfect Love.”"


November 7, 1941 OBITUARY "HAZEL SOMERTON: On Monday, Sept. 29th., Hazel Somerton passed peacefully away at the Grace Hospital. For seven years she suffered patiently. Her nursing career untimely shortened by illness, she became the ideal patient. Her smile will never be forgotten. The writer deeply sympathizes with the bereaved parents at this hour of sorrow. The many floral tributes expressed the sympathy of all those who were privileged to know and love Hazel.

It is difficult to comprehend death, especially when it cuts short the promising, young, and beautiful life. In the school the teacher gives a problem with one or more unknown quantities to solve. In later life we face unknown quantities on a larger scale. Death is one we cannot solve.

We only know that, “Behind the dim unknown, Standeth God within the shadow, Keeping watch above His Own.” The Great Teacher will some day balance the equation and solve the unknown for us. We cannot know, by faith we trust in the promises of God. Death is not an end; it is a beginning; We shall see our loved ones again because we live, “In hope that sheds a shining ray Far down the future’s broadening way.” E.J. "


November 8, 1941 MEMORIAM PERKS — In loving memory of Harold Joseph Perks, who died November 8th 1935. R.I.P.
November 8, 1941 NOTE OF THANKS Mrs. Samuel Clarke and family, of Victoria, wish to thank all the kind friends who sent wreaths, telegrams, letters, and cards, or helped in any way in their sad bereavement. They especially wish to thank Rev. Mr. Moore, Dr. Simms, the Matron and Nurses of the Sanatorium, for the kindness and attention shown their dear daughter and sister, Bertha, while a patient at that institution.
November 8, 1941 FUNERAL NOTICE STRAPP — The funeral of the late Capt. Gerald A. Strapp, M.D., will take place at Harbor Grace on Tuesday, 11th November, at 2.30 p.m., from the residence of Mr. Edward D. Freeman.
November 8, 1941 DEATHS "KELLEHER — Suddenly yesterday morning, at 51 Warbury St., Minnie Jane, wife of Harry M. Kelleher of New York. Interment in Main, U.S.A. STANFORD — Died at 9 p.m. Friday, Nov. 7th., Rose, the beloved wife of Stephen Stanford; left to mourn their sad loss, are husband, two sons, and two daughters, also one brother and one sister. Funeral on Sunday at 2.15 p.m., from her late residence, 61 Avalon Terrace, Topsail Road. R.I.P."
November 8, 1941 OBITUARY "MRS. STEPHEN STANFORD: After an illness of several months, borne with Christian resignation to the Divine Will, the soul of Mrs. Rose Stanford winged its flight to meet its Creator, at nine o’clock last night.

The wife of Mr. Stephen Stanford, the widely known Stewart on the Newfoundland Railway, the deceased had been ill for some time, but there was hope that medical skill and the kind and loving attention of her family, would be able to restore the fading health. Hopes, however, were shattered, and yesterday it was evident that the end was near.

Throughout all the time of her suffering, Mrs. Stanford uttered no complaint, and her only regret at passing from this world was not for herself, but for her family. Kindly, charitable, and always the ideal neighbour, she will be mourned by many who have cause to remember her because of her good deeds. She was interested in all that was of a philanthropic nature, whilst Church was ever foremost in her mind, and it was a great consolation to her to have the Last Holy Rites in her lingering moments.

Left to mourn beside her husband, are two sons and two daughters as well as one sister, Miss Agnes Crowe, and one brother, Mr. Fred Crowe, of the Standard Bedding Co. To all, deepest sympathy will be extended. The funeral takes place tomorrow at 2.15 p.m. from her late residence 61 Avalon Place, Topsail Road."

November 8, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "During last week, stone dust was laid on the sidewalks in Barnes Rd., Southside Rd., Cabot St., Military Rd., Temperance St., Gower St., Parade St., and Church Hill.

A Canadian Soldier was before the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, charged with being drunk, and having in his possession a part bottle of liquor, on which there was a defaced label. He was fined $10.00.

Four men of the Mercantile Marines were before the Magistrate’s Court yesterday and were charged with being drunk and disorderly and obstructing the Police in the discharge of their duty. Three were fined $5.00 each and the fourth was fined $2.00.

A resident of Old Perlican appeared before Judge Browne at the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, charged with stealing a motor car and with operating it whilst drunk. The car, which was owned by a man named Strong, was taken to a garage for repairs. The accused it is alleged, took the car without the owner’s consent, and crashed it into a pole. He was convicted and remanded for sentence."


November 11, 1941 WEDDING AT PETTY HARBOR "DOYLE — ST. GEORGE: In the R.C. Church at Petty Harbor, at five o’clock yesterday, Sunday afternoon, the wedding of William J. Doyle, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Doyle, to Miss Mary St. George, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John St. George, of Carbonear, was duly solemnized by the Rev. Fr. E.J. Rawlins, P.P.

The ceremony was attended by a large number of friends of the contracting parties. Mr. Gerald Doyle acted as best man and the bridesmaid was Miss Ann St. George. A wedding supper was served at 6 p.m. when the immediate friends of the contracting parties was present."

November 11, 1941 CASUALTY REPORT "EARLE — Robert Clarence, Able Seaman, PJX188879 R.N. Missing, presumed killed on war service. Next of kin, Mother, Mrs. Henry Earle, Portugal Cove, St. John’s East, Newfoundland.

FORBES — Ralph Morrison, Able Seaman, PJX188884 R.N. Missing, presumed killed on war service. Next of kin, Mother, Mrs. Minnie Forbes, 242 Hamilton Avenue, St. John’s, Newfoundland."

November 11, 1941 PERSONAL "Mr. L. Shaw, B.A., Secretary for Education, left the city by yesterday’s express en route to Sackville N.B. Canada, to attend a meeting of the Common Examining Board of the Maritime Provinces and Newfoundland, at Mount Allison University, on Wednesday and Thursday of this week. On Friday, Mr. Shaw will also attend a conference of the Central Advisory Committee on Education. This committee is composed of the heads of Educational Departments and Universities throughout Canada and Newfoundland.

Mr. G. LeDrow of Broad Cove, Bay de Verde, is at present in the city on business.

Miss P. LeGrow of broad Cove, is visiting friends in the city.

Miss E. Halliday is spending a short vacation in the city.

Mr. J.T. Walters recently arrived in town from Petley on Business.

Rev. S.W. and Mrs. Williams of Clarke’s Beach, spent last week visiting friends at Catalina.

Miss Margaret Duley, noted Newfoundland Novelist, left last evening for New York where she will make her home.

Prof. L.W. Shaw, Dr. H.L. Pottle, and Miss Cherrington, left last evening for Sackville, N.B. where they will attend meetings of the Maritime Examination Board and the Carnegie Foundation."

November 11, 1941 NOT PREPARED TO MAKE STATEMENT Labrador Mining and Exploration Co., is stated to be negotiating with a large Canadian mining company, for finances to carry out further work on its extensive iron deposits in Labrador, outlined by work carried out over a number of years. Estimates of up to 70 millions tons of high grade ore have been made. (Mr. Claude Howse, Associate Geologist, Newfoundland Geological Survey, asked as to plans of the above company, was not prepared to make a statement.)
November 11, 1941 WEDDING BELLS "MacDONALD — KENNEDY: On Saturday, November 8th, at 3 p.m., at the Chapel of St. Bride’s College, Littledale, the wedding took place of Miss Madeline Mary Kennedy, younger daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Kennedy of this city, to Mr. Donald Lawrence MacDonald, son of Mrs. and the late Daniel M. MacDonald of Sydney Mines, Cape Breton. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. Father Michael J. Kennedy who was assisted by Rev. Fr. J.J. St. John, and Rev. Fr. Francis Bradshaw with Master Thomas McNamara as Altar Boy.

The bride wore a gown of faconne crepe, and her tulle veil fell from an Elizabethan head dress. She carried a bouquet of white chrysanthemums shaded with pink. She entered the Church with her father. The wedding March was sung by Miss Joan McNamara to organ accompaniment. The bride was attended by her sister, Mrs. Frank McNamara Jr., as matron of honour, and by Miss Helen O’Driscoll and Miss Agnes Godden as bridesmaids. The matron of honour wore a gown of blue violet chiffon cut on princess lines, with a hat of the same shade trimmed with velvet roses. The bridesmaids wore gowns of ashes of rose chiffon, fashioned with velvet jackets. The same material was used for the head dress of an old English design. The bouquets of the matron of honour and bridesmaids, were tiny chrysanthemiums in pastel shades. The bride’s mother chose a gown of Eleanor blue, with hat of the same colour, and corsage of pink lilies. The groom’s sister, Miss Marie MacDonald, came from her home for the wedding. She wore a powder blue chiffon gown with a corsage of deep pink carnations. Mr. Bernard Summers was best man. The ushers were Dr. Arthur B. Kennedy, Mr. Frank McNamara, Jr., and Mrs George T Dyer.

At the conclusion of the ceremony, Miss Joan McNamara sang Gounods Ava Maria. The reception was held at Woodstock, Topsail. Going away, the bride wore an ensemble of Marina Blue, the coat being tinted with Kolinsky .

The bride and groom left by Sunday’s express. They will spend their honeymoon in Montreal and make their future home in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia."

November 11, 1941 DEATHS "MURPHY — Passed peacefully away at 12.20 a.m. November 10th., 1941, Helen Josephine, aged 24 years, third daughter of John J. and Minnie Murphy, leaving, father, mother, two sisters, three brothers, one at present overseas in the Navy. Funeral on Wednesday 2.30 p.m. from 11 LeMarchant Road.

STONE — Passed peacefully away early Sunday morning, James A Stone (Cooper), in his 87th year, leaving to mourn six sons, 1 daughter, 26 grandchildren and 13 great-grandchildren. Funeral today, Monday, 2.30 p.m. from his son’s residence, corner Avalon and Goodridge Street. (Boston paper please copy)

TAYLOR — Passed peacefully away at 3.15 a.m. Sunday, Fraser Taylor in his 77th year ; left to mourn his sad losses are a wife, two sons, and 11 grandchildren. Funeral Tuesday, at 2.30 p.m. from his son’s residence, Mr. Charles Taylor , O’Dea’s Lane, top of Prince of Wales Street.

STAMP — Passed peacefully away on November 9th., Joseph Stamp, aged 85 years, leaving to mourn wife, 1 son, 2 brothers, 2 step-brothers and 2 grandchildren. Funeral Tuesday at 2.30 p.m., from his late residence, Top Battery Road.– R.I.P."

November 11, 1941 FUNERALS STEPHEN STANFORD: The funeral of the late Mrs. Stephen Stanford took place yesterday afternoon from her late residence, Topsail Road. The attendance was very large and the number of wreaths which were sent, were evidence of the esteem in which the deceased and her family were held. At the R.C. Cathedral, the prayers were recited by Rev. J.J. Murray. Interment was at Mount Camel Cemetery.
November 11, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "Last week was a particularly good one for fishermen at Summerside, and most of the boats secured loads daily.

Tomorrow, Remembrance Day, will be a general holiday with the business places. It will be the last holiday until Christmas Day. Half holiday will continue till the end of this month.

A memorial service will be held at the War Memorial in Curling tomorrow morning at 11 o’clock. Tomorrow night the annual Armistice Night Dance will be held at Glynn Mill Inn.

At Mount Cashel tomorrow morning at nine o’clock, solemn High Mass of Requiem will be celebrated for the repose of the souls of all deceased ex-service men and members of the Mount Cashel Old Boys Association.

The annual meeting of the women’s Patriotic Association will be held in the Grenfell Hall, Caribou Hut on Tuesday, December 9th., at 8.15 p.m. Representatives of out of town branches will be welcomed.

A resident of Old Perlican, who was charged with stealing a car and driving it whilst he was under the influence of liquor, was fined $5.00 at the Magistrate’s Court on Saturday.

The Newfoundland Protective Association of Shop and Office Employees, are holding a card party on Thursday night at the T.A. Hall for the purpose of raising funds to send Christmas gifts to members who are overseas. Valuable prizes have been offered.

A Meeting of the Newfoundland Graduate Nurses Association, which was to have been held tomorrow night, has been postponed until next Tuesday."


November 12, 1941 BIRTHS REID — On November 10th at Grace Hospital, to Mr. and Mrs. Albert Reid, a daughter (Still Born)
November 12, 1941 MARRIAGE KALANZ – TURNER: At Manuels on Nov. 1st by Rev. R.A. St. John, P.P., Mary, daughter of the late John and Mary Turner of this city, to Andrew, son of George and Mary Kalanz of New York, N.Y.
November 12, 1941 DEATHS "MURPHY — Passed peacefully away at 12.20 a.m., November 10th, 1941, Helen Josephine, aged 24 years, third daughter of John J. and Minnie Murphy; leaving father, mother, two sisters, three brothers, one at present overseas in the Navy. Funeral today Wednesday, at 2.30 p.m., from 11 LeMarchant Road.

GODDEN — Passed peacefully away Tuesday 11th November, Thomas J Godden in his 85th year; leaving to mourn, two sons, two daughters, as well as two grandchildren. The funeral takes place at 2.30 p.m., Thursday from his late residence, 47 Freshwater Road.

HARTERY — Passed peacefully away on Tuesday, Nov. 11th., at St. Clare’s Mercy Hospital, fortified by the Rites of the Holy Catholic Church, Catherine, beloved daughter of Mrs. Mary and the late William Hartery, leaving to mourn their sad loss, mother, two sisters, Mae and Margaret. The funeral takes place from her late residence, 223 Craigmillar Avenue. May the Sacred heart of Jesus have mercy on her soul."

November 12, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "A Taximan was before Court on Monday, charged with being in possession of a package of cigarettes, on which there were no Customs Excise Stamp. The hearing was postponed till Saturday.

A motor car driver who was before the Magistrate’s Court on Monday, charged with driving at the rate of 40 m.p.h. on LeMarchant Road, was fined $20.00.

The Trade Review states; “Advances of one dollar per barrel are seen in some grades of barrelled beef. Rolled oats in bags are up ten cents. Other prices remain unchanged.”

Three drivers of motor vehicles were before Court on Monday, charged with driving whist under the influence of liquor. One case will be heard tomorrow, and the other two were postponed until Thursday.

A taximan was before Court on Monday, and was charged with taking all the curves on Topsail Hill, going West from Woodstock, at 40 m.p.h., as well as passing approaching cars at an excessive speed. He was fined $15.00.

Another accident occurred on the Beach Hill recently, when a car owned and driven by Thomas Rees, went over the high bank into the cut, half way down the hill. The engine stalled, and in backing, the car went over the narrow road and fell into the droke. Fortunately, none of the occupants were injured. This is the fourth car that has gone over at this place. – The Bell Islander

The Trade Review states that no change appears in the sugar market, and it is expected that the present inactivity will exist for some time. Many factors go towards maintaining this situation, which is primally due to the fact that supplies of raw sugar growth within the Empire, have been bought up by the Government of Great Britain. The price set by the Sugar Administrator for the Canadian markets, has been maintained for almost a year and a half.

A Grand Falls Taxi Driver’s case, against a Windsor motorist for damage, was heard at Grand Falls last week. The accident happened a fortnight ago on Botwood Road, when the defendant crashed into the taxi, which was parked at the time, waiting for a passenger. Damages to the extent of $170.00 were claimed. Three witnesses were called by the plaintiff, including Constable Abbott, who had been called to the scene of the accident. Mr. Hawco called one witness for the defendant, after which His Honour dismissed the claim. – Grand Falls Advertiser"


November 13, 1941 IN MEMORIAM "CAPT. GERALD A STRAPP, M.D.: On Tuesday evening, November 4th., the friends and colleagues of the late Dr. Gerald Strapp were stunned to learn of his sudden passing in Montreal. It seemed incredible, unreal, absurd, that one so full of life as Gerry, should pass away so quickly, so soon. An obvious case of silly cruel rumour. But alas, for once she was no lying jade, but sombre, tragic truth. Even now that he has been consigned to Mother Earth, it seems incredible that we shall never hear again, the quick step that signalled his approach, that we shall wait in vain to hear that eager, vital voice, or see again that well-known smile, which seemed to pause expectant in the wings, when it did not occupy the stage that was his eager, nobil face. For here was no sluggish, plodding mind, but one attuned to every passing phase, that missed no nuance in conversation, however fleet or subtle, yet withal, was unobtrusive, diffident, and content to let the others do the talking.

Calm, confident, able, painstakingly kind, he will be sadly missed by those to whom he tended. Utterly honest, almost fanatically scrupulous, and tolerant to a fault, he will be long mourned by those who had the privilege to call him friend. Almost monastic personally in his asceticism and temperance, one sought in vain in Gerry, the slightest hint of conscious superiority to the common run of man. Wise beyond his years perhaps, and on the surface, with but small cause for worry, yet one sensed in him a pathetic loneliness beneath the mask of gaiety, a subconscious craving for advice and sympathy, which his conscious self was far too proud to own. A sympathetic auditor to the woes of others, he was much too shy, too diffident, to obtrude his own. Essentially when all is said, alone, aloof, his solitary heartrending death amongst strangers, far from his own land, has about it perhaps, a symbolic significance, which others may attempt to fathom. For us who knew him well, the mere stark fact emerges, that he is gone, and we are bereft, with our dear good frined.

Perhaps, who knows, it was of some such friend as Gerry that Menander wrote in 343 B.C.

“Whom the gods love die young; that man is blest who having viewed at ease this solemn show of sun, stars, ocean, fire, doth quickly go back to his home with calm, uninured breast. Be life short, or long, 'tis manifest.”"

November 13, 1941 NOTE OF THANKS William L. Pearcey and sisters, wish to thank all those who sent wreaths, cards, letters, and telegrams of sympathy, and for all acts of kindness, in the sudden passing of their dear brother, Samuel B. Pearcey.
November 13, 1941 IN MEMORIAM "LAWLOR — In loving memory of Agnes Lawlor (of St. Thomas’s) who was drowned in the Garland disaster Nov. 10th, 1940.

Time cannot sever, as the years roll on, thy gentle voice, sweet smile and song. The autumn breeze from the ocean deep seems to whisper a lullaby of thy peaceful sleep.

Thy pure young life is past and gone, as death come softly stealing on. One sweet, sad thought my memory fill, This loved one’s memory lingers still. Inserted by Mr. P.J. Kent, East End, Bell Island."

November 13, 1941 DEATHS TERERISE — Passed peacefully away at Brigus, Nov. 11th, Ellen Tererise; left to mourn, are one son, William, serving overseas in His Majesty’s Navy, also 2 daughters, Mrs. Dan Kelly and Mrs. Agnes Fahey, also 3 sisters and 3 brothers, and 7 grandchildren. May the Sacred Heart of Jesus have mercy on her soul. R.I.P. (Boston and U.S.A. papers please copy.)
November 13, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "A young Canadian from Ontario, was taken to Grand Falls recently, by Sergt. Dwyer of Botwood, on charge of vagrancy. He had left his ship in St. John’s and had walked across the country as far as Botwood. He stated he had wanted a holiday, and had taken it upon himself to leave without permission. He said he was quite comfortable in the Grand Falls gaol, and the food was excellent there. He was sent back to St. John’s. — Grand Falls Advertiser.

A resident of New Gower Street was before the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, charged with failing to comply with A.R.P. Regulations on the night of the blackout, two week ago. Evidence was that there was a light showing in an upstairs room window. The accused said that his wife and himself went to a party in the country, before the blackout started, and they forgot to turn out the light. That was not taken as an excuse. A fine of $2.00 was imposed."


November 16, 1941 NEW MELBOURNE NOTES "Two Events Are Held To Mark education Week. Special Night Meeting and Open Session at the School.

NEW MELBOURNE, Oct. 30. “Tis Fall in Terra Nova. That will set you pulses leaping. When the dogberries have ripened, and the year is growing old. When the maple stands in splendour like a king arrayed for battle, when the bracken fades to russet, and the birches turn to gold.” — E.C. Barrett.

October is the living picture of the world quoted above, the countryside is ablaze with vivid colours. This is the month also for harvesting, and vegetables of all kinds are carefully cellared for winter consumption. There are some complaints of shortage of potatoes, but generally speaking, crops are fair.

Education week was observed here by a special meeting on the night of 28th., and by an open session of the School on Friday afternoon. Mr. C.G.M. Button was Chairman of the meeting, and addresses were given by Rev. C.E. Peacock and by Mr. Eric S. Gulliford, the Teacher. Both speakers outlined thoroughly the fundamentals of a good education, and both appealed to the parents to send their children of legal age to school. Regular attendance too, is to be desired. Spasmodic attendance is unfair to children and to Teacher, and progress is impeded by such. The address were very fine, and we hope that all though the year there will be displayed much interest and co-operation, so that the term might ultimately result in success, and a real love for learning.

On Friday afternoon, Mr. Gulliford received the visitors in the school room. A pleasant time was spent, and the children were eager to perform.

REID — IVANY: During this month, Mr. Roy Reid of New Melbourne, was married to Miss Bella Ivany of English Harbor. The ceremony was performed by Rev. H.M. Dawe, B.A., B.D., at Cochrane Street Church, St. John’s. A reception was held and a delightful time was enjoyed. Mr. and Mrs. Reid later returned to New Melbourne, where they spent a few days, and have now gone to English Hr., their future home. We wish them much happiness as they travel life’s road together.

MILLS — BURSEY: On October 21st., at Old Perlican, the wedding of Miss Hennie Mills of Old Perlican, and Mr. Lionel Bursey of New Melbourne, took place. Rev. F. Mitchinson officiated. A reception was held at the home of the bride’s parents and a large number of guests enjoyed an entertaining evening. Mr. and Mrs. Bursey motored to New Melbourne next day, and will make their future home there. Their friends wish for them many years of happiness in their wedded life.

Mr. Elisha Button, J.P., who spent an extended visit here with relatives and friends, has now returned to his home at St. John’s. Miss Marjorie E. Button, his daughter, is commended by her many friends, on the excellent manner in which she replied to Sergeant Miller’s misleading article, on conditions as they exist in St. John’s. Miss Button is at present in Ottawa, Canada.

Mrs. William Durdle has gone to St. John’s to enter the General Hospital for treatment.

Miss Marjorie Pynn is visiting at St. John’s.

Mrs. W.J. Button spent a three week visit with her daughter, Mrs. D.W.K. Dawe at St. John’s, during this month.

Mrs. Robertson, (nee Miss Florence Driscoll) from St. John’s, is spending a few weeks here with her sister.

Mr. Max Goodwin, Mrs. N.G. Reid, Mrs. Bessie Goodwin and Miss Margaret Harris were visitors to St. John’s during the month.

Mrs. George Woodland spent a short time at Grate’s Cove during recent days.

We have a few sick people in our community, of whom special mention should be made. In some cases the illness is not serious. The remaining sick are confined to their beds for week after week. On the whole, the health of the people is good, and we hope will continue so throughout the winter months.

A number of men who were working at the Nfld. Airport for several months, arrived home last week. Others who have been at home, have gone to Argentia for employment. MELBA."

November 16, 1941 DEATHS GROUCHY — Passed peacefully away at 5.30 p.m., on November 13th., Elizabeth (May) Chidley, wife of Robert J. Grouchy; leaving to mourn husband, three sons, one daughter, also her mother in Boston, and large circle of friends. Funeral on Sunday at 2.45 p.m., from her late residence, 82 Barnes Road. R.I.P.
November 16, 1941 IN MEMORIAM "PENNEY — In loving memory of our dear son Gerald Penney, who passed away at the Grace Hospital, St. John’s, November 16th, 1938.

A loving one from us is gone, A child we loved so well. A place left vacant in our home, That never can be filled.

Inserted by his mother and father, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Penney, Bell Island.

PENNEY — in loving memory of Gerald Penney, who passed away on November 16th, 1938 at the Grace Hospital, St. John’s.

Dearest Gerald, how we miss you, Never will your memory fade. Loving thoughts will always linger, Around the grave where you are laid.

Inserted by Mrs. W. Janes and family, Bell Island."

November 16, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "A truck driver was before Court yesterday, charged with driving a car whilst in an intoxicated condition. He pleaded not guilty, and after some evidence was taken, the hearing was adjourned till Monday.

The Fire Department were called yesterday morning, to the store of R.A. Templeton, Water Street. Some paper had ignited in the basement and caused a minor blaze, which however, was quenched before much damage was done.

During the past couple of nights, Parson’s Garage, King’s Road, was broken into twice, and three cars were taken from there. Two were recovered, but the third, a 1938 Ford Coupe, was not located up to last evening.

A Magisterial Enquiry into the cause of the fatal accident on Quidi Vidi Road on the morning of October 27th., when a Truckman was killed by a motor truck, opened yesterday afternoon, before Magistrate O’Neill. Assistant Chief of Police, Strange, is conducting the enquiry."

November 16, 1941 ODDITIES "Just “Hear” and there — London – A woman who interrupted a Parliamentary debate by remarking, “hear hear”, was courteously but firmly escorted from the House of Commons Gallery.

Cunningham Stays — New Delhi — Sir George Cunningham has been re-appointed Governor of the North West Frontier Province, India, another two years.

Nine Died, Nine Lived — Portemourth — A.V Alexander, First Lord of the Admiralty, in tribute to Britain's Merchant Seamen, told how nine mere kept alive for 15 days on a raft, with only three teaspoonfuls of water daily, while nine others died.

Motor league kitchen – London — Viscount Bennett, former Prime Minister of Canada, presented a mobile kitchen for the service, to the Countess of Bessborough, President of the Canadian Women’s Club in London, on behalf of the Ontario Motor League.

For Chewing On — Chicle, which comes from Central America and Yuctan, is the basis of chewing gum.

Younger Chicago — Chicago was incorporated a village in 1832, a city in 1837, when the population was 4,170.

Trainless Town — Some 48,000 American communities are entirely dependent upon motor trucks for their supplies.

Air Fleet Mothers — The American Navy has 6 Aircraft Carriers, while 12 are under construction.

One Sweet Job — Approximately 75 per cent of the people of Cuba raise sugar cane for a living.

Historians say, King Cheops of Egypt employed 100,000 people for twenty years, to complete his enormous tomb."


November 17, 1941 OBITUARY "MRS. MARY ANN COLLINS: There was general regret yesterday, when announcement of the sudden death of Mrs. Mary Ann Collins was made generally know.

Deceased had not been complaining of feeling any worse than usual, and on Saturday afternoon, went as she always did, to do some business, or what was more likely, to engage in some work of charity for which she was noted, and to which she devoted most of her time for some years past. Returning, she had just reached the top of the stairs in her home and had inserted the key in her door, when she fell. Assistance of Mr. and Mrs. Morrisey who lived in the same house, and of Mrs. Lacey next door, was immediate, and they saw that Mrs. Collins had been called to reap the reward for her many good deeds. Spiritual help was summoned, and within a short time the deceased had entered into Eternal Rest.

The widow of the late District Inspector Collins, there was no lady in St. John’s who was more widely known than was she. Her chief interest was in doing good for others, and the number of charitable works she performed will never be known on this side of Eternity. Her Church and the poor, were her only interests in life, and may prayers will be offered for the repose of her soul, by many who have cause to remember her goodness.

Her funeral takes place this afternoon at 2.30, from her late residence, 11 Holloway Street."

November 17, 1941 IN MEMORIAM "SOMERTON — In memory of Ethel, darling daughter of Andrew and Louisa Somerton, who passed away at the Grace Hospital, November 16th 1934.

For she was treasure greater far than East or West unfold; and her rewards more precious are, than all their stores of gold.

Inserted by her parents."

November 17, 1941 DEATHS "BONNELL — Passed peacefully away at Corner Brook, Saturday, November 15th., Jean, beloved wife of Louis W. Bonnell, leaving to mourn, husband and one brother. Funeral will take place on Tuesday at 2.30 p.m., from the residence of her brother, Mr. John Cook, 46 Springdale Street.

COLLINS — Passed peacefully away, suddenly at 6 p.m. on the 15th November, Mary Ann Collins, widow of the late William Collins, District Inspector, Newfoundland Constabulary. The funeral takes place today, Monday, at 2.30 p.m., from her late residence, 11 Holloway Street; May her soul rest in peace."

November 17, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "A van driver was before Court on Saturday, charged with passing approaching vehicles on Topsail Road, at 35 m.p.h., and also with having no tail light on his van. He was fined $5.00.

A special train, tomorrow morning at 8.30, will make connection at Argentia for the Western route of Placentia Bay.

Andrew Luby Jr., who was arrested on the premises of E.O’D Kelly Ltd., early Saturday morning, as reported in Saturday’s News, appeared before the Magistrate’s Court on a charge with attempting to steal. He was remanded.

Five motorists who were before Court on Saturday, charged with driving without tail lights, were fined $3.00 each.

The annual pre-Christmas series of card tournaments with turkeys as prizes, will begin at the K of C Rooms on Thursday night. Members may invite their friends.

The Newfoundland Times states that Mr. John O’Toole of Brooklyn, formerly of St. John’s East, will be married on November 15th in Barchmont, N.Y. His bride-to-be is Miss Joan Kensington of the U.S. Army Nurse Corp.

A man who was before the Magistrate’s Court on Saturday, charged with stealing from tents at Camp Alexander, was sentenced to six weeks imprisonment with option of a fine of $50.00. The evidence was that he took personal belongings of soldiers, these included a wallet and some shooting medals. All the stolen property was recovered.

Miss Alice Lundrigan of Jamaica L.I., was recently tendered a shower by Miss Hilda Bambrick of Brooklyn, who is to be Miss Lundrigan's bridesmaid at her coming marriage to Mr. John F. Gillis of New York, but whose parents Mr. and Mrs. Robert Gillis, are from Codroy Valley, Newfoundland. Miss Lundrigan is a daughter of the late Peter and Elizabeth Lundrigan of St. John’s East. She is a former Social Director of the Newfoundland Club Inc. of Brooklyn. — Newfoundland Times.

Mrs. William McCarthy, of 424 56th. St., Brooklyn, is a native of St. John’s Newfoundland, but has been resident in Brooklyn for some 45 years. Mrs. McCarthy is the proud mother of eight children, including three married daughters, one of whom is a well known and distinguished stage dancer, appearing under the professional name of Miss Jane Moore. Miss Moore has appeared before the King and Queen in London at a Royal Command Performance, and taken part in other celebrity programs. Her engagements have taken her to many parts of the world, and she is now appearing in Boston. — Newfoundland Times."


November 18, 1941 CASUALTY REPORT "EVANS, Clarence, Seaman JX277366, R.N. missing presumed drowned. Next of kin, father, Mr, Charles T. Evans, Hant’s Harbor, T.B., Newfoundland.

YOUNG, Arthur, Gunner, No. 970925, R.A., injured in motor accident but condition gives no cause for anxiety. Next of kin, Mother, Mrs. Frederick Young, Corner Brook, Newfoundland."

November 18, 1941 YOUNG AIRMEN HOME ON LEAVE Three Newfoundlanders who received their wings on October 11th. last, at Rivers, Manitoba, returned by the express yesterday on ten days leave, before returning to Canada, preparatory to going overseas. They were Pilot Observer Brendan Hally, son of Mr. George H. and the late Mrs. Halley, Pilot Observer Monroe Baird, son of Mrs. and the late David M. Baird, and Pilot Observer Alexander Hamlyn.
November 18, 1941 WEDDING BELLS "ESCH — TILLEY: A very pretty weeding took place last night at St. Thomas’s Church at 8.30, when Phyllis Jean, daughter of Mrs. Mildred and the late Richard Tilley, was united in marriage with Corporal Ronald Carlton Esch, of the United States Base Command, son of Mr. and Mrs. Herman B. Esch of Strawberry Point, Iowa. Rev J.T. Rhodes, B.A. officiating.

The bride, who was given in marriage by her cousin, Mr. Walter S. Sparkes, wore a gown of powder blue chiffon over taffeta, cut on princess lines, with matching “sweetheart hat"" and carried a bouquet of roses, angel’s breath and maidenhair fern. The bridesmaid, Miss Florence Barter, wore a frock of shell pink chiffon over taffeta, with matching accessories, and carried a bouquet of pink and white chrystanemums and maiden hair fern. Sergeant Rolland Esch, brother of the groom, was best man. The bride’s mother wore a dress of wine chiffon velvet with matching accessories and a corsage of roses and maidenhair fern. Mr. H.W. Sterling, organist of the Church, played Mendelssohn’s wedding march as the bride and groom came down the aisle of the Church.

At the conclusion of the ceremony, a reception was held at the Crosbie Hotel, when the toast to the bride and groom was proposed by Rev. J.T. Rhodes and responded to by the groom, who proposed the toast to the bridesmaid, which was replied to by the best man.

FRASER — KNIGHT: The marriage took place at St. Matthew’s Church, Bay Roberts, on November 15th, of Margaret, daughter of Mr. D.G. and the late Mrs. Fraser, Bay Roberts, to Reginald, son of Mrs. and the late Mr. Herbert Knight, St. John’s. The ceremony was performed by Rev, Canon A.B.S. Stirling assisted by Rev. H. Torraville.

The bride looked very lovely in a gown of white satin with inserts of chantilly lace, the long tulle veil was held in place by a coronet of orange Blossoms. She carried a bouquet of red and cream roses, and was attended by her sisters, the Misses Mary and Edythe Fraser, who wore gowns of gold and green saille silk, and small flower hats to match. Mr. Douglas Pinsent ably performed the duties of best man and the usher was Mr. Edward Knight, brother of the groom. Dr. Harry Smith of St. John’s presided at the organ.

Following the ceremony, a reception was held at the home of the bride’s father. The bride’s going away costume was of Regent blue boucle with trimming of lynx fur.

After a brief honeymoon, Mr. and Mrs. Knight will reside at Circular Road, St. John’s.

CROKE — GLAVINE: FORTUNE HARBOR, Nov. 14th. A very pretty wedding was solemnized in St. Ann’s Church, Fortune Harbor, on Wednesday, November 12th., when Margaret, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. David Glavine, was united in the Holy Bonds of Matrimony, to John, son of Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Croke. The ceremony was performed by Rev. Father Hinchey, P.P.

The bride was attractively attired in Air Force Blue, wearing a corsage of small white roses, and carried a white prayer book. Miss Bride Croke attended the bride, she also wore blue and carried a white prayer book. Mr. Mike Glavine, brother of the bride, acted as best man. As the party entered the Church, which was beautifully decorated for the occasion, the bridal chorus from Lohengrin was played.

Immediately after the ceremony, a wedding feast was served at the home of the bride’s parents. Rev. Father Hinchey addressed the gathering, and proposed a toast to the bride, to which Mr. Mike Glavine suitably responded.

The couple were the recipients of many valuable gifts which gave evidence of the esteem in which the young couple are held in their community. We join in wishing the newly weds a very happy future. GUEST."

November 18, 1941 OBITUARY "MARTIN MOORE: On Friday October 18th., Martin Moore, one of our best known townsmen, passed away after a short illness. He was in his 71st year, and had a notable career during his early manhood.

The late Mr. Moore, son of the late John and Margaret Moore, of Avondale South, engaged in the fisheries at an early age, which he abandoned, when in the eighties, the earnings from that avocation were not sufficient to maintain those engaged in it. He went to the Crow’s Nest Pass with many other young Newfoundlanders, at the time of the “mining rush” where he worked for some years, then coming East, he entered the United States Merchant Marine, and followed the sea till the outbreak of the Boer War, when he “joined up” and served through that conflict. He was a member of the “Boer Fourth Cavalry” and fought at Spion Kop, Ladysmith, and other areas, where fierce resistance was put up by the Boers, during which he narrowly escaped death when his horse was shot and he was wounded while entangled in the stirrups, but extricated himself, and made his way unaided to camp. At Spion Kop, another horse was killed under him, and he barely escaped capture by spending the night under the shelter of shrubs on the veldt.

Returning to Canada, he enlisted with the Northwest Mounted forces, in company with the late Sergeant Joseph Squires of Manuels, and later went to Idaho, where he engaged in silver-lead mining for several years. Returning to his home, he engaged in farming, and for some years was Customs Collector at Avondale.

His passing was regretted by his many friends and relatives, particularly by the few remaining men of his day. His reminiscence of the Boer War campaign were intelligent and exceedingly entertaining, and many of his experiences would supply the basis for a “Boer War Epic”.

His wife, two sisters, and two brothers survive him. Tom, General Merchant, Avondale, and John now serving with the Canadian Fusilers. To them the sympathy and condolence of this community go out in their bereavement."

November 18, 1941 BIRTHS MacKINNON — On November 17th, at St. Clare’s Mercy Hospital, to Kay, wife of R.J. MacKinnon, a son.
November 18, 1941 MARRIAGES ESCH — TILLEY: On Monday November 17th, at St. Thomas’s Church, by the Rev. J.T. Rhodes. B.B., Phyllis Jean, daughter of Mrs. Mildred and the late Richard Tilley of St. John’s, to Corporal Ronald Carlton Esch, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Herman B. Esch, of Strawberry Point, Iowa.
November 18, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "A man who was charged with being drunk and disorderly in his boarding house, was fined $10.00 or 14 days, at the Magistrate’s Court yesterday. He was also ordered to sign bonds for his future good behaviour.

The Trade Review, dealing with local prices last week, states that “Cheese is up two cents; beans advanced twenty-five cents; oatmeal and rolled oats were average seventy-five cents a sack higher; feed oats are up twenty cents, and bran ten cents. Onions have nearly doubled in price, and apples in boxes and barrels are slightly firmer.

A meeting of the Newfoundland Dairymen’s Association will be held in the Brookfield School tonight at 8.30, to hear an address, and to consider a report of the committee on the milk supply. On Friday night, a meeting of all licenced dairymen who are interested in the present increasing demand for raw milk, will be held at the same time.

The express going out this evening, will leave in two sections, all first and second class passengers will leave at 6 p.m. and all sleeping car passengers at 6.20.

A truck driver was before the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, for operating a truck without a tail light and number plate. He was fined $5.00.

Fourteen motorist were before Court yesterday, charged with breaches of the traffic regulations. Fines of $1.00 were imposed. One charge for speeding was dismissed.

The regular monthly meeting of the Newfoundland Graduate Nurses Association will be held in the Child Welfare Rooms, Queen’s Road tonight. An address will be given by Dr. J. St. P. Knight."


November 19, 1941 DEATHS "BIGGS — Passed peacefully away after a brief illness, Josiah T. Biggs, aged 80 years, leaving to mourn their sad loss, wife, 2 sons, John and Joseph, of this city, 2 daughters, Mrs. C. Truscott, of this city, and Mrs. W.S. Earle, of Halifax, N.S. Funeral Thursday at 2.30 p.m., from his late residence, 58 Field Street.

DODD — Passed away Nov. 19th., Eileen Theresa, aged 12 years, darling child of Mary and William Dodd, leaving to mourn, father and mother, two sisters and four brothers, one of whom is serving overseas in the Royal Artillery. Funeral takes place Friday at 2.30 p.m., from her late residence, 58 Livingstone Street. R.I.P."

November 19, 1941 MARRIAGES OTTESON – MOORE: At the Oratory of the Presentation Convent, on November 17th, by Rev. R. McD Murphy, Margaret, daughter of Mr. and Mrs, Laurence Moore, of this city, to William Otteson, of Dalton, Minnesota, U.S.A.
November 19, 1941 OBITUARY "PHILIP HEALEY: AVONDALE, Nov. 10 – A long life time of eighty-five years, blessed with continuous health and highly energetic activity, was the good fortune in life of Mr. Philip Healey, and was interrupted only on Friday, October 31st., when his soul entered the heaven of eternity whence there is no return. Mr. Healey’s whole endeavour in life from an early age, was connected with the Shore and Labrador fisheries throughout the summer seasons, with a trip to the ice in the Spring.

Having pursued these industries unremittingly, from an early age till he attained nigh the three score and ten milestone, they held an all absorbing interest for him during the balance of his long lifetime. To such an extent was this the case, that he never tired of debating the pros and cons of our island fisheries, and telling of the numerous voyages he made to and from the “Westward” and Northern Labrador, with the many thrilling incidents and adventures inscribed in his memory, and that formed as it were, a log of his seafaring life. His parents, it appears, died when the family was young, and the lamented subject of our notice was adopted in the family of the late John Kennedy of Harbor Main, with whom his experience in fishery operations round Peter’s River and St. Mary’s Bay, or what was known generally in the latter half of the last century as the “Western Trip”, was acquired.

From Harbor Main as a young man, he moved to Avondale, and purchased the property and land of late Daniel Flynn, and established his home and family. His devotion to the sea for his livelihood never waned, and he continued the prosecution of the Labrador fishery as Master of the schooner, “Enchantress”, owned by the late Edward Kennedy. The late Mr. Healey was gifted to no mean degree, with health, memory, and fluency. He knew no illness during his long lifetime, and to the day of his sudden and unexpected passing, he cold recite with case and clearness, the most descriptive episode connected with his long and arduous lifetime, spent almost wholly at sea.

The surviving members of his family comprise four sons and two daughters. Of the former, John is a resident of Sydney, Cape Breton; Francis and Patrick live in New York, and Philip in Boston. One daughter Elizabeth, lived with her late father, and is now occupant of the home with only the “vacant chair” to remind her of her long years of attachment and fidelity, to him who so long occupied it. The second daughter, Mrs. Richard Whelan, is also a resident of Boston, Mass., and an only brother Patrick, an octogenarian, is still strong and active in the Parish of Holyrood.

After the celebration of a Solemn Mass of Requiem by Fr. Kavanagh, and the ministration of other funeral rites, our aged and worthy citizen was reverently placed by Undertaker Dunphy of Holyrood, beside other deceased members, to await with them, the triumphal hour of resurrection. REMEMBRANCE."

November 19, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "News has been received in the passing of Mrs. Du Bourdieu of Port au Port, whose death occurred suddenly, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. J.L. Joy of Port au Port. The late Mrs. Du Bourdieu, who had reached the advance age of eighty-six, was the widow of Mr. A.S. Du Bourdieu, for may years Customs Collector at Port au Port. — Humber Hearld.

The Newfoundland times states that Mrs. Theresa Duggan of Hudson, Mass., and formerly of Fermeuse, Newfoundland, passed away at the Clinton Hospital recently. Her husband is the son of the late James Duggan of Fermeuse, whilst the deceased lady was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Coady of Maynard, Mass., formerly of Renews.

A grand variety entertainment under the auspices of St. Mary’s Girl’s Club, will be held at St. Mary’s Hall tonight at 8.15. The program will feature Mrs. H A. Messcar, A.C.C.M., Concert Soprano. Other artistes will include Miss Marjorie Dalton, Spencer Choir, Messrs Hugh O’Neil, Stewart Godfrey, J Neville, Hector Wooley, and the Presbyterian Troupe, in a humorous sketch. "


November 20, 1941 WAR 25 YEARS AGO TODAY Nov. 20, 1916 — Bulgarian army defeated at Monstir retired on Prilep. Germans shelled British positions at Beaumont Hamel and Gueudecourt on the Somme. Rusians repulsed Turkish attacke on Sultanabad, Persia.
November 20, 1941 OBITUARY "MRS. LOUIS W. BONNELL: A shock came to us in St. John’s on Saturday last, November 15th., when a wire was received, announcing the passing after a brief illness, of “Eugene”, beloved wife of Louis W Bonnell, Electrician at the Power House of Messrs Bowater & Co. for the past 17 years, at Corner Brook.

Only very recently, the late Mrs. Bonnell returned home from an extensive visit in St. John’s, where she spent many pleasant and happy hours visiting her numerous friends, who extended to her a most hearty welcome, as she was of a genial and pleasant disposition — always an ardent Church worker, and the loss sustained by St. Mary’s Church, South Side, was Corner Brook's gain, where she continued her good work. “Jean” as she was familiarly called, was the daughter of the late John A. and Elizabeth Cook, South Side, St. John’s.

She leaves to mourn, a fond husband and one brother John W., who has been 27 years Supt. Steward of Messrs. Bowring Bros., and a large circle of friends.

The funeral took place on Tuesday the 18th., from her brother’s residence, 48 Springdale Street, St. John’s, by motor hearse. The service was conducted at the home by the Rev. Canon A.B.S. Stirling, also at the C. of E. Cemetery, where interment took place.

The Home Beyond — And ever we pray that tenderly thus, God may guide the souls that sail with us. That our beloved may also come To the Golden shore of the far-off Home. FRIEND"

November 20, 1941 BIRTHS GILLINGHAM — Born at St. Clair’s Mercy Hospital on November 19th, to Clara Marie, wife of Allan Gillingham, a son.
November 20, 1941 MARRIAGES "OTTESON – MOORE: At the Oratory of the Presentation Convent, on November 17th, by Rev. R. Med. Murphy, Margaret, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Laurence Moore of this city, to William Otteson, of Dalton, Minnesota, U.S.A.

MURRAY — SIMPSON: At Dovercourt, Essex, England, on November 19th, Susan Gay, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Simpson, to Edwin Neyle Murray, L/Bdr. 166th Newfoundland Field Regiment, Royal Artillery, son of the late Edwin and Mrs. Elizabeth Murray, Clydesdale, Forest Road."

November 20, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "Today, Thanksgiving Day, is a holiday in the United States, and is being observed by the American Contractors in St. John’s. Employees were informed yesterday, that this will be a free day. Many of the American families living here, have made arrangements to celebrate the day in customary manner.

A recent visitor to New York was Mr. Harold Loder, formerly of Hant’s Harbor, T.B., and son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Silas Loder. Mr. Loder left Newfoundland some 25 years ago, and during the greater part of that time, has been engaged in business in Western Canada. He is contemplating a visit in the near future. — Newfoundland Times

Shortly after last midnight, a bicycle, owned by one of the Postal Telegraphs Messengers, was stolen from in front of the Commercial Cable Co., Building, Water Street. Messengers of all the telegram services are having a lot of trouble in this respect, and many of them, who have had to go into buildings to deliver messages, returned to find their bicycles gone.

Twelve of the crew of a Britain Mercantile Navy vessel, which was recently in New York, were Newfoundlanders; they were Reg. Wheeler of Corner Brook; Herbert Stuckey, Herring Neck, Edgar Parrott and Fred Piercey, Winterton; Cluny Blandford and Sidney Burry, Greenspond; Fred Nolan, Mount Carmel; Carl Mouland, and Joseph West, Musgrave Harbor, Dan Jennings, Moreton’s Hr., Joseph Bennett, St. John’s, Walter Russell, Bonavista. They were guests at a dance and floor show held by the Newfoundland Club Inc. — Newfoundland Times. "


November 21, 1941 WEDDING BELLS "The Hollihan — Mallard Nuptials On Armistice Day.

“Slow buds the pink dawn like a rose from out night’s gray and cloudy sheath; Softly and still it grows and grows, petal by petal, leaf by leaf.”

The morning of Armistice day 1941, will be long remembered — at least by one happy couple in St. John’s, who on that occasion, were joined together in the Holy Bonds of Matrimony. At 9 a.m., in the beautiful Oratory of Our Lady of Mercy, Military Road, Nuptial Mass was celebrated by Rev. J. Murray, in the present of a large gathering of close relatives and intimate friends of the contracting parties, and then was solemnized the marriage of Miss Sadie Mallard, daughter of Mrs. Margaret and the late Patrick Mollard, formerly of Quidi Vidi, to Mr. Thomas Hollihan, well known resident of St. John’s East.

Mr. Edward Skiffington, prominent citizen and Night Watchman for many years, an uncle of the bride, acted as father giver, and the groom’s brother, Michael Holiham was best man. The bride looked most attractive as she came up the aisle, leaning on the arm of her uncle, to the strains of organ music. She wore a taffeta silk dress of Auqa Blue with head dress to match, and carried a bouquet of carnations and fern. The bridesmaid, Miss Helen Myler, niece of the bride, was quite a picture in a coral moire silk dress with head dress to match, and carried a pretty bouquet. The bride’s mother wore becoming black satin and lace.

After the wedding, there was a reception at Smithville, where breakfast was served. The usual toasts were honoured. Rev. J. Murray proposed the health to the bride and groom, to which the latter responed, and Rev. J. Cotter also honoured a toast. Capt. L.C. Murphy proposed the health of the parents, to which Mr. Edward Skiffington responded and the best man spoke for the bridemaids. The reception terminated at noon when the bride and groom left on a tour of the Avalon Peninsula, where the honeymoon was spent. They were given a kindly and enthusiastic send off by all the guests.

The bride was for some years the efficient Telephone Operator at the General Hospital, where her unfailing courtesy won her many friends. The groom is one of the best types of the city, and very future happiness is assured."

November 21, 1941 OBITUARY "MRS. ROBERT LEE: NORTH SYDNEY, Nov. 17. — A host of friends here and in Newfoundland, will learn with deep regret of the death at an early hour Saturday evening, of one of this town’s best known residents, Mrs. Robert Lee. Her death occurred at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Alonzo Brown, Peppett Street, after an illness of four weeks.

Born in Newfoundland 77 years ago, the deceased moved here many years ago, and during her residence here she earned the respect and esteem of a widespread circle of friends. She was a member of the St. John’s Anglican Church."

November 21, 1941 DEATHS "PEYTON — Passed peacefully away at the General Hospital on November 20th., after a long and painful illness, Eliza, widow of the late Richard Peyton, in her 82 nd., year. Leaving to mourn the loss of a loving mother, are four daughters, Mrs. T. Walsh, at Montreal, Mrs. Margaret Young, at St. John N.B., Mrs. Hugh Channing, New York, Mrs. S. Constantine of this city; also one sister, Mrs. Dinah Pearcy, Prince of Wales Street. Funeral take place at 2.30 p.m. tomorrow, Saturday, from her late residence, 19 Hamilton Street. “Asleep in Jesus, Blessed sleep.”"
November 21, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "During the past week, the bridge over the water course at Mundy Pond was taken up, and pipes were laid to take away the water from Ropewalk Range.

An R.C.N. Truck and motor car were in collision yesterday morning, at the junction of Hutching’s and Water Street. The rear left fender of the car was damaged. The truck skidded going over the incline.

A Canadian Naval Rating was before Magistrate’s Court yesterday, charged with being drunk and with stealing a bicycle, the property of the Postal Telegraph Department. He was taken to the East End Fire Hall early yesterday morning, by three American Soldiers, who found him on Signal Hill. He denied taking the bicycle, but pleaded guilty of being drunk. A fine of $5.00 was imposed.

The light snowfall which started yesterday morning and continued through the afternoon, covered the streets for a dept of three or four inches, and more in some places. It rendered inclines slippery and made it difficult for cars and trucks. The young folks were in their element, and yesterday afternoon, sleds were hurriedly taken from their hiding places and used to the enjoyment of all. It was raining last night, so that there will be little left today.

Thomas Michael Mullaly of Northern Bay, who was charged with manslaughter, and against whom the Grand Jury brought no bill, will appear before Magistrate Ash today, on a charge of taking a motor car without the consent of the owner. Sergeant Case will conduct the case for the Crown, and the accused will be represented by Mr. Cramm, K.C.

Commencing in May, and to date, the number of cords of bundled pulpwood reaching Corner Brook, from points West, has exceeded any previous season’s delivery by that method. The highest quantity on any previous occasion was that of 1940, when 38,000 cords were delivered by the Railway. The total for 1941 is now reaching 60,000 cords, with every chance of another three weeks of good wood handling weather, bringing the season’s figure to more than 70,000 cords. — Western Star.

Stephen Janes, Bella Ryall, and Rose O’Donel, who were found guilty of robbery with violence, will be sentenced at the Supreme Court today.

An American Sergeant who is located at Fort Pepperrell, was before Court yesterday, charged with speeding on LeMarchant Road. Evidence was that he was doing 40 m.p.h. He was fined $25.00.

Newfoundland Railway has announced that owing to the dock sheds being congested with inward cargo, consignees desiring to take delivery after hours, may do so by making arrangements with the Coastal Office."

November 21, 1941 ODDITIES "LOOKING AHEAD – Johannesburg – Figuring on “rehabilitation after the war” this South African mining city is planning new arterial roads, increased power supply, and sub-economic housing for Europeans and non-Europeans.

OCCUPY HOE MANSION — Plymouth – At the request of the British Admiralty, the Y.M.C.A. took over the famous Hoe Mansion Hotel in this Channel Port, for use as a Hostel for men of the Navy and Merchant Marine.

AIRMEN FROM CONGO — Pretoria – Large contingents of young Belgians have arrived from the Congo to train as pilots, observers, and mechanics in the South African Air Force.

INTER-EMPIRE TULIPS – Cape Town, in the course of Australian - South African trade, tulips bulbs are being imported from Australia - it’s the first time. They usually come from Holland.

NAAFI IN THE RED. - London, one year’s account of the British Navy, Army and Air Force Institutes — NAAFI for short – providing catering and entertainment, showed a loss of the equivalent of $1,862,000 because of Norway and France evacuations."


November 23, 1941 WEDDING BELLS "PROWSE — QUIGLEY: On Thursday, November 20th., the wedding of Mary, only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. M.F. Quigley, to Edward, second son of Mrs. and the late John Prowse, took place at the Oratory of the Sacred Heart, Convent of Our Lady of Mercy, Military Road, Reverend Father Vincent P. Quigley, brother of the bride, officiated at the Ceremony and at the Nuptial Mass which followed it. Mr. John Quigley, also a brother of the bride, was acolyte.

The bride, who was given in marriage by her father, looked very charming in a gown of aqua blue moire taffeta, with bouffant skirt and fitted bodice. Her hat of matching taffeta, was trimmed with small autumn flowers, and her bouquet was of yellow-gold chrysanthemum and fern. She was attended by her cousin, Miss Brenda Kelly, whose gown of London tan taffeta was cut on similar lines, with matching hat, and who also carried a bouquet of chrysanthemums. The bride’s mother was attired in black chiffon velvet, with black picture hat and suitable accessories. The mother of the of the groom wore black satin, with silver jeweled clips. The duties of best man were ably performed by Mr. Augustine Prowse, brother of the groom.

During the ceremony, Miss Mary Keough presided at the organ, and rendered the Bridal Chorus and Wedding March in a very artistic manner. Miss Keough also accompanied the Offertory Solo Rosewig’s “Ave Maria”, sung by Mr. Herman Quigley, brother of the bride, whose rich tenor voice filled the Oratory with strains which were devotional and inspiring.

After the wedding, which was attended only by the immediate relatives and friends of both families, the bridal party motored to Donovan’s, Topsail Road, for breakfast, during which the usual toasts were duly honoured. The health of the newly-married pair was proposed by Mr. Charles Kelly, who in sincere and well chosen words, wished them on behalf of the assembled guests, a long and happy life together. He was followed by Rev Father Quigley with a brief scholarly address on the ideals of true Christian marriage, which was very beautiful and impressive, and in which he exhorted the young couple to pattern their lives on those ideals. The groom made a suitable response. The health of the bride’s parents was proposed by Mr. Urban Kelly, and responded to by Mr. Michael F. Quigley, who in turn proposed the health of the groom’s mother. Mr. Augustine Prowse then proposed the health of the bridesmaid. The toast to ‘Absent Friends” was proposed by the groom, who spoke of the many friends, and relatives who were unable to be present, and regretted the absence of three of his brothers, now serving with His Majesty’s Forces Overseas. He included in the toast, his and his bride’s friends and co-workers at Argentia, where the young couple are both employed in the U.S. Navy Department. The wedding breakfast was concluded with a short musicale, in which all the company participated.

The happy couple then left by car for Woodstock, Topsail, where a brief honeymoon will be spent, after which they will resume their duties at Argentia. The bride’s travelling costume consisted of a London tan crepe dress, tweed coat with silver fox collar, and matching accessories. The groom’s present to the bride was a gold wristwatch, to the bridesmaid, a birthstone ring, and to the best man, a handsome leather wallet. The valuable and useful gifts received by the young couple were many and well chosen. These included a substantial cheque from their co-workers of the Navy Department, Argentia.

All their friends join in wishing Mr. and Mrs. Prowse success and happiness in the future, which for them is just beginning."

November 23, 1941 OBITUARIES "EILEEN DODD: Leaves have their time to fall, and flowers to wither at the North Wind’s breath, but thou hast all season for thine own O Death!

Once again the truth of these words is verified, for on Wednesday, November 19th., the Angel of Death visited the home of Mr. and Mrs. William Dodd, 63 Livingstone Street, and summoned to its eternal reward the pure soul of their darling child Eileen.

She was a promising pupil of the Presentation Convent School, Cathedral Square. Her sweet and gentle ways, the faithful performance of her allotted tasks, her cheerful, helpful disposition, won for her the esteem and love of teachers and companions alike.

The funeral took place yesterday, the Feast of the Presentation of Our Lady, when all that was mortal of dear Eileen was consigned to Mother Earth. May her soul rest in peace.

To her sorrowing parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Dodd, to her brother, William, serving in the 57th Regt. Royal Artillery, Leo, Gerald, and Douglas, at home, and to her sisters, Mary and Elsie, we extend sincere sympathy.

TIMOTHY BUTLER: AVONDALE, Nov. 19 — On Thursday, November 6th., an aged and highly respected resident of Avondale, in the person of Mr. Timothy Butler, gained admission through the portals of death, to than peaceful abode in eternity, which his lifetime practice of the best Christian principles in religion and otherwise, secured for him.

He was born in Avondale, Sept 30th 1867, and during his good average lifetime of seventy-four years, he put forth in various industrial connections, a marked application of continuous energy and diligence, that enabled him to provide for himself and his loved ones, a satisfactory measure of life’s comforts, and the coveted privilege of independence in his declining years.

Like very many of his contemporaries, the late Mr. Butler gave his attention in his early years to the Bank and Labrador fisheries, but his reward in these pursuits did not appease his ambition for the success and advancement he desired, hence it was that he sought successfully, an engagement with the Reid Nfld. Co. in road construction and repair work, which he afterwards continued for nigh forty years. During that long period of service, he filled with great efficiency, the post of Section Foreman at Gambo for thirteen years, at Ferryland for eighteen years, and Construction Foreman on several branch lines, for eight or nine years, in the beginning of his career in operations with the railway.

With the closing of the Trepassey Branch in 1931, our lamented subject was worthily places on the pension list of the Nfld. Railway, and he returned to his former home town of Avondale, where he built a new and comfortable dwelling house, and settled down to enjoy his evening of life, on the merits and rewards of a lifetime of honest and faithful service.

About two years ago, his health showed signs of failing, and during eight months prior to his death, he was confined to his bed, where he received frequent visits from Rev. Fr. Kavanagh, and all the consolation which the ministration of the rites of his Church provided him with.

His surviving relatives are Mrs. Butler, nee Miss Catherine Kelly, formerly of Gambo, and one daughter Mrs. Michael Cashin, whose assistance and comfort to her parents during the long illness of her father, rendered gentle and easy the sorrows and grief of the daily approach of their disunion through death. They are recipients of sincere sympathy from a large circle of friends.

After the celebration of a Solemn Requiem Mass for his soul’s eternal welfare, the remains of one of nature’s public men, in the person of Timothy Butler, were carefully and reverently placed by undertaker Dunphy of Holyrood, in their final place of rest, to await, with all good, the joyous sounds of the trumpet call. Remembrance."

November 23, 1941 DEATHS FRANKLIN — Passed peacefully away at Nairobi Kenya, East Africa, Colonel Will H. Franklin, D.S.O. Born at Liverpool, England.
November 23, 1941 NOTE OF THANKS Mrs. A.M. Bishop of Burnt Head, Cupids, wishes to thank all kind friends who sent cards, messages and wreaths, and all those who in any away helped during the recent illness and death of her beloved husband, Noah Bishop.
November 23, 1941 IN MEMORIAM In loving memory of my dear daughter, Mary Furlong - King, who died November 22nd., 1936. We miss her now she is dead and gone. As time goes by we miss her more, Her loving thoughts her gentle face, There is no one else can take her place. Inserted by her mother, father, sister, and brothers. R.I.P.
November 23, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "The Western Star states that a few cases of scarlet fever have been reported in the community during the past week. Both Corner Brook General Hospital and the Humber Clinic, are prepared for inoculation against this disease.

A Sailor who was charged with being drunk and with breaking a pane of glass in a house on Waldegrade St., was before Court yesterday. He was fined $5.00 for being drunk and $1.00 compensation for the glass.

During the past two weeks, a number of loggers have joined Bowater’s camps for the winter cut. Some of them have given up construction work, where they were exposed to the weather more than they will be in the woods. About 2,000 are now employed at the camps, and another 500 could be given employment. - Western Star.

Two residents of Stephen Street were before Court yesterday in an assault case. It appears they live in the same house with kitchens adjoining. The plaintiff claimed that the defendant hurled him through the shutter opening between the kitchens, and tore his shirt and overalls, besides cutting his arm. The defendant was remanded on bail in the sum of $200.00.

The twenty-five horses housed at the Sanitary Department, last week, consumed 3500 lbs hay, 25 sacks oats, 3 sacks brand. Keep for the week cost the council $172.35."


November 25, 1941 BIRTHS STIRLING — At the Grace Hospital Wednesday, Nov. 12, to Margaret, wife of Sergt. Instructor Frank H. Sterling, R.C.A.F., a son.
November 25, 1941 AT HOME Mrs. W.H. Crane will be “At Home” at her residence, 338 Duckworth Street, on Wednesday.
November 25, 1941 NOTE OF THANKS Mrs. Clara Dawe and family of Cupids, wish to thank their many friends for their kind messages, letters, and cards of sympathy, in the loss of their husband and father, the late George W. Dawe, and to all those who in any way helped to lighten the burden in their sad bereavement.
November 25, 1941 WEDDING BELLS "WADE – TRAHEY: AVONDALE, Nov . 18. — The event of most interest at Conception Harbor for so long time past, was the marriage on Tuesday, November 11th., of Marie, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Timothy Trahey, to Patrick, son of the late Captain James and Mrs. Wade.

The young contracting parties are residents of Conception Hr. and enjoy a good measure of popularity in the social life of our community. The bride too, has spent some considerable time in the United States, where the influence of an excellent occupation, and other spheres of association, left nothing to be desired on her part, in the acquisition of all that is necessary, for her new and future role of life in Conception Hr.

Precisely at 4 o’clock, the wedding party entered the Church, and soon the good offices of Rev. Fr. Scully, P.P., pronounced the sacred nuptials. The bride was neat and handsome in appearance, her wedding attire being composed of pale blue silk with hat and flowers of a corresponding shade. Miss Catherine Dalton, in dress opf the neatest style and shade, filled the duty of attendant to the bride, and Mr. James Wade, nephew of the groom, performed the duty of best man.

Return to the beautiful home of the groom was made immediately after the ceremony at the Church, and a sumptuous repast indulged in by a large number of friends of the bride and groom, with which, amidst a good measure of jollity and mirth, all present made an acquaintance of the utmost pleasure and satisfaction.

In the early hours of the morning the members of the wedding party, each with copious expressions of goodwill and felicitations for the bride and groom, disbanded, and we too, sincerely wish Mr. and Mrs. Wade a happy and joyous passage, fanned ever by gentle zephyrs, across the matrimonial sea of life on which they have embarked. A FRIEND."

November 25, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "The Humber Herald states “Mr. James G. Blake of Richmond, Virginia, arrived here on Friday, last week, to fill the post of Editor of the Western Star, in succession to A.L. Barrett of Curling, who recently resigned. Mr. Blake was accompanied by his son James G. Blake Jr.”

Three sailors who were arrested on Saturday night, near the Post Office, were charged with being drunk and disorderly and assaulting the Police. They were released on bonds in the sum of $100.00, to appear later.

The Proprietress of a small shop in Gorman’s Lane, was before the Magistrate’s Court on Saturday, charged with selling liquor and with being in possession of a bottle on which there was a defaced label. She was fined $200.00.

Mr. David Sheehan, Brooklyn, formerly of Cappahayden, recently suffered a fractured elbow and a head injury, which required six stitches to close, while working at the Bridge Freezing and Cold Storage Co., 109 Cliff St., N.Y.C. He was treated in Beekam St. Hospital and is now recuperating at his home. — Nfld Times.

The Newfoundland Times states that Mrs. Kenny of Brooklyn, formerly of Fermeuse, recently telephoned her sister Mrs. Aspell, in Montreal. This was their first conversation in sixteen years. Mrs. Aspell is eighty-one years of age.

Under The auspices of the Atlantic Lodge I.O.O.F., a high tea and concert will be held at Victoria Hall tomorrow night. Teas will be served at six o’clock and the concert will begin at eight o’clock. Mr. J.B. McEvoy will preside."


November 26, 1941 LATE WILLIAM WHITE LAID TO REST The funeral of the late William White took place yesterday afternoon from his late residence, LeMarchant Road. At the home, a brief service was held with Revs. Dr. D.K. Burns and S.G. Garland, M.A., B.D., officiating. The hymns used were; “The Lord My Sheppherd“ and “Peace perfect peace”. In the funeral procession were a guard of honour from St. John’s Masonic Lodge. The employees of the White clothing Company, of which deceased was the Managing Director, and a large number of citizens of all classes and creeds. Burial was at the General Protestant Cemetery, where the commital rites were also taken by Revs. Dr. Burns and Mr. Garland.
November 26, 1941 EX-SOLDIER DIES ON ARMISTICE DAY "Word has been received of the passing of another Veteran of the last Great War — this time it is a very well known member of the Royal Newfoundland Regiment, No. 1179, James Squires, who embarked for overseas with “E” Company in April 1915, and was transferred to the 1st Battalion at Stob's Camp, later going on service with the Mediterranean Expeditionary Forces and in France.

“Jim” was a son of Mr. Richard Squires of College Square, in the East End. Another brother, Jack, went over with the “Blue Puttees” and a third brother paid the price of Admiralty, going sown with his ship in the Royal Navy. A stepbrother, David, is now “Somewhere in England” with the Royal Artillery.

Deceased was cheerful and popular. He was lively and active. Liked by his Comrades, the life of a canteen concert at Hazeley Down, fond of horses and proud of his duties as a groom. His death will come as quite a shock to the old associates of “Ours” who have survived the great conflict.

Jim was found dead in his room at Bermuda on the afternoon of Armistice Day. Apparently he passed away around twelve o’clock as he had been at work in the morning and seemed in good health. His funeral took place on the following day, and was attended by nearly all the Newfoundlanders who were working on the island. A gracious gesture was that of Mr. E.J. Ring, who ordered a wreath on behalf of the G.W.V.A., and this was placed on the coffin by Ex-Private Joseph White, who had been overseas with the deceased. They had both been in the same tent at Sob's, and in the same Company during training at Scotland.

The passing of this former Veteran of “Ours” seems to have been sudden, still some of his co-workers say that the week previous, he had been looking ill, although on the job all the time.

And so, in the Great Silence which falls upon the British Empire on this memorable November 11th, another gallant comrade fell asleep; “Jim” has passed to join the Silent Battalions, and across the Great Divide, we hope many, very many, of those who wore the claret and white so proudly, and to whom the Caribou represented courage and loyalty, were there to greet him.

“In each man lies something he would not exchange, Memories he’ll treasure until life’s end” — L.C.M."

November 26, 1941 FIRST U.S. TROOPS MOVE INTO BARRACKS "Expected All Will Be At Fort Pepperell by 15th December — Erections at Camp Alexander May Be used for Housing Workmen

The first Company of the United States Troops stationed in St. John’s, moved on Monday from Camp Alexander, to the new barracks at Fort Pepperell, and further companies will move in day by day. It was anticipated that the troops would be in permanent barracks by the 15th of the present month, but difficulties in securing heating apparatus made the delay.

Some six or seven months ago, Camp Alexander was created as a summer camp, with single board floors and without wall insulation of course. There are a large number of men, employed at Fort Pepperell and other construction for defence, whose homes are within motoring distance of the city, and who board and lodge here, but return to their homes for the weekend. The United States authorities have now under consideration, utilizing the erections at Camp Alexander, when vacated by the troops, to house and feed the workmen from nearby settlements, if some 500 men express their approval of the proposition. If the plan materialises, the floors in the erections at the camp will be covered with building paper and have a second floor installed, for purpose of providing comfort for the men.

The United States authorities have secured a site for a recreation building on land to the North of the Central Fire Hall, and fronting on Allandale Road. This land has been secured from the Government on short lease. The erection of the building has commenced and is expected to be completed within four weeks.

The new building will contain dormitories, a theatre to seat about 1000, reading rooms, etc., and a large number of bowling alleys. It will be used by members of the troops stationed in St. John’s, and by members of the United States Air Force, Navy, and Merchant Marine. A first Aid building erected at Fort Peperell was hauled to the site yesterday afternoon."


November 27, 1941 SEAMEN PATIENTS AT THE HOSPITALS "At the Grace Hospital: Captain John Mackenzie would appreciate a visit from natives of Stornonway, Scotland, who are in transit in this City. Survivor Jenkins has now spent six months at this Hospital. Mr. Francis Murray, aged 25 years, now at the Grace, lost his father at sea, and when his home at Govan Road, Glasgow, was bombed, his mother, wife, and 18 month-old baby, were killed.

At St. Clare’s Mercy Hospital: Survivor Tilbury, now six months at this Hospital, is progressing favourably.

At Lester’s Field Hospital: John Hasting of Saltcoats, Scotland, and Robert Adamson, Glasgow, are under the Doctor's care. GAIDHEAL."

November 27, 1941 IN MEMORIAM "JOSIAH BIGGS: ""Life is a short, short dream, as we look toward its trend. We toil, we plan and scheme, then close our eyes. It is the end.""

On Tuesday, November 18th., as the chimes of the old clock struck eight, all that spark of life left one of our dear friends in the person of Josiah Biggs, (Cooper) in his 80th year.

“Son,” as he was known to most of his old comrades in his early days, was a man of robust nature; he started life at sea, sailing from St. John’s to New York on a freighting schooner, the “Miranada”. When that boat was lost, he decided to stay on land and seek a livelihood. Joining the first Volunteer Fire Brigade in the city, he served his apprenticeship as a Cooper and was one of its organizers, continuing to be a life long member up to his death, being, fifty years on the roll.

Truly a man who worked with men and stood by his words, as the slogan of the Coopers’ Union is, “United we stand, divided we fall”, keeping on his feet until August, and always looking for the bright side of the trade.

To his sorrowing wife who for over fifty years was his partner, his son Joseph of the Standard Manufacturing Co., and John of Harvey & Co., his daughters, Mrs. W.S. Earle of Halifax, Nova Scotia, Mrs. C. Truscott of this city, the writer joins in extending deepest sympathy. W. Brien."

November 27, 1941 A TRIBUTE TO WILLIAM WHITE """All in the dark November the sad winds seem to sigh. Remember, oh remember the friends who once were nigh.""

November, month of remembrance, and as we sit with memories of dear departed ones, our grief is added to, because of a death in our midst of a worthy son of his native land. One who had laboured long and untiringly in efforts towards the welfare of Nfld. and its people. All this and more, can truly be said of William White, whose passing, because of the part he played in life, is regretted throughout the island.

He laboured day after day, week after week, and year after year, even almost to the moment he was summoned into eternity, in an attempt to promote the welfare of his less fortunate fellow man. During recent years, he gave much of his service in the interest of the unemployed, and if those kindly lips now settled in death, which had so fearlessly and so intelligently spoken in the interest of his fellow men, could speak again, they would still mutter words of encouragement to a people who had loved him because of his make up.

He was ever willing to share his vast knowledge with others. Truly, our country can ill afford to lose such a type of man who felt no hour too long in his zeal for work, that would be for the welfare of the land he had loved so dearly. Rest on kind friend, may the sod of your native land rest lightly on your bosom, and may the sorrowing relatives be consoled with the thought that he has left with all he came in contact, an impression that even the passing of time cannot dim. H.F."

November 27, 1941 DEATHS "SQUIRES — Passed away suddenly at Bermuda, on Nov. 11th, 1941, James Squires in his 49th year, the son of Richard Squires and the late Elizabeth Graham. He leaves to mourn, father, and brother Jack of H.M. Customs. (Boston papers please copy.)

STREET — Passed away suddenly at her residence, 52 Livingstone St., Susannah, beloved wife of William Street, leaving to mourn, husband, three sons, and three daughters. Funeral notice later.

PARSONS — Passed peacefully away on Sunday November 223rd., at his home, Water Street West, Hr. Grace, John Parsons in his 66th year. Left to mourn are two sons, Chesley serving overseas with the Royal Navy, Gordon at home, one daughter, Mrs. Gilbert Winsor, residing in Boston, Mass., also three sisters, Mrs. R. Andrews, Gertrude and Ida.

BUTLER — Passed peacefully away on Nov. 20th., at 6.45 o’clock, Charles Butler, age 50 years, leaving to mourn wife, one daughter, four sons and two sisters, one at Boston. Funeral on Friday at 2.30 o’clock from his late residence, 17 Young St. - Boston and New York papers please copy.

OKE — Yesterday afternoon at General Hospital, Margaret M., daughter of Robert and the late Norah Oke. Funeral on Friday at 2.30 p.m. by motor hearse, from the residence of her aunt, Mrs. Edward Power, 240 Duckworth Street."

November 27, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "For some time past, representatives of the Anglo-Newfoundland Development Co. Ltd., and the various trade unions in Grand Falls, have been negotiating, with relation to a cost of living bonus to be granted to employees. The result of the negotiations between the A.N.D. Co. Ltd., and the unions, is now announced, and the Company has issued a cost of living bonus to all employees. This bonus is announced as $1.00 per week. — Grand Falls Advertiser.

The Newfoundland Times states that Mr. Thomas Christopher will become a U.S. Citizen in the near future. “Tommy” served as a Sergeant in the Royal Newfoundland Regiment, and was a Blue Puttee Veteran.

A number of “Stop” signs and “No Traffic” signs were torn from their places on Water Street during the early hours of yesterday morning. They were picked up by the Police.

Miss Marie Neil of Spaniard’s Bay, received a message last Saturday from her brother Edward F. Neil, who is serving on H.M.S. Aircraft carrier “Ark Royal”, stating that he was safe and well. — Bay Roberts Guardian."


November 29, 1941 MARRIAGES MORRISSEY — BRYNLDSEN: At St. Patrick’s Church at 11 a.m., Nov. 26th., by Rt. Rev. Mons. Flynn, P.P., Dorothy Mary, daughter of Bertram and the late Ellen Francis Brynldsen of St. John’s, to Samuel Edward, son of Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Morrissey of Carbonear.
November 29, 1941 DEATHS "MIDDLETON — Passed peacefully away on Nov. 27th., Bertram Middleton, at the age of 50 years. Funeral on Sunday at 2.30 p.m., from his late residence, 25 Cookstown Road, to the Church of England Cemetery.

SMITHWICK — At St. Bonaventure’s College early this morning, Rev Brother W.P. Smithwick, (Brother Philip) aged 83 years. Funeral notice later R.I.P.

BENSON — Passed peacefully away at his residence, 105 St. Clare Avenue, on November 28th., Benjamin J. Benson, aged 59 years; leaving to mourn, wife, three sons, three daughters, two stepsons, also a large circle of friends. Funeral on Sunday at Grates Cove.

KELLY — Passed peacefully away yesterday, at Middle Cove, after a long illness, Mary, wife of the late John Kelly, aged 76 years; leaving to mourn, four sons, two daughters, Patrick, Nicholas and Mary in U.S.A., Mrs. John Power, Flatrock, Thomas and John at home, also ten grandchildren, and one sister at broad Cove, and a large circle of friends. Funeral on Sunday. May her soul rest in peace.

ADEY — Entered peacefully into rest Nov. 28th., Rose Ann Reid, beloved wife of Reuben Adey; leaving to mourn besides husband, four daughters, Mrs. S.J. Stuckless, Mrs. M.J. Clarke, Ella and Carrie at home, also one son, John, and 12 grandchildren. Funeral will take place on Sunday at 2.30 p.m., from her late residence, 150 Merrymeeting Rd. (Boston and American papers please copy.)"


December 1, 1941 DEATHS "TAYLOR — Passed peacefully away on Saturday, Nov. 29th., at 10 o’clock, after a long illness, Alfreda, beloved wife of William Taylor; leaving to mourn, husband, three daughters and one son, one brother and one grand daughter. Funeral takes place today, Monday, Dec. 1st., at 2.30 p.m. from her late residence 44 Lime Street. “Until the day dawns.”

CLARKE — Passed peacefully away at 2.30 p.m., Saturday, Nov. 29th., Sarah Clarke, widow of the late Joseph Clarke; leaving three daughters, Mrs. George Lane, Mrs. Allan Benson, Mrs. Ern. Clouston, also one sister, Mrs. S. Caines, and one brother, William Cooper, to mourn their sad loss. Funeral today Monday at 2.30 p.m., from her daughter’s residence, 24 Balsam Street."

December 1, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "Three weeks’ income of a typical farmer was needed in 1940, to match the average automobile taxes paid per vehicle.

The death of Mr. Fred COLLIER, Painter, occurred suddenly on Saturday morning at his home, Victoria Street. His funeral was held yesterday afternoon.

An important meeting of the Newfoundland Dairymen’s Association will be held tonight at Brookfield School, to consider a further increased in the price of milk.

The Railway announced a special freight acceptance at the Railway Freight Shed today, Monday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. for the following points; Cook’s Hr., Raleigh, Ship Cove, Quirpon, Griquet. This is for forwarding via Humbermouth.

The temporary building adjoining the Court House on Water Street for the Supplies Division of the Public Works Department, is nearing completion. It certainly does not improve the surroundings nor the architecture of Water Street.

Cars that were on the streets yesterday without chains, had difficulty in getting around. From the way some of them acted on inclines and on turns, it appeared to be dangerous to pedestrians and other vehicles, to have them out without the equipment necessary for the kind of conditions that prevailed.

Five truck drivers were before Court on Saturday charged with driving without tail lights on their vehicles. Fines of from one to two dollars, were imposed.

It is expected that the transfer of the United States Forces from Camp Alexander to Fort Pepperell, will be completed today and tomorrow. The Hospital staff at North Bank have also been moved to the Fort.

Announcement has been made that in order ensure satisfactory operation, the Air Raid Sirens will be tested regularly on every Thursday morning at 10 o’clock. It is possible that tests will also be made following snow storms and heavy gales.

Most of the marshes and some of the smaller ponds, were frozen solid in the past few days, and on Saturday and yesterday, large numbers of young people visited them and enjoyed skating and hockey. The light snow yesterday, was swept off by the anxious sports lovers.

A Canadian Soldier who was before the Magistrate’s Court on Saturday, charged with being drunk and disorderly and with breaking a pane of glass in the store of Messrs. Gray and Goodland, was fined $14.00 or 14 days imprisonment on the first charge, and ordered to pay $40.00 compensation or to serve one month, for breaking the glass.

At the Magistrate’s Court on Saturday afternoon, a young man appeared before Magistrate O’Neill and was charged with stealing three motor cars. He was remanded. The accused appeared last week for stealing a car and was remanded on bail. It is alleged that since that, he stole another car. Constable Sheppard of Heart’s Content arrested the accused at that place on Saturday morning, in a car that is supposed to have been stolen from St. John’s, though at the time it had one number plate, which belonged to a car owned in another town."


December 2, 1941 BIRTHS GRANT — Born Nov. 28th., at Bell Island, to Mr. and Mrs. Arthur J. Grand, a daughter.
December 2, 1941 MARRIAGE BURT — MILLEY: At the United Church Manse, Breadalbaane, P.E.I., on Nov. 1st, 1941, by Rev. Edward Milley, Miss Edith A Milley, to H.N. Burt.
December 2, 1941 NOTE OF THANKS "The family of the late Anne Joseph Cowley, wishes to thank all those who in any way sympathized with them during the illness and death of a loving wife and mother; especially Rev. J.J. Murray, Rev. J.S. Kavanagh, Avondale C.B; Dr Donahue.

For Mass Cards: — The White family, Mr. and Mrs. E.P. Fitzgerald, Miss Mary Beehan, Fitzgerald family, Mr. and Mrs. George Conway, pupils Grade VIII at Patrick’s Hall School, Mrs. Alice Dunn, Miss M. Cooper, Fred W. Harris, Mr. and Mrs. and Linus Constantine, Michael Kelly and family, James Bennett and family, Miss Cecily Condon (3), Mr. and Mrs. John Ryan, Mr. J. James, Kevin James, Cantwell Family, Mr. E.F. Beeham, Mr. and Mrs. T. Conway and family, Mr. and Mrs. J.L. Burke, Bay Roberts; Mrs. P.J. Beeham, Cupids; Mrs. John Delahunty, New York, U.S.A.

For Wreaths: — Employees Royal Stores Ltd., Employees East End Stores, Const., and Mrs. Parsons, Mr. and Mrs. Alec Haye, Stevenson family, Mrs. A. Grimes, Mr and Mrs Harold Andrews, Port de Grave.

For Cards of Sympathy: — Mr. Bert Wells, Mrs. Maisie Marshall, Mr. and Mrs. G. Ralph, Miss Winnie Garland, John Kavanagh, Nurse Goode, Mrs and Joan Kavanagh, Mr. and Mrs. A. Aiken, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Terry, Chapel’s Cove.

For telegrams of Sympathy: — Sr. M. Lucina, Brigus; Mrs. Ida Delaney and family, Bay Roberts: Mr. and Mrs Maurice Kennedy, Avondale; Mr. and Mrs. E Butler, Deer Lake; Richard Burke and family, Brigus.

For letters of Sympathy: — Sr. M Georgina, Arkansas, U.S.A. Mr. W.W. March, Mr. J. D. Burke, St. Mary’s; Nfld Protective Association of Shop and Office Employees.

They also would like to thank Mrs. (Const.) Parsons, Mrs. Fitzgerald, Mrs Bell, Miss Cooper, Mrs. Constantine, Mrs. J.H. Newell and Miss Edith Barnes, for their many acts of kindness during her illness."

December 2, 1941 OBSEQUIES LATE BROTHER PHILIP "The funeral of the late Rev. Brother Smithwich, (Brother Philip) who died at St. Bonaventure’s College on Saturday morning, took place yesterday morning. The deceased, who was 83 years of age, has been many years in the Country, and for some years past, has had to retire from active work.

Yesterday morning, Solemn High Mass of Requiem was solemnized in the Cathedral at 10.30, following which, the funeral to the Brothers Plot at Belvedere, took place. Pupils of the Christian Brothers Schools in the city attended Mass, as well as many ex-pupils of the college, and friends of the deceased."

December 2, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "Two truckmen were before the Court yesterday, charged with stealing chocolates to the value of $1.20, from the premises of Messrs, Harvey & Co. The complaint was laid by the Company’s Detective. They were fined $20.00 or one month.

Two Carpenters were before the Magiastrate’s Court yesterday, with being drunk and disorderly at Fort Pepperell. They were given in charge by Sergeant Russell. The men were fined $2.50 each.

A truck driver who was arrested on a charge of being intoxicated whilst in charge of a truck, after his truck was in collision with a pony and express, pleaded not guilty at the Magistrate’s Court yesterday. The hearing was postponed until Monday next.

A Chinaman summoned a youth yesterday for assault. The hearing was postponed till Thursday .

Two Canadian Soldiers were before Court yesterday, charged with being drunk and disorderly. They were fined $10.00 each.

Marriages: — The Marriage of Miss Kay Power to Mr. Tom Hennessey, both of Windsor, took place on Thursday evening past, at St. Joseph’s Church, Windsor, according to Grand Falls Advertiser.

A very pretty wedding was solemnized at St. Joseph’s Church Windsor, on Thursday evening of last week, when Miss Mary Critch, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Critch, Gaskiers, St. Mary’s, was united in marriage to Leonard Beson, son of Mr. and Mrs. James Beson, Windsor. Rev., F. Meaney, P.P., officiated. — Grand Falls Advertiser.

The two storey dwelling owned and occupied by Edward Hibbs, and situated near Lance Cove Road, was totally destroyed in a fire that broke out about 4 a.m. on Monday last. Mr. and Mrs. Snow, who were staying with them, escaped through a window in their night cloths, and lost everything they possessed. It was a severe loss to the owner, as the house was built last year and was only partly insured. — The Bell Islander.

Two American Soldiers were called to appear at the Magistrate's Court yesterday, on a charge of being drunk and disorderly on the public street, but they failed to appear. It was stated they has been released to the Military Authorities on instruction from the Department of Justice. Judge Browne expressed surprise that this had been done, without his having been notified, that the law had been extended from case of ordinary drunkenness to case of drunk and disorderly. He though it was curtailment to the jurisdiction of the Court, and he suggested to Inspector Whelan who was conducting the case, that the men be summoned."


December 3, 1941 OBSEQUIES LATE CAPT. ROBINSON "NORTH SYDNEY, Nov. 6 — Friends from many sections of Capt Breton gathered here Tuesday afternoon, to pay their final respects to one of this town’s best known residents, Capt. David Robinson, who was laid to rest in Lakeview Cemetery, after service at St. Matthew - Wesley United Church, and burial service was conducted by the Royal Albert Lodge, A.F. and A.M.

After a brief service was held at the deceased's late residence on Archibald Avenue, service took place at St. Matthew - Wesley Church, with hymns sung during this service, including, “Forever With The Lord”, and, “Jesus Saviour Pilot Me”. This service and graveside service were conducted by Rev. Neil D. Patterson, Pastor of the Church.

Following the service, the lengthy cortege re-formed, and proceeded to Lakeside cemetery, where interment was made, and at which time burial ritual of the Masonic Lodge was carried out, with James J. Kenna of the local order officiating. The pall bearers, all members of the local lodge, were Augus Young, G. Fred MacDonald, G.F. Goodwin, T. Porter Moffatt, Henry E Whiteman, and James Kenna.

The many messages, letters, and other tokens of sympathy received by the bereaved family, testified in a small degree, to the high esteem in which the deceased was held by a widespread circle of friends in Cape Breton and in Newfoundland.

The late Capt. Robinson passed away in Hamilton Memorial Hospital here, last Sunday morning, after an illness of six weeks, with his death coming suddenly and as a shock to his many friends. First Officer of the steamer Caribou, he had made many friends among the travelling public between here and Newfoundland.

He is survived by his wife, three daughters and two sons. The daughters are Mrs. Paul Andrea, (Rita), Margaret, and Hilda, all in North Sydney, while the sons are Bret, who is a member of the steamer Caribou, and John in North Sydney. Also surviving are two step-daughters, Mary and Helen Garab, and one step-son, Joseph Garab. A sister of the deceased, Mrs. C.P. Moore, resides in St. John’s, Nfld., and a brother, William, lives in Montreal.

A biography of Capt. Robinson appeared in a recent edition of the book, “Who’s In and From Newfoundland.”"

December 3, 1941 DIED AT THE GOULDS MRS. SUSANNAH FAHEY: Mrs. Susannah Fahey, of the Bay Bulls Road, was taken seriously ill on Saturday morning, and was found in a very weak condition by her daughter, Mrs. Howlett, who at once summoned aid, and Rev. Father Rawlins, P.P., of Petty Harbor, was called to administer the last Sacraments. The stricken woman passed away at an early hour on Sunday. The funeral took place on Monday afternoon; interment being in the R.C. Cemetery at the Goulds.
December 3, 1941 ANNOUNCEMENT The wedding takes place tonight at 8 o’clock in St. Mary’s Church, of Marjorie R., daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ben Morgan, to Chesley F., son of Frank and the late Jane Rogers, both of this city.
December 3, 1941 BIRTHS COMERFORD — At St. Clare’s Mercy Hospital, November 29th., to Margaret, wife of W.B. Comerford, Jr., a son.
December 3, 1941 DEATHS "LUSCOMBE — Passed peacefully away Tuesday, December 2nd., Emily Maunder, beloved wife of Andrew Luscombe. She leaves to mourn besides her husband, one daughter, Mrs. Roy Darby, and two sons, Harold, and Gordon of the Brookfield Ice Cream Ltd. Funeral by motor hearse from her late residence, 9 British Square, Thursday at 2.30 p.m.

SMITH — Passed peacefully away at 10.30 p.m. December 2nd, Sadie, beloved wife of Eloyal Smith. Leaves to mourn her husband, one daughter, and two grandchildren, two sisters, Mrs. Andrew Runner at Twillingate, and Mrs. Joseph House at Toronto, and one brother, Matthew Bulgin at Twillingate. Funeral on Thursday at 2.30 p.m., from her late residence, 222 Pennywell Road.

POWER — Passed peacefully away at Placentia Tuesday morning, December 2nd, Mrs. Rose Power, relict of the late Michael Power of Argentia, aged 85 years. Leaving to mourn, four sons, four daughters, one sister and one brother. Funeral, December 4th. R.I.P.

HEALEY — Passed peacefully away on Tuesday, Catherine Kavanagh, wife of Joseph Healey of the Avalon Telephone Co. Leaving to mourn, husband, one sister, and one brother. Funeral on Thursday, at 2.30 p.m., from her late residence, 20 Gilbert St. R.I.P.

STAMP — Passed peacefully away yesterday, December 2nd., Mary Phyllis (nee young), beloved wife of Frank Stamp, leaving to mourn, husband, one child, father, mother, four brothers, Gerald in the Merchant Navy, Trevor in the Royal Artillery, Lewis and Albert in St. John’s, two sisters, Florence at home, and Mrs. James Murdock of St. John’s. Funeral notice later."

December 3, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "The connection for the Green Bay service, which was to have been by tomorrow's express, has been extended to Sunday’s Overland Limited.

Because of power failure, all four mines on Bell Island were idle last Wednesday. To make up for the lost time, the mines are working all this week.

A plate glass window in the Broadway Bargain Store, Water Street, was broken early this morning by persons not known.

Last night, six Sailors were seen taking a hand cart belonging to a store on Water Street West. It was taken from them by citizens.

The Bell Islander states that the wedding of Lieut. John Morris of the Newfoundland Militia, and Miss Isable Dwyer, of the East End, took place on November 22nd.

The concrete wall near Indian Falls on Trinity Arm Road, has been completed, and the danger caused by the threatening bank has been eliminated largely. This work is and will be, appreciated by the public. – Fishermen’s Advocate.

The Trade Review states that the price of flour, pork, and beef remain unchanged. Peas, beans, and rice, are expected to move higher. Feeds have not shown any further advance. Advertisements for the sale of quite a few horses, gives indication of the scarcity of hay.

Two men who appear before the Magistrate’s Court often, on charges of drunkenness, were up again yesterday, and were allowed to go free, on making promises to take the pledge and keep it until Christmas. One of them came back in the afternoon, and because of his condition then, he was locked up again.

A steamer which was at Catalina recently, took the following cargo to Spain; F.P.U. Trading Co., 6.000 qtls codfish, J.T. Swyers & Co., 800 qtls codfish; S.W. Mifflin, 2,100 qtls, McCormak & Walsh, 1,200 qtls; and Monroe Exports Co., 500 qtls. A total of 10,400 qtls.

The Bonavista Correspondent of the Fishermen’s Advocate states, “A Near tragedy occurred here on Thursday last, when Mr. Isaac J Faulkener of the firm of J.T. Swyers & Co., accidentally contacted a leaky extension cord, with his hand upon which he had a wet glove. He received a sufficiently vicious charge of electricity to knock him unconscious, and he had to be conveyed to his home.

The Bonavista Correspondent of the Fishermen’s Advocate, again calls attention to the scarcity of fuel in that town. He states, “All ready, fences are being burned, and we heard of one instance where a family was compelled to burn some of the clapboard off their house. Unless the authorities takes some steps to cope with this situation, a substantial proportion of land will have to go out of cultivation next year, and the devastation effect of lack of winter fuel, upon their flakes and stages, will make itself apparent in the quarter of our fishery products of next year."


December 5, 1941 BIRTHS CRANFORD — At the Grace Maternity Hospital, Dec. 4th, 1941, to Mr. and Mrs. A.R. Cranford, LeMarchant Road, a son.
December 5, 1941 IN MEMORIAM "SOMERTON — In loving memory of our dear son, Private Peter Somerton, No 2779, who died of wounds at Gueudecourt, December 4th, 1917. Inserted by his mother and father, Mr. and Mrs. R.J. Somerton, Portugal Cove.

SHEA — In loving memory of William Shea, son of Peter and Mary Shea, Georgetown, Brigus, who on December 5th, 1940, gave up his gallant young life during an air raid at Devon, England.

""When twilight’s gently falling, My thoughts do ever stray, To that lonely Churchyard In Plymouth far away."" — Ever and always remembered by Margaret."

December 5, 1941 DEATHS BISHOP — Passed peacefully away at 8.30 a.m. yesterday, George Bishop, aged 79 years; leaving to mourn wife, two daughters, Hilda, and Mrs. Harold Noseworthy; two sons, Allan, and Eli; three brothers, one sister, eleven grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren. Funeral at 2.30 p.m. on Saturday, from his late residence, 47 Brazil Square.
December 5, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "A motorist who was before the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, charged with passing through a red light on Rawlins' Cross, was fined $2.00.

The motor car owned by taximan Simmonds, stolen from the Southside Road, as reported in yesterday’s News, was later found on Livingstone Street.

Up to yesterday, 408 feet of 6 inch, cast iron pipe, had been laid in Plymouth Road, and two six inch house drains were laid to the new Canadian Administration Building.

A lady who lives on Torbay Road, was before Court yesterday, charged with a breach of the parking regulations, and with driving without a licence. She was fined $3.00.

A motorist was fined $2.00 yesterday, for failing to obey the signal of a Traffic Officer. The accused stated he was driving from Water St. up Prescott St., and he mistook the Officer’s signal.

A Taximan was before Court on Wednesday, charged with selling liquor to an American Soldier. The case was adjourned on that day to get the evidence of the Soldier. Yesterday, the Soldier was called, and he denied ever having seen the Taximan, or the Policeman who took the liqor from him. In his evidence, the Constable who made the arrest, said that three civilians and a Soldier were drinking out of a bottle, after coming out of the Taxi Office. He stated that the Soldier, at the time, had given him his name as John Johnson, but that was incorrect. The case against the Taximan was dismissed, but the Soldier, who it was disclosed, had failed to pay a fine of $20.00 imposed several weeks ago, was ordered kept in custody until the fine is paid. His Honour also recommended that the Justice Department be informed of what happened, with a view to possible investigation as to a charge of perjury."


December 6, 1941 DEATHS CONNELLY — Passed peacefully away yesterday forenoon, Lawrence Connelly of Mt. Pearl, aged 68 years; leaving to mourn, wife, four sons, four daughters, one brother, and one sister. Funeral from his late residence 2.30 p.m. Sunday.
December 6, 1941 BIRTHS RUSSELL — Born at the Grace Maternity Hospital, Dec. 4th 1941, to Irene, (nee Best) wife of Const. Roy Russell, (Bell Island), a daughter.
December 6, 1941 MARRIAGE CLOUSTON — WAKELY: At St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Manse on Wednesday, Dec. 3rd., Weldon White, son Mr. and Mrs. John Clouston, Forest Rd., to Muriel Jean, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Wakely of Halifax, N.S.
December 6, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "Council employees have mixed 127 hogheads of salt and ashes, for use on slippery streets and inclines.

A Norwegian Steward was before the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, charged with being drunk and disorderly on board his ship, and was fined $5.00 and placed under bond. The Captain said, the accused was very abusive and had refused to work.

A Naval Rating was fined $25.00 at the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, on a charge of being drunk and disorderly. He was caught peeping into the room of a house on Finn Street on the previous night, after he was ejected from a house on Flower's hill.

Bowaters second Stenographers’ Patriotic Group, which has been sending articles to the boys overseas, has now struck upon a new innovation. The Corner Brook service boys have steadily been receiving the products of this group, but the new plan includes even more servicemen. They propose to write to the Newfoundland Commissioner in London and request him to forward the address of Newfoundland boys in the service who have no friends at home to send knitting and gifts, so that the group can oblige with parcels. — Western Star.

The Belloram Correspondent of the Western Star states that, “Schools of herring of marketable size, struck along here a couple of weeks ago, and everybody was hoping they would stay around. Fishermen got nets ready and soon had other fishing gear in the water, but unfortunately the school shied off before a good trial could be made with trawls. Turbot was scarce, but they found codfish in such quantities, that had bait been regularly obtained, the fishermen thought quite good earnings could be made. However it was only a flash in the pan, and the gear was taken up again."


December 8, 1941 CASUALTY REPORT MARSHALL, George Frederick, Seaman, JX316650 R.N., placed on dangerously ill list, next of kin, father, Mr. Andrew Marshall, Carbonear, Newfoundland.
December 8, 1941 DEATHS "BUCKINGHAM — Suddenly Saturday afternoon, December 6th., Barabara Ann, aged 4½ months, darling child of Herbert J. and K. Buckingham.

SHORT — Passed peacefully away 4.45 p.m., Saturday afternoon, at the Fever Hospital, after a brief illness, Stanislaus (Stan) Short, aged 31 years, younger son of James and Clara Short; leaving to mourn, wife, 3 children, father, mother, 4 brothers and 3 sisters. Funeral today (Monday) at 2.30 p.m., from the Fever Hospital. May the Sacred heart of Jesus have Mercy on his soul.

RICHE — Passed peacefully away after a long illness, on Saturday, Dec. 6th., at 3 p.m., Isaac John Riche aged 68 years, at his late residence, Outer Battery; leaving to mourn their sad loss, wife, five sons, Robert, Raymond, Cheslie, George, and William, also four daughters, Mrs. E. O’Neil, Mrs. R. Henderson, Mrs. A. Jennings all residing in the city, Mrs. G. West, Horwood, 37 grand children also 3 great-grandchild. Funeral takes place from his late residence at 2.30 p.m today, Monday, Dec. 8th.(Halifax papers please copy.)"

December 8, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "A woman, before Court on Saturday, charged with being in possession of liquor on which there was a defaced label, was fined $10.00

A Naval Rating was before Court on Saturday, charged with entering a private home and assaulting one of the inmates. He was remanded.

The stores open tonight for the Christmas trade, and will remain open every night, Sunday excepted, from now till Christmas eve.

It was extremely foggy yesterday and last night in the city. During the day, motor vehicles were forced to drive with lights. Last night it was difficult to drive, as lights were of very little service.

A Shopkeeper from New Gower Street was before Court on Saturday, charged with selling liquor. She had a previous conviction for the same offence. A fine of $100.00 was imposed."


December 9, 1941 PERSONAL "The wedding takes place at St. George’s, Bermuda, today, of Rev. Canon A.T. Tucker, M.A., and Lillan Hayward. Canon Tucker is a brother of Lady Outerbridge of this city. The ceremony will be performed by the Right Rev. The Bishop of Bermuda, who was at one time Rev. Canon A Heber Brown, Rector of Church of England, St. John’s.

L.A.C. Arthur Kelley, R.C.A..F., son of Councillor and Mrs. Kelly, who was home on a brief furlough, visiting his parents and relatives, leaves today to return to Canada."

December 9, 1941 CLERGY INJURED ON BUCHANS RAILWAY "Revs. E.M. Bishop and Maidment in Accident — Bishop Abraham On Same Train.

Rev. E.M. Bishop of Grand Falls, and Rev. Maidment of Buchans, were injured in a mishap Thursday morning, on the Buchans railway, about twelve miles from Buchans. It was learned by this paper that the Clergymen accompanied by Bishop Abraham, were en route to Buchans in a mine railcar, when the vehicle left the rails and overturned. Rev. Bishop is believed to have one rib cracked and is being held under observation for the present, in the Hospital at Buchans. Rev. Maidment received a cut in the forehead. As far as is known at present, Bishop Abraham fortunately escaped injury. The accident occurred about 11 o’clock on Thursday morning. — Grand Falls Advertiser."

December 9, 1941 OBITUARY "JAMES WILCOX: There passed to the great Beyond on November 19th., at the residence of his daughter, Mrs F.G. Chafe, Newfoundland Airport, Gander, James Wilcox, in his 77th year, to the deep regret of a wide circle of friends and associates, who will think kindly and respectfully of one good friend and gentleman the less. Mr. Wilcox, up to a year ago, had enjoyed excellent health and vigour, but a series of complications set in which hastened the end.

Early in life, “Jim” chose the profession of Telegraphist, and studied the intricacies of dots and dashes at the “Anglo” office in his home town — Brigus, where under the capable tuition of that prince among pioneer Operators, Thomas D. Scanlan, he soon became an expert Keyist and Receiver, which qualifications did not long escape the notice of Superintendent Perry of the “Anglo” Cable Station, Heart’s Content, resulting in Jim’s appointment to the staff there in 1883. A decade later, when “arbitrage” Stock Exchange traffic was evolving into gigantic proportions as a revenue producer, calling for gilt-edge Operatives on the “Stock wire”, he was one of the first detailed to this gruelling circuit, and in collaboration with other Morse aces, achieved an outstanding reputation in the telegraphic world, terminating only with the advent of the World War in 1914. The rapid increase in staff, because of war needs, from some 70 to 212 members, necessitated increased supervision, and in this new sphere, Supervisor Wilcox served the Company equally well, and faithfully Honorably retired on pension some twenty years ago, he pleasantly passed the eventide of life in historic research, as applying especially to Conception Bay, coupling therewith, keenness as a Philatelist. He took an active interest in Church affairs as well as those of State. Fraternally, he was a member of the L.O.A., and a charter member of court “Cable-ville” I.O.F.

Left to mourn are; his widow, Mrs. Florrie Carberry, Canso, N.S.; T. Gordon, Heart’s Content; John G., St. John’s; Mrs. Marjorie Chafe, Newfoundland Airport; and Frank at buffalo, N.Y., besides many grandchildren. Interment was at Heart’s Content on Sunday, 23 November, the Rector H.W. Facey, B.A., conducting the beautiful Anglican Burial Order. A silent testimony to the calling hence of a good man was evidence in the large assemblage, who witnessed the committal to Mother Earth. – “Until the Day Dawns.” LORIMER"

December 9, 1941 BAD WEATHER DELAYED DISCHARGING "During the last few days, the loading of schooners at the waterfront has been rushed, owing to the advanced season, and the prevalence of bad weather. Some of these schooners are taking on cargoes of provisions for the home run, while others, engaged in full-time freighting, may carry on operations late into the winter.

This has been a most trying year on the sailing fleet. Fishing has been carried on under the worst conditions that have prevailed for a long time. Schooners engaged in coastal freighting have been buffeted by storms and coated with ice, in that time of year when summer weather is normally expected. Add to these handicaps the inconvenience caused by the closing of St. John’s harbor to shipping at night, and it may readily be understood, that the ordinary hazards encountered by the schooner fleet have greatly increased. Then again, it is difficult to make up a crew for a vessel nowadays, as the wages paid to men on Base Construction are much higher that the best they could earn on a freighter.

While conversing yesterday with several schooner Captains, a News Reporter was informed that the process of loading or discharging a cargo was a nerve-wrecking affair. In some cases, a month passed before a fishing Captain could land his catch and take on a cargo of provisions for the home port. Labour is not available for the water-front, and the inadequate facilities of the business houses, sorely taxed by war conditions, are not capable of supplying demand.

Many of the schooners nowadays, are old, some of these having been repaired. But the fact remains that very little ship-building is being done.

After a successful summer’s fishing, Capt. T. Winsor of Wesleyville, has sold his fifty-seven ton schooner, the “Ruby and Nellie”. Capt. Winsor says that if he purchases another vessel, she must be at least of ninety tons burden.

Capt. J. Winsor recently arrived from the Straits of Belle Isle with a load of fish and oil. When the “Winnifred Lee” reached the harbor mouth, after a fast run from Wesleyville, Capt. Winsor found himself compelled to heave to for the night, until about 8 o’clock the next morning, when permission would be granted to enter the harbor. Capt. Winsor remained outside St. John’s Hr. one hour longer than the time occupied by his trip from Wesleyville. Fortunately, the sea was smooth at the time, although a dense fog made visibility practically zero."

December 9, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "The meeting of the Newfoundland Graduate Nurses Association, which was to have been held tonight, has been postponed, and will now be held next month.

Mr. William Monkarsh is moving his stock to Placentia this week and is closing his business on the Island. He has been in business there for the past twelve years. – The Bell Islander

A man was before Court yesterday charged with stealing a motor car belonging to Mr. W.A. Munn, and also with being drunk whilst in charge of a car. He was fined $20.00 on each, and will be debarred from obtaining a licence to drive for six months.

A dance will be held in the Prince’s Theatre on Bell Island tonight, in honour of Seaman Gear, who was Torpedoed before returning home on leave. As he is alone in the world, his friends desire ro make a purse for him. A collection is also being arranged for him through the various locals of the union.

The Windsor Board of Management had several car drivers before Court in Grand Falls last week, for failing to pay the regular fees for parking at Windsor. Some of the matters were settled out of Court, and the others were settled in Court to he satisfaction of the Board of Management.

A truck driver who recently was in collision with a pony and express on Water Street West, was before Court yesterday. He was convicted and fined $100.00 or two months imprisonment, and his licence was suspended for six months. He had two previous convictions for the same offence."


December 11, 1941 DEATHS "HORWOOD — Passed peacefully away at 6.30 a.m. December 10th, Abert Horwood, aged 89 years. Funeral at 2.30 p.m. Friday, from his late residence, 99 Cabot Street. (no flowers)

PIPPY — Passed peacefully away on Wednesday, December 10th., William George Pippy, aged 51 years. Funeral from his late residence, 178 Pleasant St., Dec. 12th at 2.30 p.m.

BURSELL — Passed peacefully away after a short illness, at Topsail, on Dec.10th in her 66 th. year, Mildred C., wife of the late James K. Bursell (Merchant); leaving to mourn the sad loss, are two daughters, Valda, Mrs. Brent Berg, and Irma, Mrs. J.C. Phillipps; also one son Rex at home. Funeral on Friday at 3 p.m. at Topsail."

December 11, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "The Presbyterian Ladies Aid Christmas Pantry Sale will be held in the Presbyterian Hall today, from 11 a.m. to 5.30 p.m. On sale will be Christmas puddings, cakes, mince meat, brawn, jellied tongue, etc. Also offered will be aprons, plain and fancy work, bags etc. Tea and coffee will be served.

The case against the Canadian Soldier who is charged with knocking down Mrs. Earle near Job Street, whilst riding a motor cycle, was supposed to come before Court yesterday but was postponed for a month. It was stated in Court that Mrs. Earle will not be well enough to give evidence before that time.

A New Gower Street Shopkeeper was before Court yesterday, charged with a breach of the Grading and Marketing Regulations Act. The evidence was that Inspector Meadus found potatoes in a paper bag, for sale in the shop, at 22 cents per gallon. The defendant stated he had bought the potatoes for $5.00 per barrel, and sold them as he bought them. A fine of $10.00 was imposed.

Stanley, son of Mr. and Mrs. William Clifford, Brooklyn, formerly of Trinity, whilst practicing in a football game in the playground of Public School No. 39, Brooklyn, broke his right forearm. He was taken to the M. E. Hospital where he was attended to by Dr. Clarke, who ordered him confined to Hospital. — Newfoundland Times.

Jane, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Whalen of Brooklyn, formerly of St. John’s, was injured in an automobile accident on November 20th. She was treated by an ambulance Surgeon from M.E. Hospital. The driver of the car was taken into custody and charged with careless driving. — Newfoundland Times."


December 13, 1941 CASUALTY REPORT "BROWN, Charles, Seaman, LT/JX280005, R.N. died in Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, England, December 8th 1941. Next of kin, mother, Mrs. Charles Brown, Frederickton, Notre Dame Bay, Newfoundland. (Transferred from Nfld. Overseas Forestry Unit.)

MARTIN, John Joseph, Sergeant, R.A.F., admitted to Horton General Hospital, Banbury, Oxfordshire, suffering from serious injuries sustained as the result of an aircraft accident on the 7th. December 1941. Next of kin, father, Mr. George T. Matin, Bishop’s Falls, Newfoundland."

December 13, 1941 DISCHARGES FROM ROYAL ARTILLERY "The Secretary for Defence, Lieut. Col. Rendell, has announced the discharge and arrival home of the following members of the Royal Artillery:

W/Bdr. 970303 — Beehan, William Joseph, Cupids, Nfld.

Gnr. 971383 — Maher, Thomas Francis, 29 Barnes Road, City.

Gnr. 971423 — Bowdring, Francis John, Bell Island, C.B.

Gnr. 971489 — Power, John Joseph, 429 Southside W., City.

Gnr. 971503 — Bussey, Thomas William, Burnt Head, Cupids, Nfld.

Gnr. 971518 — Hulan, Charles Ford, Jeffreys, Nfld."

December 13, 1941 NOTE OF THANKS The Berrigan Family, Theatre Hill, wish to thank all kind friends and sympathizers who personally or by messages, helped to alleviate their deep sorrow upon the death of their dear Aunt, Miss Elizabeth Berrigan.
December 13, 1941 MARRIED DZWORKOWSKI — BARTLETT: Married at Wesley Manse Saturday evening, December 6th, by Rev. W.B. Perry, Daphne, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Hedley B. Bartlett, 3 Mt. Royal Avenue, to Joseph A Dzworkowski of Ohio, U.S.A.
December 13, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "The weekly informal dance of the F.A.G.A. will be held at Bishop Feild College Hall tonight. Music will be provided by Ben and the King of Swing Canadian Dance Orchestra.

Out of respect of the late W.G. Pippy, the offices of the Newfoundland Tractor and Equipment Co. will be closed this afternoon, when the funeral of the deceased is taking place.

A Factory Manager was before the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, charged with showing a light on his premises during the recent blackout. Sentence was suspended.

A special meeting of the Newfoundland and Protective Association of Shop and Office Employees will be held at Victoria Hall tomorrow night at 9.45, for the purpose of considering matters related to the proposed shop closing hours act.

A man was before Court yesterday for being drunk and disorderly in a home near Mundy Pond. He was ordered to pay cost and to sign bonds for his future good behaviour.

A large cargo of soft coal was discharged at Bay Roberts last week. A cargo of anthracite was also landed.

An American truck driver was before Court yesterday for a breach of the traffic regulation. He was convicted but sentenced was supended.

Three motor car owners were before Court yesterday, and fined $1.00 each, for parking between “No Parking” signs on Duckworth Street and Water Street.

Last year, the effects of the war were not felt in the Codroy Valley. This year, however, it is quite different. A shortage is experienced in a number of commodities. Business firms, are having difficulty in getting the essentials, such as flour and feeds, along, quickly enough to supply the demand. Those who had any quantity on hand, loaned it to the neighbours until they themselves ran short. The situation here is serious, and we are hoping for a change soon. – Western Star.

A woman resident of Fleming Street was before the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, charged with being in possession of a bottle of liquor on which there was a defaced label. A Soldier, called for the defence, declared that the liquor belonged to him, and he left it at the house to be called for later. The woman was convicted and was fined $15.00."


December 14, 1941 OBITUARY "MRS. MARION MUIR: Amongst the younger generation, there are many, both here and abroad, who will learn with regret of the passing, on December 12th., of Marion Doyle, wife of Douglas Muir, in her 34th year.

Throughout her studentship at the Academy of Our Lady of Mercy, and her Secretarial career with the firm of T. McMurdo & Co. Ltd., as well as in her social and benevolent activities, Marion Muir’s kind and cheerful personality spontaneously won for her innumerable friendships, all of which she was characteristically gifted in retaining. Consequently, there are many who, with the intimate members of the family, will mourn her early passing, and particularly in the fact that she had recently recovered from a lengthy illness, only to suffer a relapse within the past few weeks.

In addition to her husband and daughter Marion, she is survived by her parents, Captain and Mrs. Edward J Doyle, her sister Rose, and her brother Jim, now serving with the Royal Air Force in Egypt.

The funeral takes place tomorrow, Sunday, at 8.45 p.m., from her late residence, 127 Military Road, and interment will be at Belvedere Cemetery."

December 14, 1941 WEDDINGS "DARRIGAN — COOPER: The wedding of Miss Sybil Darrigan to Alex Cooper, took place at Corner Brook on the 2nd December. The ceremony was performed at the Church of St. John the Evangelist by Rev. T.E. Loder, B.D — Western Star.

LEWIS — MURPHY: Miss Barbara Lewis of Petries, was married to Ronald J Murphy of Corner Brook West, at Corner Brook last week. The wedding was solemnized at Holy Redeemer Church and Rev. Father Baldwin officiated. — Western Star.

BROWN — DOVE: The marriage of Mr. Stanley Clyde Brown, son of Mr. and Mrs. William Brown, Curling East, to Pearl, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Dove of Samson’s Island, Notre Dame Bay, took place at St. Mary’s Church, Curling, recently. Rev. G.S. Templetor officiated. — Western Star."

December 14, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "The exhibition of Flemish Art by Mrs. A.C. Hunter, at Queen’s College, will be open to the public tomorrow, Sunday, at the usual hour.

The laying of the concrete sidewalk in Steer’s Cove was completed in the past week, and work is in progress on the erection of steps in James St.

Police, last night, were stationed at various places checking up on motor vehicles that were without head lights, tail lights or number plates. Several were found to be running without lights.

During the past two weeks, carloads of steel rails for the Branch railway, White’s Pond to Harmon Field, have been moving daily. It is understood the branch is nearing completion, and trains will be running to the Base before many weeks. This will be a great improvement in speeding up deliveries, with carload material going direct instead of having to be transferred from Stephenville and the Base. — Western Star.

A gardening club has recently been organized among the boys of the Convent School at Petries. Membership is entirely on a voluntary basis. The object is to instruct members in the rudiments of gardening with an effort to make people “land minded.”

A Navel Rating was before Court yesterday, charged with being drunk and breaking two panes of glass in the White Lilly Café. He was fined $5.00 and ordered to pay $3.50 in compensation for the damage done.

District Inspector Walsh arrived here yesterday morning with several Constables, in charge of a number of enemy aliens who were rounded up at Botwood and Corner Brook. A man who was sentenced to six months imprisonment for stealing motor vehicles at Corner Brook, also came along.

Work will shortly begin on extension of the Electrical Department work shop at Bowater’s Mill. The new structure will be a one story building approximately 31 feet by 33 ft., adjacent to the existing shop. This will provide space for storage of small motors, starters and miscellaneous materials. — Western Star.

A woman sued a Chinese Laundryman in the Civil Court yesterday, for laundry to the value of $3.00. She stated she left the laundry at the establishment of the defendant last spring, and called for it two months later but it could not be found. Several later attempts to get the parcel also failed, and she was advised by a Constable to take action. She provided a check with Chinese characters on white paper, which she stated she had been given when the parcel was delivered to the laundry. The defendent claimed the check was not his, and he was unable to identify the characters on it. He stated his checks were made on brown paper and were numbered. He produced sample checks in evidence. The case was dismissed."


December 15, 1941 OBITUARY "HARRY JAMES WYE MILLEY: News was received by cable yesterday, of the sudden passing at New Haven, Connecticut, of Harry James Wye Milley, Ph.D., M.A., only son of Mrs. and the late Hon. Samuel Milley.

The deceased was born in St. John’s in 1909, and received his early education at Bishop Feild College. Graduating from Feild, he went to England to enter Oxford University, from which he graduated with the degree of Master of Arts. He returned home, and subsequently entered Yale University, where he took his degree in Doctor of Philosophy. He was appointed to the staff of Yale University and took up his duties in September of this year.

He leaves to mourn, his mother and three sisters, Mrs. Henry Allen at St. Thomas, Ontario, Mrs. B.C. Gardner at Montreal, and Mrs. Norman McLeod of this city. Interment will be at St. John’s."

December 15, 1941 DEATHS "MILLEY — Suddenly at New Haven, Connecticut, on Saturday, December 13th, Harry James Wye Milley, Ph.D., only son of Mrs and the late Hon. S. Milley. Funeral notice later.

ATKINS — Passed peacefully away Sunday, December 14th, Edward Atkins, in his 57th year; leaving to mourn, wife, three sons, one daughter, brother and sister. Funeral takes place tomorrow, Tuesday, at 2 p.m., from his late residence, 31 Avalon Terrace, Topsail Road. May the Sacred Heart of Jesus have mercy on his soul."

December 15, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "A benefit dance was recently held at Brooklyn for Mr. Leo McGrath, formerly of Newfoundland, who fell from a fire escape next door of his home, while putting up a clothes line. He sustained several leg and arm injuries. — Newfoundland Weekly.

The weather on Saturday was very cold, and on the higher levels, a breeze of wind blew ground drift about, and made it most uncomfortable. Some of the men working in that section had their ears frostbitten. It was a bit milder on Saturday night, but yesterday morning it was cold again. The day was an ideal one and was enjoyed by many. About 10.30 last night, wet snow started to fall, and this changed to rain which lasted through the night.

Seven motorists were before Court on Saturday for various breached of the parking regulations. They were fined $1.00 each.

The Newfoundland Times states that Rt. Rev. Monsignor McGrath of the Chinese Catholic Mission, Ontario, Canada, will be visiting Brooklyn, sometime this month.

Some smaller ponds were in good condition for skating yesterday, and large numbers availed of the opportunity. The weather conditions were ideal and it was most pleasant.

A woman who lives in Gorman’s Lane, was before Court on Saturday, charged with failing to declare all the liquor in her possession, and with having a bottle of liquor on which there was a defaced label. The Police stated they found the bottle of rum without a label, in the attic of the house, in a hiding place between the ceiling and the roof boards. There were many empty bottles all over the house. Serial numbers on the rum bottle had been defaced. The woman’s son said he had put the liquor in the hiding place because there was a rumour going around that the stock at the Controller’s was running low, and he wanted some for Christmas. Whilst the son was giving evidence, the defendant became ill and had to be removed from the Court. The further hearing was adjourned.

Mr. Alan O’Keefe of Long Island, N.Y., formerly of Bannerman Street, St. John’s, is employed as Master Mechanic by the Shell Oil Co., Brooklyn. His brothers, Cyril and Patrick, served in the Royal Newfoundland Regiment during World War I. Their father was an employee at Government House for many years. — Newfoundland Times.

A French built dory, picked up outside the Narrows by the Police Harbor Patrol, can be had by its owners from the Police.

At the Magistrate’s Court on Saturday, Magistrate O’Neill handed down judgement in the case in which a Greek was charged with maliciously wounding an Egyptian shipmate. The accused was fined $25.00 and ordered to sign bond in the sum of $100.00. The Egyptian and a Portuguese, also on the ship, were bound over in the sum of $100.00 each. Sergeant M. Maloney conducted the prosecution, Mr. E. Wood appeared for the defendant.

Drivers of vehicles that attempted to get out of town yesterday, found some of the roads in the suburbs piled high with snow, and it was not possible to get through the drifts. Some men who live on the Southern Shore, going home for the weekend, had to leave motor vehicles, after getting past the Goulds, and proceeded the rest of the way on horse drawn sleds."


December 19, 1941 BIRTHS PUDDESTER — At the Grace Hospital yesterday, (December 18th) to Mr. and Mrs. Clayton W. Puddester, a son.
December 19, 1941 MARRIAGES "WIGHT — DURDLE: At the R.C. Cathedral on November 22nd., at 8 p.m., by the Rev. father Murphy, Monica, the youngest daughter of Mary and the late Edward Durdle of this city, to Albert Norman, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. N.R.J. Wight, of Montreal, Canada.

McNEILY — PROCTOR: On Saturday, December 6th., at the Chapel of the College of Missions, in Toronto, the wedding took place of Elizabeth Mary, only daughter of Rev. and Mrs. S.J. Proctor of Baysville, Ontario, to Rifleman James Rogerson McNelly, Chipawa Barracks, North Bay, son of Mr. and Mrs. J.A. W. McNeily, this city. The ceremony was performed by the bride’s father, Rev. S.J. Proctor."

December 19, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "The following passengers arrived yesterday from Grand Bank and Burin: — G. Lake, R. Barbour, T. Vincent, C. Squires, G. Thornhill, Sergt. G. Walter, Mrs. Walters and child.

Snow fences were erected at Pennywell Road and LeMarchant Road, in the past few days. These are only temporary erections and will be taken down again in the spring.

The Railway has announced special trains for Christmas on the Carbonear and Bonavista Branch Railways. Particulars of these are in the advertising column.

A set of concrete steps at the junction of James Street and Theatre Hill, has just been completed. That was alway a very bad corner and the steps will bring about a big improvement, especially in the winter months.

A large number of people were shopping last night and the stores were very busy. Stocks in many stores, are rapidly being depleted, and it is a long time since thee was such a shortage of toys, etc., as many day from Christmas.

Because there are so many men from outside St. John’s working on base construction this year, it is more difficult than usual for people in the city to secure Christmas trees. Some have been advertised for sale but the number is smaller than usual.

In the article on the opening of the New K of C. Hostel, on Harvey Road, which was published on Thursday, it was omitted to state that the Contractor who constructed the building was Mr. Farley, and that the Superintendent in charge of the work was Mr. LeFortune. How well he did his work is shown in the excellence of the building, both inside and outside.

A complaint made by a resident of Hutching Street last week, that water was entering the basement of her house, resulted in an investigation being made by the Sewerage Department of the City Council. It was found that is was coming from the old stone sewer, and further examination is being made to get at the root of the trouble."


December 24, 1941 MARRIAGES BUTLER — PITCHER: At the Church of St. John the Evangelist, Topsail, on June 24th, 1941, Marjorie V. Pitcher, daughter of Mrs. and the late H.E. Pitcher, to Alfred M Butler (Canadian Army), son of Mr. and Mrs. T.F. Butler.
December 24, 1941 DEATHS O’KEEFE — Passed peacefully away yesterday morning, after a long illness, Mary Jane O’Keefe, aged 92 years, daughter of the late Michael J O’Keefe. Funeral tomorrow Wednesday, at 2.30 p.m., from the residence of her nephew, N.J. Wadden, 34 Gower St. R.I.P.
December 24, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "Two Seamen who were charged with being drunk and causing a disturbance at the Caribou Hut, were fined $5.00 each yesterday at the Magistrate’s Court.

Hubert (Barney) Rice, charged with assaulting a lady, was committed for trial at the Supreme Court yesterday. The preliminary enquiry was held before Magistrate O’Neil.

Two Canadian Solders were before Magistrate O’Neill at the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, charged with damaging a fire alarm box and with knocking down traffic signs. They were fined $10.00 each for the first offence and $2.00 each for the second.

On Friday morning last, an accident occurred at Port Union near the Big bridge, when Mr. Gordon Johnston’s car with four occupants, skidded on the icy road and turning over, crashed to a stop on the rocks below. The accident occurred at the Southern end of the bridge, on the side towards the power house. The top of the car was badly smashed and beat in. Of the four occupants, only one was injured; this was the driver and owner, Mr. Johnston, who sustained a hurt shoulder. — Fishermen’s Advocate.

Two girls, who on Saturday, were charged with breaking a plate glass window, valued at $80.00, in the Imperial Cafe, last week, were before Court yesterday when additional evidence was taken. This was to the effect that one of them threw a bottle through the window, because her companion had been ejected. They were ordered to pay compensation for the window and to serve two months imprisonment. If the glass is not paid for, they must serve an additional month. After sentence was passed, one of the girls said it would be just too bad for the Chinaman after she got out of gaol. For making that threat, Magistrate O’Neill ordered her to sign a bond for her future good behaviour."


December 27, 1941 BIRTHS SPENCER — On December 26th, at Grace Hospital, to Mr. and Mrs. John Spencer, (nee Hope Thomson), a son.
December 27, 1941 DEATHS "POWER — On Wednesday, Dec. 24th., Margaret, daughter of the late Captain Charles and Elizabeth Power. Funeral took place yesterday, Dec. 26th. R.I.P.

PEYTON — Passed peacefully away on Dec. 25th at 2.30p.m., after a lingering illness, Rose Anna Peyton, aged 32 years, wife of Samuel Peyton, and daughter of Joseph and the late James Oliver; left to mourn their sad loss beside her husband, are a father, 4 sisters and 4 brothers. Funeral on Sunday at 2.30 p.m., from her late residence, 157 Casey Street."


December 29, 1941 OBITUARY "J GORDON CALLANAN: With startling suddenness, the death occurred at North Sydney, on Saturday night, of James Gordon Callanan, Engineer on the S.S. Caribou.

Deceased was the son of Mrs. B. and the late James P. Callanan, 71 Pleasant Street, and had been in the service of the Newfoundland Railway for several years, since obtaining his certificate.

He had not been ill except for ordinary ailments, and when he was stricken on Saturday night, none on board the ship thought that his condition was serious, though medical aid was summoned and everything possible done for him. His passing under these circumstances, is all the more sad, and will be learned of with regret, not only by his many friends in the City and other parts of the country where he visited, but by many who had occasion to travel on coastal boats, on which he served, and who knew him.

Quiet, unassuming, but painstaking and efficient, Gordon Callanan earned respect of his acquaintances and the esteem of his many friends. Of a retiring disposition, he sought not the limelight or prominence for anything he performed, but his sense of duty and loyalty were ever to the forefront, and Newfoundland has lost a good citizen, and the Railway a competent official, in his unexpected passing.

To his sorrowing mother, sister and six brothers, deepest sympathy will be extended. The body is being forwarded by the express, and announcement of the time of the funeral will be made after its arrival here."

December 29, 1941 BIRTHS AYRE — On Saturday, December 27th., at the Grace Hospital, to Olga, wife of Lewis M Ayre, a son.
December 29, 1941 MARRIAGES ROE — MEWS: On December 20th., 1941, in Boston, Elizabeth Frances Reynette Mews, daughter of the late F.A. and Dora Mews of St. John’s, Newfoundland, to Carlton DeWitt Roe of Baltimore, Md.
December 29, 1941 FUNERAL NOTICE MILLEY — The funeral of the late Dr. Harry Miley will take place by motor hearse at 2.30 this afternoon, from the residence of his mother, 54 Circular Road.
December 29, 1941 DEATHS "CALLANAN — Suddenly at North Sydney at 10 p.m. Saturday, December 27th., James Gordon, aged 37 years, son of Mrs. B and the late James P Callanan, 71 Pleasant Street; leaving mother, one sister and six brothers to mourn their sad loss. Funeral notice later.

CHAUNCEY — Passed peacefully away early Sunday morning, Willis S. Chauncey (Boiler-maker) Leaving to mourn his sad loss are, two sons and three daughters and a number of grandchildren. Funeral on Tuesday, December 30th., at 2.30 p.m. from his late residence, 38 Alexander Street."

December 29, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "The director of Air Raid Precaution has issued a notice that unannounced practice blackouts will be discontinued until further notice.

A motorist was before Judge Browne at the Magistrate Court on Saturday, charged with driving up Patrick Street during the blackout on Saturday, December 20th. He was fined $2.00

A man who was before Court on Saturday charged with being drunk and entering a house on Golf Avenue, where he became disorderly, was fined $2.00 and was ordered to sign bonds.

There was no session of the Patrician Association yesterday, but on next Sunday, Hon. Justice Higgins will make his annual address, dealing with events of the past year and prospects for the New year.

A man who was before Judge Browne at the Magistrate’s Court on Saturday, charged with stealing a carton of beer, the property of the U.S. Government, was remanded for sentence.

Four truck drivers were before Court on Saturday and were fined $2.00 each for having the number plates on their trucks obscured with mud. A motorist who went through a red light on Rawlin’s Cross, was fined $3.00, and another who committed a technical breach was fined $1.00.

Mr. Leo Bennett, son of Mr. and Mrs. Clifford Bennett, Brooklyn, is with the U.S. forces at camp Croft. S.C. “Ciff” was formerly from the Southside, St. John’s, and Mrs. Bennett was formerly Miss Mary Wall of Pouch Cove. – Newfoundland Times

A youth who often appears in the Juvenile Court, was before Judge Browne on Saturday, charged with breaking into a garage on Bambrick Street and stealing a sum of money. A Fireman at the West End Fire Hall, caught the accused, and when he was taken to the Police Station, he had $53.00 in his possession. He was remanded.

Men at Twillingate who have set their seal nets, have succeeded in getting a few bedlamers. The changeable winds, and weather from frost to mild, will keep ice from forming. Last winter there was little arctic ice, and sealing ships brought news of scarcity of such, all along the Coast. Winter will be late again this time, as far as ice and snow is concerned, but whatever, Jack Frost is likely to bite occasionally. Forecasters say we are in for a mild winter similar to last years’s. — Twillingate Sun."


December 31, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "One of Corner Brook’s best known business houses — the Canada Packers, Ltd., is having their warehouse space extended, and the work is being rushed to completion for winter storage.

The offices of the Engineers and Drafting of the Highroads Division, will be located in the top portion of the Court House in future. The sections formerly occupied by the Government Analyst, has been fitted up for the purpose.

A father and Son Banquet was held by Boy Scout Troop No.2 at Corner Brook last week. There were forty-three fathers and sons present. After supper generously provided by the mothers of the boys, a toast list was taken up, and each father was asked to say a few words.

At the monthly meeting of the Newfoundland War Veterans Association of New York, held recently, the following were nominated without opposition as the officers for 1942; Commander A.R. Richards; Vice-Commander, John Murphy; Secretary, Rex Field; Corresponding Secretary T. Kent; Treasurer, L.S.A. Field; Sergeant-at-Arms, Smythe. The officers will be installed on January 30th 1941.

The Nurses of the Corner Brook General Hospital gave a surprise dinner at Glynn Mill Inn last week, to Miss Kathleen Redmond, who has resigned her position on the Nursing Staff, to be married to Mr. Joseph McIsaac, formerly of Antigonish, N.S. After the dinner, a number of well wishers assembled at the home of Miss Redmond, and during the evening, on behalf of the Hospital Staff, presented Miss Redmond with a coffee percolator.

Roland Cluney of Grand Falls, has been promoted to Second Mate in the Mercantile Navy. He started out as a Trimmer on the S.S. Esmond, from Botwood. He has been torpedoed several times, and his career at sea may well be compared to a chapter from an Alger story. He is a son of Mr. and Mrs. George Cluney of Grand Falls. — The Advvertiser.

At the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, Augustus Hurley was charged with assaulting Jacob Nichols on Christmas Day. He was fined $10.00 and was ordered to sign bonds in the sum of $100.

The Western Star states that the Commissioner for Finances and Customs has notified the people of Curling, that the Customs Office at Curling will be reopened in January.

Mr. Steve Healey of Brooklyn, formerly of Chapel’s Cove, Newfoundland, recently sustained serious injuries when a column of steel fell on his chest while working on a construction job. — Newfoundland Weekly.

W. Clyde Baggs, son of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Baggs of Curling, has been appointed Mechanical Superintendent of the Bathurst Pulp and Paper Mills of Bathurst, N.S. Mr. Baggs is a graduate of McGill University in Mechanical Engineering - Class 1936.

At the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, His Honour Judge Browne, delivered judgement in the case of a man charged with being intoxicated whilst in charge of a car. The evidence was that the man whilst driving on Topsail Road, collided with a boy on a bicycle, and then ditched the car. The accused pleaded not guilty and stated that he had two drinks, and these were an hour before the accident. He stated his excited condition was due to the accident. A man who was with him all the evening, corroborated the testimony of the accused. No medical testimony as to the condition of the man was produced. He was convicted and fined $50.00, and his license was suspended for six months."

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